fishoninct

Oyster question

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I’ve never seen that before. I have a friend who’s an oyster man. If I ever see him I’ll ask. 
weathers nice he gets done working. He’s out on his bike. I may not see him till cold weather sets in again.

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Thanks for the replies. I emailed a state employee with the aquaculture group. She was super helpful. It is an orange sponge that attacks the shell and shortens the life of the oyster. It does not affect the tissue. 
Also, almost every oyster had a small crab living inside it. Extra bait. Lol. 
hope to get more soon. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Those oyster crabs are supposed to be great eating.   

 

Eta. Did some digging. 

Called a Pea Crab. 

From Pangea Shellfish..

 

I found a pea crab. What should I do with it?

Despite its spider-like appearance, pea crabs were known to be a delicacy and one of George Washington's favorite foods! Some in the Maryland area still regard them with love and enjoy eating them raw. In the same New York Times article, the author suggests a number of ways pea crabs "may be prepared for the table." Surprisingly, there were no modern recipes online, so we listed a few recipes found in old articles and cookbooks below. So instead of yelping and disposing your pea crabs next time, look at them in a new light and try some of these recipes:

“Arrange a small mound of oyster crabs on a crisp leaf or lettuce and cover lightly with a mayonnaise that has been tinted a faint pink by the use of beet juice. Garnish with tiny bits of lemon.

The crabs are also delicious if fried in much the same manner as one would fry whitebait. To do this dip the crabs in flour, afterward in cold milk, and finally, in powdered cracker crumbs. Put them in a colander and shake them gently... then drop them into very hot fat, but do not let them stay over three minutes. Garnish with fried parsley before serving.”

 

Edited by PSegnatelli

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On 6/23/2021 at 8:10 AM, PSegnatelli said:

Those oyster crabs are supposed to be great eating.   

 

Eta. Did some digging. 

Called a Pea Crab. 

From Pangea Shellfish..

 

I found a pea crab. What should I do with it?

Despite its spider-like appearance, pea crabs were known to be a delicacy and one of George Washington's favorite foods! Some in the Maryland area still regard them with love and enjoy eating them raw. In the same New York Times article, the author suggests a number of ways pea crabs "may be prepared for the table." Surprisingly, there were no modern recipes online, so we listed a few recipes found in old articles and cookbooks below. So instead of yelping and disposing your pea crabs next time, look at them in a new light and try some of these recipes:

“Arrange a small mound of oyster crabs on a crisp leaf or lettuce and cover lightly with a mayonnaise that has been tinted a faint pink by the use of beet juice. Garnish with tiny bits of lemon.

The crabs are also delicious if fried in much the same manner as one would fry whitebait. To do this dip the crabs in flour, afterward in cold milk, and finally, in powdered cracker crumbs. Put them in a colander and shake them gently... then drop them into very hot fat, but do not let them stay over three minutes. Garnish with fried parsley before serving.”

 

Pretty cool information. I will dig today I. The oyster area. Pics to come with harvest. 

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Awesome!   Good luck!   

 

When I worked in grocery stores I had a regular that went diggin just about everyday.  He constantly left me bags of clams & oysters.  Which I never complained about!  But he was the one that told me about eating them.  He ate em raw. I never tried em, left that job shortly after that conversation. 

 

I wonder if that orange stuff is what leaves pinholes in the shells?  I find alot of oyster shells with holes all over them. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Found a bunch yesterday. Will send pic. 

 

I am a brave eater, but think I will cook any crab I find. 

Edited by fishoninct

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1 hour ago, fishoninct said:

Found a bunch yesterday. Will send pic. 

 

I am a brave eater, but think I will cook any crab I find. 

Me too! And I'll eat just about anything!  But was always told never eat raw crustaceans. 

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"...pinholes in the shells?"

Those are done by boring sponges (genus Cliona).  Do a search on "boring sponges" and you'll get biology, distribution and pictures. If anyone's done any semi-serious oyster shucking he or she has probably come across oysters with heavily bored shells that just about crumble when you try to open 'em. As the articles state, it doesn't damage the meat but it makes the shucking kind of challenging. I avoid them.

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1 hour ago, Nils S said:

"...pinholes in the shells?"

Those are done by boring sponges (genus Cliona).  Do a search on "boring sponges" and you'll get biology, distribution and pictures. If anyone's done any semi-serious oyster shucking he or she has probably come across oysters with heavily bored shells that just about crumble when you try to open 'em. As the articles state, it doesn't damage the meat but it makes the shucking kind of challenging. I avoid them.

How you doing Nils? Long time no see. Everything good in FL?

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Doing good Mike-except for some pretty hot late spring/early summer weather. But it hasn't reached 95 degrees and I don't think it has in the 17 years we've been down here. It doesn't get hotter here than it does back in the world, but for sure there's a lot more of it.

 

I couldn't let this thread go. I did Eastern oyster and surf clam histology for four years or so back in undergrad/post grad days. Not surprisingly, 'cause many fisheries work on a boom and bust cycling, the surf clam fishery is pretty well diminished  and the oyster industry is starting to build (or "be rebuilt) is maybe more accurate) since then.

 

I hope you and yours are doing well. Are you going to bring you boat to Barnegat or keeping it up North? My last NJ boat was in New Gretna until the greenheads forced me out. Moved it from there to a marina next to the Captain's Inn. Not as nice water but much more civilized flying pests. I don't think there are many critters that are more annoyingly persistent than greenheads.

Edited by Nils S

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1 hour ago, Nils S said:

Doing good Mike-except for some pretty hot late spring/early summer weather. But it hasn't reached 95 degrees and I don't think it has in the 17 years we've been down here. It doesn't get hotter here than it does back in the world, but for sure there's a lot more of it.

 

I couldn't let this thread go. I did Eastern oyster and surf clam histology for four years or so back in undergrad/post grad days. Not surprisingly, 'cause many fisheries work on a boom and bust cycling, the surf clam fishery is pretty well diminished  and the oyster industry is starting to build (or "be rebuilt) is maybe more accurate) since then.

 

I hope you and yours are doing well. Are you going to bring you boat to Barnegat or keeping it up North? My last NJ boat was in New Gretna until the greenheads forced me out. Moved it from there to a marina next to the Captain's Inn. Not as nice water but much more civilized flying pests. I don't think there are many critters that are more annoyingly persistent than greenheads.

Not really sure yet. I may or may not move her to NJ, my grandkids are pushing me to, but I’m not sure yet. The fishing in RI seems to be much better that the fishing in NJ. 

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Finally got to see my friend the oysterman. He sees that orange on oysters all the time and tells me it is a sponge. He also told me that when the oysters are harvested, they are washed with high power hoses so at market you'd never see that, or any crap on the shells.

He also told me the season for oysters is still open until July 20. I guess that shoots down the old saying "Oysters R In Season"

Meaning oystering is only done in months with the letter R

 

As far as eating oysters with the sponge on it. I'm more worried about the stuff you can't see in the oyster ( or clam ) as the water temps rise.

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2 hours ago, The TideRunner said:

Finally got to see my friend the oysterman. He sees that orange on oysters all the time and tells me it is a sponge. He also told me that when the oysters are harvested, they are washed with high power hoses so at market you'd never see that, or any crap on the shells.

He also told me the season for oysters is still open until July 20. I guess that shoots down the old saying "Oysters R In Season"

Meaning oystering is only done in months with the letter R

 

As far as eating oysters with the sponge on it. I'm more worried about the stuff you can't see in the oyster ( or clam ) as the water temps rise.

That "R" thing only applies to wild oysters, farmed oysters are mostly triploid oysters that are sterile and can be eaten all year long.

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