Mallard1100

Jetty Line Recommendation?

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I’m going on a work trip this week and will most likely get some time in to fish a jetty and inlet area here in NJ. I’ve yet to fish from a jetty with the fly rod only a boat. I was thinking of bringing my full sink line or I have a SA sonar sink 30 with a floating running line to fish. Back up reel with a floating line in case I want to throw some poppers for blue fish. Any recommendations? Thanks.

 

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If you’ve never fished a jetty, from the jetty, I’d be way more concerned about what you are going to wear on your feet. 
 

Any old sinking line will do if that’s how you want to fish. 

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5 mins ago, Oakman said:

If you’ve never fished a jetty, from the jetty, I’d be way more concerned about what you are going to wear on your feet. 
 

Any old sinking line will do if that’s how you want to fish. 

I’ve been fishing from jetty’s my whole life just not with a fly rod. Definitely will not be fishing without my corkers that’s for sure. I was just curious on favorite line setups from the more seasoned shore bound fly rodders then myself. 

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Inlet jetties typically have a shallow side and a deep side. If I am fishing the shallow side I prefer an intermediate. The deep side gets a full sink or sink tip. If you have fished the jetty by boat I would use the line you use for that. 

 

Don't forget the stripping basket. 

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Cheapest running line & Shooting heads on the 3 densities, jetties usually are 360 wind and ocean exposed platforms, we might face a wind change of direction once we are in the middle of the jetty, so be ready to shift hands, cackhanded or do the Barnegat cast, sinking are much less wind resistance and “easy “ to cast.

 

if we can’t do our homework before step in to the rocks because it’s at low light situation, I always start with a floating, and go from there, so a two sets o flash lights are important to consider.


Great tips posted here.

 

I usually use no waders, korkers and well drainage basket a must, stop at your trusty local shop or talk to locals for basic news by the last few tides, from presence of weeds to bait ...make sure they know it’s your first time in that jetty.

 

 

My worst case scenario :angel:

 

from 4:10 on the actual clip.

 

https://youtu.be/Xu5ir6TOOsw

 

We all hope all the cast are going to go smooth and hit target, but realistically, we all know that there is always going to be one cast, and it’s going to happen on that wave set that we didn’t get the timing very wisely for whatever the reason and if we didn’t anticipate the situation we are going to stress a bit if we didn’t planned the way out.

 

There is usually no second chances on long casting from a jetty if your running line storage inside the basket doesn’t cooperate on the useless 80’ casting and it tangles at the stripping guide to only jump in to a birds nest pile at your feet, here we have a terrible situation only because it’s not sand under our feet, regardless how friendly the actual conditions are, things can go bad real quick, surprisingly, that many here didn’t mention, but it will if you spend enough time over any rocky structures.

It’s when the line tangled at your feet gets suck by the incoming surf and disappear in to few of the the rocks gap and barnacles in a blink of the eye while your focus on the shooting head, leader and fly still fishing 40’ in front of you at the surf mercy but, now we open  another front, that next wave set it’s building up coming your way while you are focusing on the line tangle at your feet...

 

Keep your eyes on the wave sets.

Cut the cheap running line, save the head if you can, do not try to go for it thinking you can safe the running line and untangle everything. Usually fast sinking heads are the worst to untangle from rocks and shells etc

I like best to cast short about 2 or 3 times rod length parallel to the rocks, be safe and good luck!

mag

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how long is the sink tip?  Be careful with sinking line.  Remember there is jetty under the water as well.  Dont let that sinking line get too close to the rocks below you as it can get hung up in the rocks.  I like intermediate line personally.

 

Agreed on foot grip safety.  some jettys are safe and some are treacherous in certain conditions.  Speaking from experience i slipped on a jetty i had fished over 100 times and new very well.  One mistep... broke my shoulder ond tore 280 degree of my labrum off.  got 5 anchors in the shoulder and was out of comission between surgery and rehab for almost a full year.

 

rain or misty mornings can make some jetties into ice!

 

 

 

 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

5 hours ago, magayanes said:

Cheapest running line & Shooting heads on the 3 densities, jetties usually are 360 wind and ocean exposed platforms, we might face a wind change of direction once we are in the middle of the jetty, so be ready to shift hands, cackhanded or do the Barnegat cast, sinking are much less wind resistance and “easy “ to cast.

 

if we can’t do our homework before step in to the rocks because it’s at low light situation, I always start with a floating, and go from there, so a two sets o flash lights are important to consider.


Great tips posted here.

 

I usually use no waders, korkers and well drainage basket a must, stop at your trusty local shop or talk to locals for basic news by the last few tides, from presence of weeds to bait ...make sure they know it’s your first time in that jetty.

 

 

My worst case scenario :angel:

 

from 4:10 on the actual clip.

 

https://youtu.be/Xu5ir6TOOsw

 

We all hope all the cast are going to go smooth and hit target, but realistically, we all know that there is always going to be one cast, and it’s going to happen on that wave set that we didn’t get the timing very wisely for whatever the reason and if we didn’t anticipate the situation we are going to stress a bit if we didn’t planned the way out.

 

There is usually no second chances on long casting from a jetty if your running line storage inside the basket doesn’t cooperate on the useless 80’ casting and it tangles at the stripping guide to only jump in to a birds nest pile at your feet, here we have a terrible situation only because it’s not sand under our feet, regardless how friendly the actual conditions are, things can go bad real quick, surprisingly, that many here didn’t mention, but it will if you spend enough time over any rocky structures.

It’s when the line tangled at your feet gets suck by the incoming surf and disappear in to few of the the rocks gap and barnacles in a blink of the eye while your focus on the shooting head, leader and fly still fishing 40’ in front of you at the surf mercy but, now we open  another front, that next wave set it’s building up coming your way while you are focusing on the line tangle at your feet...

 

Keep your eyes on the wave sets.

Cut the cheap running line, save the head if you can, do not try to go for it thinking you can safe the running line and untangle everything. Usually fast sinking heads are the worst to untangle from rocks and shells etc

I like best to cast short about 2 or 3 times rod length parallel to the rocks, be safe and good luck!

mag

 

 

I have conventionally fished jettys for 20 years and still carefully pick and choose when I venture out with the fly rod.  This was great advice, can't really say it much better...

 

A piece of advice that's simple enough is to pick one jetty and fish it often and long enough to be dedicated in understanding how it works. The dangers in the relationship and how to keep safe are the most important thing...if your serious about fishing a jetty, your last consideration should be the fishing. 

 

And yea, I said relationship

Edited by DeepBlue85

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I've reached an age where some of my favorite jetties are in my rear view mirror because what I went through to get out on them when I was younger just can't be done anymore (by me). So now I fish more often on what I guess would be called "groins". The ones I fish I've fished since the 70s so I have a pretty good feel for what tides are worthwhile and which lines are best. For one the water is relatively shallow for about 70-80' then you reach the channel; I like this one with an intermediate line, let the tide swing it into the money zone. At high tide the tip is underwater so I don't fish it then as it can mess up the line and also complicates landing a fish if they get in there. The other one is a lot deeper and I like a fast sinking head with braided mono. That one only fishes well at high tide. Footing is everything though, I've broken a few rods falling on the ones I avoid now and that was when I was in my 30s.

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When I fished the Breezy Point jetty, I used a floating line (and a stripping basket). There's so much current around a jetty, and a lot of the time the fish are holding tight to structure. When fishing toward shore, casting parallel to the waves, a floater is easy to pick up and recast again and again without bringing in too much line. When fishing the tip, it's easy to cast out and control the drift. When the bass were right up against the rocks, I would often just jig a weighted fly 0-20 feet out. This usually happened at night, in calm conditions or at slack tide. In all these scenarios, I never used anything but a full floating line.

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Sinking lines can cause much amusement to the Spin boys who may observe us fly fishing them off Jetties.

 

They can be very difficult to use. When they spill from your line tray and they will they have this wonderful ability to get into  in exsessable cracks and get jammed up.

 

 Floater with a sink tip is possibly a better bet. 

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Thanks for all the tips gents. Unfortunately I have been tied up with work and only got out this morning for a quick hour. Fished a full sink and it was a total pain in the ass. Snagged twice and lost 2 flies.  Tough to manage . I will try an intermediate next or floater with a sink tip next. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

It’s the way to learn. Your own experience.Priceless.

 

Fair play to you or as our Ozzie mates might say fair dinkum.

 

mikey. 

Edited by Mike Oliver

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Full sink lines are tricky on a jetty. If conditions make it  hard to manage running line cleanly you'll lose that line quickly. Need a stout rod that can unplug and rollcast most of the head or the submerged riprap will get you too, even with a clean cast and retrieve. Most successful jetty trips bait is holding tight to the rocks, and from your elevated position you'll get some good visual and good shots in close . Stick with a full floater or slow sink intermediate, a jiggy or clouser will get you a few feet deep if necessary and still make for easy pickup and cast.

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