guitaristgene

Question about tipping guides - freshwater drift trip

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48 posts in this topic

2 mins ago, Cpalms said:

It’s doesn’t matter what you pay your plumber, bartender, barber, waitress, accountant or gynecologist.  Fishing guides in the US of A are expecting a 20% tip.
 

Like it or not

Cpalms 

 

They can expect but they need to change in my opinion. If they are low paid and don’t like it get out.  No one is forcing them to be a Guide.

Sorry but I see it as demeaning and all but begging. Does this mean Guides have no pride.
They need to forge change in the industry that they work in. Why should they be a special case.

 

 

Should I ever take a guided trip and the Guide decided he wanted to go over the time then I would insist if he would let me to pay for the extra hours and plus some for overtime.
 

Why can’t this business be transparent and have the correct fee out front and no tip. 
 

I dislike this practice so much that guess what I will never take a guided trip.

I wonder how many more guys feel the same. We lose sure but the Guides lose hard money.

I don’t wish to spend a day with another who had at the forefront of his mind a 20% tip. We are not going to gell.

I hear you, I can’t argue with a fact. But I and others who dont like it have a choice.  I made mine a long time ago.
 

To give and to receive gratuities is demeaning. It belongs if it ever did in feudal times.

 

Dont wish to cause anyone offence with my beliefs cemented in the industrial heartlands where injustices still exist between employer and worker.

Mike

 

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2 hours ago, Mike Oliver said:

Cpalms 

 

They can expect but they need to change in my opinion. If they are low paid and don’t like it get out.  No one is forcing them to be a Guide.

Sorry but I see it as demeaning and all but begging. Does this mean Guides have no pride.
They need to forge change in the industry that they work in. Why should they be a special case.

 

 

Should I ever take a guided trip and the Guide decided he wanted to go over the time then I would insist if he would let me to pay for the extra hours and plus some for overtime.
 

Why can’t this business be transparent and have the correct fee out front and no tip. 
 

I dislike this practice so much that guess what I will never take a guided trip.

I wonder how many more guys feel the same. We lose sure but the Guides lose hard money.

I don’t wish to spend a day with another who had at the forefront of his mind a 20% tip. We are not going to gell.

I hear you, I can’t argue with a fact. But I and others who dont like it have a choice.  I made mine a long time ago.
 

To give and to receive gratuities is demeaning. It belongs if it ever did in feudal times.

 

Dont wish to cause anyone offence with my beliefs cemented in the industrial heartlands where injustices still exist between employer and worker.

Mike

 

Hey Mike,

 

i’m not telling anybody what to do. You can hire a guide and not tip them; Happens all the time. I’m just relaying what the vast majority of guides expect or what is the proper etiquette. My experience is that if you do tip properly, your results will be better. 

 

Let’s face it, paying somebody to drive you around and tell you where and how to fish is a luxury. Most of the guys that indulge in these luxuries would sooner choke than to not adhere to the proper etiquette. And tipping in this manner is, sensible or not, is proper etiquette.


From where I come from, there are few insults worse than being called a “bad tipper”. 

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Cpalms,

 

Dam it I can totally  see where you are coming from much as it pains me and my personal beliefs.

 

I have a huge problem with some of my Brit friends who do not pay the proper gratuities to waiters in restaurants. I get into arguments with them. I think this is a bigger problem to resolve and whilst it exists I am going to ensure the person serving us is properly rewarded. They would have to be very average not to receive 20% and if exceptional and made our night what’s wrong with 25% . It is not just about the food that can make us feel good.
 

This is of course at odds with my view on tipping guides. 
 

Owner Operators  have no justification for expecting a tip. Why not state in your terms of business what your day rate is and that every thing is included.

 

Where Guides are employed and are known to be badly paid then in spite of my beliefs you are obligated to play the game. I could never go against local etiquette and custom. 
I avoid the conflict by not taking guided trips.

 

My hope is that the Guides get organised yes Unionised even and fight for better pay. It can be a very tough gig being a Guide and they deserve to be remunerated properly.
 

Again it is paradoxical but where tipping is the norm to be a bad one is pretty darned shameful.

 

One day I hope it will not be necessary.

 

Mike

 

 

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I dont see why you would tip a guide on a solo trip that is costing you 600 plus dollars. It's you and him . His pay is in  the cost of the trip he is not a mate. Mates get tips not guides who you are paying money to take you fishing.  

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20 hours ago, Kml said:

I am heading to the north platte in Sept also. The week after labor day.

Have you been there in September before?


Praying for a good hopper season

That's when I will be there too. I fished it last year and the two years before in September and it was fantastic. In fact, last year my two days (guided) on the river were the best fly fishing for trout I have ever experienced with many, many 16" - 20" browns and rainbows released each day. As with previous trips I fished double and even triple nymph rigs under an indicator and one day used a local streamer of sorts that is a small crawfish imitation. These were all rigged up by the guide. Not sure about hoppers; it might be a bit late for them but of course it depends which part of the river you're fishing. I know they are a "go-to" on the Miracle Mile in August. FWIW, last year the day after my second drift trip the temperature dropped 40 degrees and there was about 6 inches of snow, more up in the Snowies! But that was mid/late September. If you haven't fished there before know that a LOT of the river is posted; there are only a few areas where you can wade fish. Don't expect obvious hatches at that time but caddis are pretty much always around. The times I've done that on my own I've used fairly large attractor-type dries and caddis, plus streamers and very small nymphs under an indicator. I've done OK on my own but nothing compared to my days with the guides over the last three years. Also, the wind pretty much never stops except for a little while very early in the morning so unless you are a very good caster, leave the light rods at home and go with a 9'6wt. Or even a 7wt. if you're going to be using streamers. In most of the areas from the border of CO and on north the river runs through very open land, hence the issues with wind.

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17 hours ago, guitaristgene said:

That's when I will be there too. I fished it last year and the two years before in September and it was fantastic. In fact, last year my two days (guided) on the river were the best fly fishing for trout I have ever experienced with many, many 16" - 20" browns and rainbows released each day. As with previous trips I fished double and even triple nymph rigs under an indicator and one day used a local streamer of sorts that is a small crawfish imitation. These were all rigged up by the guide. Not sure about hoppers; it might be a bit late for them but of course it depends which part of the river you're fishing. I know they are a "go-to" on the Miracle Mile in August. FWIW, last year the day after my second drift trip the temperature dropped 40 degrees and there was about 6 inches of snow, more up in the Snowies! But that was mid/late September. If you haven't fished there before know that a LOT of the river is posted; there are only a few areas where you can wade fish. Don't expect obvious hatches at that time but caddis are pretty much always around. The times I've done that on my own I've used fairly large attractor-type dries and caddis, plus streamers and very small nymphs under an indicator. I've done OK on my own but nothing compared to my days with the guides over the last three years. Also, the wind pretty much never stops except for a little while very early in the morning so unless you are a very good caster, leave the light rods at home and go with a 9'6wt. Or even a 7wt. if you're going to be using streamers. In most of the areas from the border of CO and on north the river runs through very open land, hence the issues with wind.

Good info, thank you. 

We will be staying for five days in the cottages by the gray reef fly shop. We are three so we booked a guide for the first three days and will do one guy in a boat and two on foot for three days and just wing it for the last two. Flying into and out of Denver so we will take an extra day in CO to fish a river there yet to be determined. 

 

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On 5/11/2021 at 5:33 PM, guitaristgene said:

I've taken many charters in saltwater in the Keys, Costa Rica, elsewhere and usually count on tipping the captain 20% (and if there is a mate, 10% - 15%). This is related to a freshwater drift trip however. I will be returning for the third year to an area in southern Wyoming to fish the North Platte. For the previous two years I've booked drift trips (full day, by myself) and enjoyed fantastic fly fishing for big trout. In all cases - a total of four drifts - the cost was $500 for the day, about 6 - 7 hours on the river and I tipped my usual 20%, i.e., $100. Was that reasonable? Too little? I ask because I'm trying to book two trips through the same shop for this coming September and in spite of emails and messages via their Facebook page with my request I have not heard back from them. This is strange because they got right back to me before. I doubt they are fully booked as they have 4 or 5 guides working out of the shop and the time I'm going is past "prime time." I'm hoping I haven't been branded a bad tipper and that's why they are not getting back to me! FWIW, I got along great with the three different guides I've used, I think I'm about as low maintenance as they could hope for, I'm a pretty decent caster and fisherman (I think), and in each case gave them a great write up on Trip Advisor. I guess the next step is calling them - d'uh - but I just wanted to know if anyone here has had a similar experience or am I just being paranoid?! I hope not..... I truly did really have a great experience before. Thanks

A 20% Tip is fair & your guide will appreciate you for doing the right thing. Your post touches on a subject that transcends a person's personal philosophy of tipping. The truth is, we need to examine this conundrum not from the client's point of view but from the guides point of view, because that's where the only answer that matters resides.

 

Whenever I took somebody out for an entire day & gave them a true five-star experience,  I would expect a 20% tip or thereabouts and if I didn't get it then I would do the same thing you are doing. I would look at myself and ask myself if I did something, or even a number of things wrong.

 

This coming from a person who used to guide. I've done a couple hundred trips over the years. Guiding is about creating five-star hospitality but also it's about technical instruction. Most fishermen, no matter how good, if they are being guided, they will benefit from local knowledge on the watershed at the very least. Most people who take guided trips need a lot more than just that in terms of instruction. 

 

If we are talking fresh water we have multiple hatches going on which need to be deciphered. Insects are behaving in all different ways and that translates to how you fish flies. There's a world of knowledge there that can be imparted to a visitor, especially one who might be fishing the watershed for the very first time or maybe someone who just does it a few times a year. 

 

Guiding is all about serving and teaching and making someone smile. Good guides go above and beyond and generally they get tipped well almost every single time they take someone out.

 

Guides who get less than 20% probably served a soggy submarine sandwich from Subway to their client with a straight face, while they pulled the boat over somewhere and the client had to sit on a rock shivering while they ate and drank their can of pop.

 

Take a look across the bank and you'll be daydreaming about two guys sitting in camping chairs, with little buddy heaters set up near them. They're sitting under a pop-up canopy and their guide is serving them an amazing lunch, probably with some wine or beer & some classy touches. Hors d'oeuvres? (Is it so hard for a guide to break out a triscuit with a little cream cheese & shrimp cocktail or perhaps some cool crackers and horseradish cheddar cheese pub spread?)  That's a rhetorical question. The answer is it's not and I guarantee you 95% of all clients would never expect hors d'oeuvres on a fishing trip. But what if? Imagine a trip where the food is so good and the experience was so wonderful that you are left, 20 years later, by far remembering the experience more so than having a few chances to catch a fish.

 

In order for a guide to create that experience he needs to prepare in advance. Imagine a growler full of craft beer being served from chilled mugs. Sure that drives the cost of the trip up a little bit, but then the client gets what they pay for, don't they?

 

The same is true in salt water. A guide who just takes a client out, drives the boat around and hands the client a water or a beer is just a guide. There's a real good chance he won't get a 20% tip.

 

But a guide who makes the day all about you & does everything possible to make sure you're comfortable, safe, hydrated, fed & happy is a 5-Star experience provider. They take numerous pictures of you in action. They ask lots of questions. They take the time to get to know you. They consult with you and find out what you're looking for out of the experience. They make the whole day all about you. 

 

A good guide is so good at fishing in that locale that they can take just about anybody out and catch a few fish. I've seen guides who hang their hat on this concept. They think that the key to the whole trip is at the client catches a fish and in fact, if the client doesn't catch a fish they offer the next trip free. These types of guides miss the entire point of guiding.

 

When you go on a fishing trip it's not called a catching trip. Part of fishing is fishing and sometimes you don't catch. Guides try to avert this at all costs and 90% of the time they certainly can help you succeed. It isn't the act of fishing that a good guide is great at.

 

Good guides create experiences. The kind of experiences clients rave about. Tips take care of themselves.

 

From the guides perspective, if they feel like they did a great job and didn't get a very good tip, if at all, then they should first examine themselves. They may be aware of some of the things they did wrong. They may not be.

 

Good guides survey their clients. They ask for feedback. They want to know if there was anything else they could have done that would have made the trip more enjoyable or more fun?

 

Guides need feedback. Guides need to hone their craft and continually get better at what they do. Guides who don't do this stagnate.

 

There are those rare goons running around out there that don't believe in tipping and you know what? There are plenty of guides out there who are a perfect match for them! Like the old saying goes, there is someone for everyone!! Good guides don't work with clients who don't tip. But it's not because good guides are snobs or only interested in working with elite clients. Good guides get good tips. Just like good waiters get good tips. Clients who generally don't tip will be more inclined to give a good tip to a good guide. 

 

Good waiters Don't go to work expecting to get tipped poorly. They work at good restaurants. Generally they handle the better tables also. Preferred or repeat customers generally get the better tables.

 

Good guides are in demand and believe it or not repeat business accounts for a vast majority of the trips they do. Good clients book repeat business. Good guides build their client bases year over year. They highly value their clients and they will do just about anything for them. Their clients are more than just their clients. Their clients become their friends. In fact they treat their clients as if they were family.

 

Your guide is obviously a good guide. You are a obviously a great client. The fact that you are even here asking this question screams, "Hey Guide - whoever you are that is taking this guy out-- Cherish his business. Communicate with him better. Do something to make up for causing him to wonder if he did something wrong. Go above and beyond. Give him the best trip you've ever given anyone in your entire life!!!"

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45 mins ago, CaryGreene said:

A 20% Tip is fair & your guide will appreciate you for doing the right thing. Your post touches on a subject that transcends a person's personal philosophy of tipping. The truth is, we need to examine this conundrum not from the client's point of view but from the guides point of view, because that's where the only answer that matters resides.

 

Whenever I took somebody out for an entire day & gave them a true five-star experience,  I would expect a 20% tip or thereabouts and if I didn't get it then I would do the same thing you are doing. I would look at myself and ask myself if I did something, or even a number of things wrong.

 

This coming from a person who used to guide. I've done a couple hundred trips over the years. Guiding is about creating five-star hospitality but also it's about technical instruction. Most fishermen, no matter how good, if they are being guided, they will benefit from local knowledge on the watershed at the very least. Most people who take guided trips need a lot more than just that in terms of instruction. 

 

If we are talking fresh water we have multiple hatches going on which need to be deciphered. Insects are behaving in all different ways and that translates to how you fish flies. There's a world of knowledge there that can be imparted to a visitor, especially one who might be fishing the watershed for the very first time or maybe someone who just does it a few times a year. 

 

Guiding is all about serving and teaching and making someone smile. Good guides go above and beyond and generally they get tipped well almost every single time they take someone out.

 

Guides who get less than 20% probably served a soggy submarine sandwich from Subway to their client with a straight face, while they pulled the boat over somewhere and the client had to sit on a rock shivering while they ate and drank their can of pop.

 

Take a look across the bank and you'll be daydreaming about two guys sitting in camping chairs, with little buddy heaters set up near them. They're sitting under a pop-up canopy and their guide is serving them an amazing lunch, probably with some wine or beer & some classy touches. Hors d'oeuvres? (Is it so hard for a guide to break out a triscuit with a little cream cheese & shrimp cocktail or perhaps some cool crackers and horseradish cheddar cheese pub spread?)  That's a rhetorical question. The answer is it's not and I guarantee you 95% of all clients would never expect hors d'oeuvres on a fishing trip. But what if? Imagine a trip where the food is so good and the experience was so wonderful that you are left, 20 years later, by far remembering the experience more so than having a few chances to catch a fish.

 

In order for a guide to create that experience he needs to prepare in advance. Imagine a growler full of craft beer being served from chilled mugs. Sure that drives the cost of the trip up a little bit, but then the client gets what they pay for, don't they?

 

The same is true in salt water. A guide who just takes a client out, drives the boat around and hands the client a water or a beer is just a guide. There's a real good chance he won't get a 20% tip.

 

But a guide who makes the day all about you & does everything possible to make sure you're comfortable, safe, hydrated, fed & happy is a 5-Star experience provider. They take numerous pictures of you in action. They ask lots of questions. They take the time to get to know you. They consult with you and find out what you're looking for out of the experience. They make the whole day all about you. 

 

A good guide is so good at fishing in that locale that they can take just about anybody out and catch a few fish. I've seen guides who hang their hat on this concept. They think that the key to the whole trip is at the client catches a fish and in fact, if the client doesn't catch a fish they offer the next trip free. These types of guides miss the entire point of guiding.

 

When you go on a fishing trip it's not called a catching trip. Part of fishing is fishing and sometimes you don't catch. Guides try to avert this at all costs and 90% of the time they certainly can help you succeed. It isn't the act of fishing that a good guide is great at.

 

Good guides create experiences. The kind of experiences clients rave about. Tips take care of themselves.

 

From the guides perspective, if they feel like they did a great job and didn't get a very good tip, if at all, then they should first examine themselves. They may be aware of some of the things they did wrong. They may not be.

 

Good guides survey their clients. They ask for feedback. They want to know if there was anything else they could have done that would have made the trip more enjoyable or more fun?

 

Guides need feedback. Guides need to hone their craft and continually get better at what they do. Guides who don't do this stagnate.

 

There are those rare goons running around out there that don't believe in tipping and you know what? There are plenty of guides out there who are a perfect match for them! Like the old saying goes, there is someone for everyone!! Good guides don't work with clients who don't tip. But it's not because good guides are snobs or only interested in working with elite clients. Good guides get good tips. Just like good waiters get good tips. Clients who generally don't tip will be more inclined to give a good tip to a good guide. 

 

Good waiters Don't go to work expecting to get tipped poorly. They work at good restaurants. Generally they handle the better tables also. Preferred or repeat customers generally get the better tables.

 

Good guides are in demand and believe it or not repeat business accounts for a vast majority of the trips they do. Good clients book repeat business. Good guides build their client bases year over year. They highly value their clients and they will do just about anything for them. Their clients are more than just their clients. Their clients become their friends. In fact they treat their clients as if they were family.

 

Your guide is obviously a good guide. You are a obviously a great client. The fact that you are even here asking this question screams, "Hey Guide - whoever you are that is taking this guy out-- Cherish his business. Communicate with him better. Do something to make up for causing him to wonder if he did something wrong. Go above and beyond. Give him the best trip you've ever given anyone in your entire life!!!"

Great insight. I have been on many, many charter trips in saltwater, some excellent, some just OK, a couple that were so bad I was almost embarrassed for the captain. But in each and every case I have tipped at least 20%. This is because I happen to know many charter captains (again, saltwater) and I know how hard they work; there is a kind of irony there I guess..... the better the charter, the better the reputation, the more trips they get and yes, lots of repeat business. So they have to keep working really hard to maintain their reputation. But the reason I asked this question initially is that I have limited experience on drift trips. I can tell you this: they work their @sses off, rowing all day, repositioning the boat constantly for the optimum drift factoring in wind direction and force, the casting ability of the client, getting out and dragging the boat over rocky shallows with the client still in the boat and many other things. So there is no doubt in my mind that they deserve a decent tip or even more if - and only if - the trip was absolutely spectacular due to the efforts of the guide. The shop owner did get back to me and I booked my two full days on the river and I'm really looking forward to it! 

 

In any case, I do my best to be as low maintenance a client as possible. And I make sure that I tell them how much I appreciate their insights and experience. Sadly, I have heard stories from local charter captains of nightmare clients who look at the guide or captain as nothing more than a servant. Bottom line: it's not hard to be nice.....you are not diminishing your manhood by being so. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, CaryGreene said:

But a guide who makes the day all about you & does everything possible to make sure you're comfortable, safe, hydrated, fed & happy is a 5-Star experience provider. They take numerous pictures of you in action. They ask lots of questions. They take the time to get to know you. They consult with you and find out what you're looking for out of the experience. They make the whole day all about you. 

A five star experience is not what I am looking for when fishing. Having a guide telling me exactly what to do can be helpful but potentially frustrating for the guide and the fisherman. I like to listen or watch a skilled fisherman and most importantly figure it out for myself.

 

A 20% tip is the norm in the USA. 

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I used to be a Drift Boat Captain on the Upper Delaware watershed back in the early 90's & I've guided saltwater also & the 20% rule is a good tip percentage for either. Tipping a guide is very similar to eating out. 

 

Better servers work at better restaurants & they captain better tables & sometimes bigger sections as well. Tipping etiquette applies to numerous service industries and fishing is just one of them. 

 

Good service tends to penetrate the not so nice personalities by providing hospitality at a personalized & high level. I'm sure it can be quite a challenge for some where others may see it as an opportunity to test themselves & eventually wow the client. 

 

I can recall having a few challenging clients and no matter how good the service was, they tipped poorly - in addition to being rather miserable to be around for the day. When I began surveying the clients prior to going out & then sending them a thank you note,a few flies & a survey, I started unlocking things I could do better. Some of those clients that maybe didn't tip up to what I expected or "hoped for" taught me that hoping is not a recipe for getting. To get excellent tips, you have BE excellent. 

 

As far as clients who are not nice, there are usually reasons - mostly baggage. That's why meeting their expectations and being professional is so vital to building a business. It's tempting to be increasingly less responsive, curt & even distant or rude back to some people who have a knack for making a potentially wonderful day on the water more like having a root-canal. A better method of handling them is to stay consistent with your service & maybe give them a little space. The guide will know if ultimately he was successful because there is no better measure of man's success than his paycheck. 

 

Most of the time, guides get paid what they deserved to be paid. One of the steps to building a successful guiding business is to build a great client-base. Doing that takes years of passionate dedication. 

 

It's like going to a barber to get a haircut. If you walk in expecting a $15 "super-cut" but you get the below, I'm pretty sure you'll not only tip a little more but you'll become a raving fan of your great barber. 

 

 

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7 mins ago, Bucko said:

A five star experience is not what I am looking for when fishing. Having a guide telling me exactly what to do can be helpful but potentially frustrating for the guide and the fisherman. I like to listen or watch a skilled fisherman and most importantly figure it out for myself.

 

A 20% tip is the norm in the USA. 

You are absolutely entitled to have your expectations fully met. A good guide would know this about you because they'd take the time to figure out what you were looking for. Then, they'd provide it for you, right down to the soggy sandwich if that all you wanted or expected. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

How about load your wallet with big bills. At days end open said wallet and ask the guide to help himself. Job done.

 

Mike

Edited by Mike Oliver

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Some thoughts.

1. Please stop equating the tipping of a fishing guide and a server in the food industry. Apples and oranges. The food service industry wages are built upon tips. For example, in Idaho a server is taxed on 8% of their sales. And they don't necessarily even get min wage as their base. So if you don't tip your server they are actually paying taxes on money they didn't get. Fishing guides make a decent living strictly based off of their fee. Not suggesting you don't or shouldn't tip a fishing guide. I do all the time, and in fact have only not tipped a guide once in almost 50 years of taking guided trips.

 

2. The tip should be based upon these things:

a. The quality of the equipment provided for the day.

b. The effort the guide put into the day. Did they pole down wind all day or work their butt off to pole into the wind because that kept the sun at the anglers back. Did they row down one side of the river all day or did they row back and forth to put their anglers in the best part of the runs.

c. Did the guide remember rule #1. I AM the paying client. If you berate me all day long because I didn't put the fly right where you wanted it then you can kiss my ass. There is a huge difference between providing some guidance and instruction and muttering WTF are you doing when a client misses a shot. I get the guides perspective. I take all kinds of guys out on my skiff. Some just have no experience in what we are doing. Some just don't have the casting ability and I get frustrated. And I am WRONG to get on their case and a guide is worse. I ain't getting paid, they are.

 

3. I think the 20% is a reasonable guideline but it also depends a whole lot on the upfront cost of the day. Lets compare a couple of situations and for the sake of discussion lets say these two guides are pretty equal in their ability, effort and gear.

a. Saltwater flats guide charging $650/day and a drift boat guide charging the same. If you tip them both the same 20% then the drift boat guide is making out like a bandit compared to the flats guide. The flats guide has a tougher job (don't debate me on this I have rowed drift boats and poled skiffs a lot) and a lot more expenses. Of course its about supply and demand but IMO the freshwater gang has a real racket going on. It used to be a day floating a river was way cheaper then a day on a saltwater skiff. Not the case anymore.

b. Now how about the offshore guys. Much, to me, depends on just what is and is not included in the upfront costs. For example, in the NE if you charter a guy to take you tuna fishing at the end of the day they boat gets the fish not the angler (now thats just insane but that's another topic). Down in the Gulf the angler gets the fish. So if the cost for the day including fuel is roughly the same then the captain in NE is making much more money than the captain in the gulf since he can sell that tuna. That should factor in to your tipping decision.

 

So long winded but my thoughts.

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On 5/17/2021 at 10:20 AM, CaryGreene said:

You are absolutely entitled to have your expectations fully met. A good guide would know this about you because they'd take the time to figure out what you were looking for. Then, they'd provide it for you, right down to the soggy sandwich if that all you wanted or expected. 

Some guides in Southwest Florida have the client/sport/fisherman 

 bring along refreshments.

 

A little brunch provided by the Ritz, canopy,  maybe an antique oriental rug in the Everglades...sounds like a great day of fly fishing.

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So if a flats guide is charging 650 a day then he is easily taking home 500 plus a day which seems like a good pay day imo . How much are these guys supposed to make per day? I do a roof for someone I charge accordingly and don't expect  a tip at all. 

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