hipkvw

Scott rod warranty...other company questions.

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38 posts in this topic

10 mins ago, hipkvw said:

I like the rods a lot but I am not sure if I am going to go with them again after the response that the rod cant handle a 200-250gr line. Makes no sense. 

Ya' think!? (said with eyebrows raised). Sounds like you should do a little research and come up with a company that takes a hell of a lot better care of you and makes a product that can handle your intended applications. 

 

Every fly rod has a kind of sweet spot, depending on the rods weight rating and the type of blanket is. Throwing weighted lines certainly generates very high line speeds and when you are checking and ducking you need a rod that can easily handle some load - especially if you are using multiple piece travel rods, which by the way - is totally reasonable to do. 

 

Smaller companies probably don't do a ton of breakage research and of course breakage happens mostly at the ferrule. Companies that do a lot of r&d take great lengths to design ferrules they can handle loads within certain tolerances that the rods are designed to respond to. 

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On 5/14/2021 at 2:18 AM, sms said:

I think Paul Arden is right. He is extremely picky about his rods how they cast and fish. Much much pickier than I am. In his latest Sexyloops front page he wrote:

I have also been told that back in the day, one was able to get the top materials when building (fly) rods. Nowadays the apparently go to aerospace.

I had an old B&W 16' #9-10 Walker TH rod. It is probably the strongest vs weight of all TH rods I've come across. And it was not just due to the light reel seat - the upper sections were light too! And it was not brittle, this was cut to 15'1" and used for competition spey casting - and still is by a friend of mine.

 

XP was a great rod series - at least the models I've tried are. And the 590-4 is a real classic at least in some circles.

Some chase exact models and may pay top dollar. Even knowing they take a risk of breakage that may be more costly than newer rod.

 

Perhaps manufacturers should, when they hit a gem, freeze the design and then just every now and then rebrand; new series name, different fittings and color. Maybe they do?

GLoomis kept some GLX rods in the line-up for a long time. Some time after they discontinued it, they brought it back as GLX classic. I believe not on the menu anymore thou.

I literally presented the notion of keeping certain rod series around to Far Banks Enterprises & they kind of turned their noses up at it and we went on to the next subject. 

 

There are actually a number of ways this could be done. Firstly, they might keep every single thing about the blank the same and also keep the name of the blank. For example the Z Axis was a kick ****** series for freshwater fishing.

 

Take the same exact blank, reintroduce it and maybe scale back the components and offer it as midpriced rod. $350. BAM. It would sound like hotcakes. 

 

I guess I wasn't wearing board shorts and a t-shirt when I presented the idea. LOL

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1 hour ago, CaryGreene said:

Ya' think!? (said with eyebrows raised). Sounds like you should do a little research and come up with a company that takes a hell of a lot better care of you and makes a product that can handle your intended applications. 

 

Every fly rod has a kind of sweet spot, depending on the rods weight rating and the type of blanket is. Throwing weighted lines certainly generates very high line speeds and when you are checking and ducking you need a rod that can easily handle some load - especially if you are using multiple piece travel rods, which by the way - is totally reasonable to do. 

 

Smaller companies probably don't do a ton of breakage research and of course breakage happens mostly at the ferrule. Companies that do a lot of r&d take great lengths to design ferrules they can handle loads within certain tolerances that the rods are designed to respond to. 

I have 3 Scotts and 12 Sage rods. Probably go with Sage at this point. 

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39 mins ago, hipkvw said:

I have 3 Scotts and 12 Sage rods. Probably go with Sage at this point. 

I'm never one to endorse any particular rod publicly, mainly because there's so many really good rods out there.

 

Most important thing is that the rods don't fail you and that you're happy with them and also the warranties that accompany them.

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The male ferrule on the butt has a good chance of breaking if you are fishing with a loose ferrule fitting.

Herb

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1 hour ago, HL said:

The male ferrule on the butt has a good chance of breaking if you are fishing with a loose ferrule fitting.

Herb

I told them that last time and asked them again to check it. 

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Cary,

 

If we take Sage hard to see how they could reduce the component cost,

 

Even on their flagship rods like the Ignitor they do not use a high grade guide like a Fuji Torzite for the stripper. They use routinely snake guides. Even from the best makers these prehistoric bits of twisted wire are incredibly cheap. Reel seats in OEM volumes are not expensive which leaves the cork handle. These are almost certainly pre formed and brought in. Maybe a few dollars could be shaved off here.

 

It is interesting that Sage and I really rate and thank them for this can roll you a new blank section for a very old classic rod. Now pre preg does not have a long shelf life. This kinda leads me to think that these pre pregs  continue to be used today on production models. No problem with that. IM6 has been around a long time. But it’s qualities are by now very well understood and very good rods are still being built with it alongside IM8.

 

I had a soft spot for the Z Axis in the 9’ 6” 7 wt. A very strong rod but it is heavy compared to my Daiwa rod same length and line wight. But for your steelhead that’s is my rod of choice. Weight is not everything.

 

My 25 year I old RSP are relevant today. Great light fast rods. The XP a great range and the SL is a classic and great SeaTrout rod for night fishing. Not too quick. The Xi3 great range of salt water rods a definite step up from the Xi2.
I just could not keep up after the Xi3 and changed over to CTS blanks for my 9 and 10 wts.

 

If the Ignitor in the 9 and 10 are in the same vein as the 6 wt I would love to find a way to afford them as blanks. Snakes on a salt water rod no thanks.

 

Having spent the last year taking lessons from and casting with a Master Instructor  it is clear to me that very high line speeds can be achieved with both sinking and floating lines. It is 100% about the caster. What I often see on the beach are guys struggling to put sinking lines into the air and then have a poor stroke to get them moving. Cause bad casting and very often the rod is silly over lined.

There should be no more stress on a given fly rod that is cast properly with either a floater or a sinker of the same mass.

For guys who do manage to over power a sinker then they have drift to take the bounce out on the back cast. Or use an elliptical casting stroke.

For a maker to say their rod is not up to a sinking line is pretty preposterous.
Herb makes a good point that loose fitting ferrules can be a cause of breakage.
Not necessarily a poor fit in terms of manufacture but when a joint works loose by dint of casting.

Rod makers can’t control what happens to them once they have left their factory. If three rods broke at the same point then one would rightly think they would want to find out why and work with the Angler.

Anyway it’s time I took my pills. 
cheers

 

Mike

 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

18 yrs. ago at the Marlbough show. Thought I over paid at $210. Scott SAS 9.6 8wt. 2 pc. bought for steelhead, then stripers, snook, redish, small tarpon, flawless for problems, A lot of todays rod are super fast at the risk of fractures, ferrule problems. In the days of IM 5-9 rod blanks the 7-8 were warriors, 9's up couldn't take the cold

Edited by RAW

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