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NMurray

Casting - Marginal Gains

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I'm sure this is well this is all well-trodden territory here as it is with just about every subject. I'm curious about how far the average person can cast and how much the various variables can effect distance.

 

As I understand it, distance is effected by a casters form, many people, like me, suck; rod type, action and guide layout; lure your throwing; reel, spool diameter; line type, braid, flat or round; and casters form. I'm sure there are others. I'm not looking to figure out the maximum distance someone can cast just a judgement of how much some of these variable matter more than others.

 

Let's reduce some of the variables. Let's say take your average caster and give them an 11' Tsunami Airwave Elite 11' rod with a Daiwa Saltist 5000 casting a 2oz hopkins. Seems like a decent middle of the rod set-up that an average caster could get their most distance out of. One variable that could easily be adjusted is line type. I've heard an argument for lighter braids or flat weave lines like fireline get you more distance. If true, how much? an extra 10yards? 20? Sure sometimes the fish are at the end of the cast, way out there. Is line choice really going to make that big a difference?

What about rod length? Everything the same as above but change the rod length. Go from an AWE 11' to a 9'. How much further is the longer rod going to send it in the hands of the average caster.

 

I'm not looking to determine the maximum distance a competition caster can send it on the optimal setup but for the average fisherman, messing with the mix, what are small changes we can make to get more distance and is it even worth sweating?

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I’m not a long ball hitter. With an off shore wind after the cast has started to drop stop the cast. The wind will carry your lure further. The trajectory changes when the line stops going out it straightens out. 

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Given my approach to fishing & life, I’m a complete hypocrite to say this to anyone else but i will anyway in this case....

 

Try not to overthink it. 

 

Otherwise.
Too open ended of a hypothetical thing for my money. There’s also the way the reel pairs with the rod, the guides, the guide layout, cast style/type, how long of a leader etc. 

 

My impression has been that some shorter rods have outcasted longer rods if the weight is in the sweet spot for one not the other.
 

Another personal experience is that lighter line only gives 2-3 feet extra for most situations. Same exact kind of rod blank style, guides, etc, and two feet longer blank might mean 5’ in distance. Maybe more but you won’t know until you try and it’s going to differ from one blank to the next. And moderate action blanks can sometimes cast as well or better than faster action if you are used to the way they load. 

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@EricDice That was all my assumption and I'm not really getting wrapped around the axle on this one, just curious how much these various things effect the distance. I'm not even looking to make any changes just curious. I'm sure good form has much more to do with things than ALL of the variables.

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The biggest factors are likely lure selection and wind, but you're right way too many variables and everyone has an opinion. Going to a longer, high end surf rod will probably help the most but I'd just work on your casting form and don't overthink it. 

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I haven't found any videos or experiments trying to determine these effects, and I was always curious myself. Don't overthink it is not an answer, obviously. I'd love to know what type of distance you could gain from going to a longer rod or switching to a lighter braid. Whoever jumps on this first with a somewhat scientific approach might get some serious views on youtube, if they are into monetizing it.

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13 hours ago, NMurray said:

I'm sure this is well this is all well-trodden territory here as it is with just about every subject. I'm curious about how far the average person can cast and how much the various variables can effect distance.

 

As I understand it, distance is effected by a casters form, many people, like me, suck; rod type, action and guide layout; lure your throwing; reel, spool diameter; line type, braid, flat or round; and casters form. I'm sure there are others. I'm not looking to figure out the maximum distance someone can cast just a judgement of how much some of these variable matter more than others.

 

Let's reduce some of the variables. Let's say take your average caster and give them an 11' Tsunami Airwave Elite 11' rod with a Daiwa Saltist 5000 casting a 2oz hopkins. Seems like a decent middle of the rod set-up that an average caster could get their most distance out of. One variable that could easily be adjusted is line type. I've heard an argument for lighter braids or flat weave lines like fireline get you more distance. If true, how much? an extra 10yards? 20? Sure sometimes the fish are at the end of the cast, way out there. Is line choice really going to make that big a difference?

What about rod length? Everything the same as above but change the rod length. Go from an AWE 11' to a 9'. How much further is the longer rod going to send it in the hands of the average caster.

 

I'm not looking to determine the maximum distance a competition caster can send it on the optimal setup but for the average fisherman, messing with the mix, what are small changes we can make to get more distance and is it even worth sweating?

A persons casting ability(getting the most out the load action and 2 handed correct launch, big difference) my 2 cts.

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45 mins ago, ifishthebadspots said:

I haven't found any videos or experiments trying to determine these effects, and I was always curious myself. Don't overthink it is not an answer, obviously. I'd love to know what type of distance you could gain from going to a longer rod or switching to a lighter braid. Whoever jumps on this first with a somewhat scientific approach might get some serious views on youtube, if they are into monetizing it.

Agreed. I'm not overthinking it as in so much as I'm not really worrying about it for the sake of fishing but I think it's interesting and would be fun to test out. I was curious if anyone out here had done any experimenting to determine these factors.

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Go to a field with several rods and reels. Place a cone at 75 or 100 yards and cast away. Try all the different combinations of rod, reel, line, casting styles, weight, etc. and see what works best for YOU.

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On 5/10/2021 at 9:37 PM, NMurray said:

I'm sure this is well this is all well-trodden territory here as it is with just about every subject. I'm curious about how far the average person can cast and how much the various variables can effect distance.

 

As I understand it, distance is effected by a casters form, many people, like me, suck; rod type, action and guide layout; lure your throwing; reel, spool diameter; line type, braid, flat or round; and casters form. I'm sure there are others. I'm not looking to figure out the maximum distance someone can cast just a judgement of how much some of these variable matter more than others.

 

Let's reduce some of the variables. Let's say take your average caster and give them an 11' Tsunami Airwave Elite 11' rod with a Daiwa Saltist 5000 casting a 2oz hopkins. Seems like a decent middle of the rod set-up that an average caster could get their most distance out of. One variable that could easily be adjusted is line type. I've heard an argument for lighter braids or flat weave lines like fireline get you more distance. If true, how much? an extra 10yards? 20? Sure sometimes the fish are at the end of the cast, way out there. Is line choice really going to make that big a difference?

What about rod length? Everything the same as above but change the rod length. Go from an AWE 11' to a 9'. How much further is the longer rod going to send it in the hands of the average caster.

 

I'm not looking to determine the maximum distance a competition caster can send it on the optimal setup but for the average fisherman, messing with the mix, what are small changes we can make to get more distance and is it even worth sweating?

In order to get the most out of any outfit you need to match the reel to the rod first and then then line to the task at hand. In the hands of a reasonably competent caster, there should be a significant difference between your 11 foot setup with 20lb or 30lb braid than there would be with 40 or 50lb braid. The difference is really going to depend on the payload and how well it flies AND how well the rod pushes it. The only sense in taking out a yardstick would be for one particular lure under one particular set of conditions, however, I will argue that no matter the variables, the lighter line will always achieve better distance. If you are chucking tin or highly aerodynamic lures like a SS Littleneck or Roberts Ranger it should be very significant under ideal conditions.

As far as leaving everything the same but dropping the rod to 9 ft goes....this represents a key issue. First off, there has never been a reel IMO that pairs properly with an 11 footer and a 9 footer. So now you would have is a mismatched outfit and I would never expect performance to be the best it can be. When it comes to rod length, in the hands of a reasonably competent caster, longer will always trump shorter. It's physics. If you come across a situation where it doesn't, it most likely can be traced back to a poorly matched reel to the rod which I see constantly.

For what it's worth, the AW Elite and the 5K Saltist is a very good pairing.

 

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My take on it about casting reels is that correct form and function when you cast is really out of bounds because the average fisherman doesn't really have those skills in the form for cast correctly simply due to the fact that they weren't taught how to cast correctly.

I fish with casting reels exclusively simply because I like doing it that way and I cannot stand the big handle big rotating mask of a spinning reel.

Now with the Advent of braided super lines the spending real guys have set their distance way up where as many years ago before braided lines the casting real guys had the advantage especially in capable hands.

I was told many years ago that if I tried a casting reel for plugging I wouldn't go back to the spinner,, well you already told me was right cuz that was before braided line.

I do good with them and I do very well with them and I'm sticking to them.

That's just my $1.50 on the subject.

HH

 

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