dmac95

Nissequogue DEC Boat Ramp

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Got a question for the folks. I've kayaked on the sound side of smithtown and saw/heard something about a heavy current with very shallow water on peak outgoing tide in the Nissequogue river.

 

I plan on taking my family out there and don't want to experience the oh sh*t water moments where water is pushing my boat and is about to beach it. For those of you who know about the Stony Brook boat ramp and trying to make it out on an incoming tide, that's about a 6 knot current running through it so you know what I'm talking about.

 

This isn't a question of "what fish are here". I've fished there for many years and know that the sea robbin situation stinks, but I've always launched kayaks off the beach (and 1 time in stony brook ramp -never again) and never in nissequogue on low tide. Anyone care to help here with where to NOT go or what time to absolutely avoid? Is it anything like the purpoise channel in Stony Brook where  you gotta go 20 knots out the river and have only about 15 feet of clearance (if you dont want to beach the boat) to make it out to the sound? 

 

I don't want to die. Not yet. The two other DEC ramps in the sound are very safe, but this one looks about 15min closer to home (if the brooklynites start driving in huntington this summer, then the other two it is).

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The Nissequogue DEC boat ramp is tucked inside the State Park and out of current.  The kayak launch is also back there behind the Marina.  Low and moon tides can leave these areas with little or no water and mud.  Kayaking the river mouth area can be extremely dangerous to the unsuspecting.  I would not bring a family, kids, wife etc to this area without having an extreme knowledge of the currents and to a lesser extent tides for all involved.  I have seen very experienced boaters and kayakers get into very bad and nearly fatal situations in the area.  The Smithtown Ramp, located almost in the inlet proper, and the fingers being perpendicular to the current is the usual culprit but the entire area is very dangerous.  This area is a much different animal than Stony Brook as the further back in Stony Brook you go the less current you have.  The Nissequogue has strong currents miles up river.

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3 hours ago, RocksMeEasy said:

The Nissequogue DEC boat ramp is tucked inside the State Park and out of current.  The kayak launch is also back there behind the Marina.  Low and moon tides can leave these areas with little or no water and mud.  Kayaking the river mouth area can be extremely dangerous to the unsuspecting.  I would not bring a family, kids, wife etc to this area without having an extreme knowledge of the currents and to a lesser extent tides for all involved.  I have seen very experienced boaters and kayakers get into very bad and nearly fatal situations in the area.  The Smithtown Ramp, located almost in the inlet proper, and the fingers being perpendicular to the current is the usual culprit but the entire area is very dangerous.  This area is a much different animal than Stony Brook as the further back in Stony Brook you go the less current you have.  The Nissequogue has strong currents miles up river.

Fairly certain the boat ramp in nissy state park is for kayak and canoe only, no boats.

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5 mins ago, ThrowinPlugs said:

Fairly certain the boat ramp in nissy state park is for kayak and canoe only, no boats.

North side for kayaks.  South side for boats/trailers.

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13 mins ago, RocksMeEasy said:

North side for kayaks.  South side for boats/trailers.

 

3 hours ago, RocksMeEasy said:

The Nissequogue DEC boat ramp is tucked inside the State Park and out of current.  The kayak launch is also back there behind the Marina.  Low and moon tides can leave these areas with little or no water and mud.  Kayaking the river mouth area can be extremely dangerous to the unsuspecting.  I would not bring a family, kids, wife etc to this area without having an extreme knowledge of the currents and to a lesser extent tides for all involved.  I have seen very experienced boaters and kayakers get into very bad and nearly fatal situations in the area.  The Smithtown Ramp, located almost in the inlet proper, and the fingers being perpendicular to the current is the usual culprit but the entire area is very dangerous.  This area is a much different animal than Stony Brook as the further back in Stony Brook you go the less current you have.  The Nissequogue has strong currents miles up river.

I plan on taking out the boat off that Nissequogue DEC boat ramp, south side. I'm primarily interested in going out into the sound from that south ramp. 

 

Are you saying that if i travel north from the boat ramp (well, first east into the creek/river - out of the boat ramp), I'd have to gas it to take it out on a incoming tide or are you saying that sometimes there is not water left in that area to begin with so i'll likely beach the boat on a sandbar. 

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2 mins ago, dmac95 said:

 

I plan on taking out the boat off that Nissequogue DEC boat ramp, south side. I'm primarily interested in going out into the sound from that south ramp. 

 

Are you saying that if i travel north from the boat ramp (well, first east into the creek/river - out of the boat ramp), I'd have to gas it to take it out on a incoming tide or are you saying that sometimes there is not water left in that area to begin with so i'll likely beach the boat on a sandbar. 

In my opinion a captain needs extreme local knowledge to operate a boat from that ramp out into the sound and back based on varying moon, tide, and current.  Wrong combination you could easily land your boat on a bar from the Marina channel to the Sound.  Operating around high water slack is almost required for all the boats moored and in the marina.

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6 mins ago, RocksMeEasy said:

In my opinion a captain needs extreme local knowledge to operate a boat from that ramp out into the sound and back based on varying moon, tide, and current.  Wrong combination you could easily land your boat on a bar from the Marina channel to the Sound.  Operating around high water slack is almost required for all the boats moored and in the marina.

I had that hunch since before I posted, hence why I posted here. I primarily fish off Mattituck and Oyster Bay and wondered if there is something in the middle worth checking out that's not a 40 car line (PJ) and that's not going to require me to have 16/9 broadcasting on the launch. 

 

Shame. I'll go check out the Town ramp variant north of it on a low tide just to see what it's all about. Thank you for the info. Probably saved a life or two.

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12 hours ago, Brim Gribley said:

no joke

you guys are scaring me. im planning on going out this week in the afternoon.

I spoke with a few locals and they all said that as long as I'm careful, i can make it out even on low tide as long as I stay close to the moorings. 

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Although I don’t  have a boat, I grew up on the Nissy and it’s definitely no joke. For 30+ years Ive fished on foot all along the river as well as kayak and inflatable skiff. Theres a lot of water going through a very narrow channel at the mouth makes for an extremely fast current with some crazy sandbars. I’ve had my own close calls out on the sandbars (almost hit by a boat while wading!, caught on bar in rising moon tide) 

 

My buddy has his boat in the DEC slip in the back and at low tide, we don’t even go out. People always stuck at low. If you go out around high tide, the current will be down and the water high. That’s what I would do. If fishing, With a kayak, Or small boat, I would just stay inside the river and skip the Sound. The State ramps in the back are out of the swift current which is why they moved the Kayakers back there. The launch used to be at KP Bluff but it’s just not a good place for inexperienced. We rescued a guy who got sucked under the dock with his kayak on a whipping incoming tide. He was coming in fast and put his foot out to stop against the dock and completely dumped and went under with just his head and arms hanging on to the side of dock. Saw a teenage girl do similar.

 

Go out around the high tide and you will be fine have a good time. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Stripsettter said:

Although I don’t  have a boat, I grew up on the Nissy and it’s definitely no joke. For 30+ years Ive fished on foot all along the river as well as kayak and inflatable skiff. Theres a lot of water going through a very narrow channel at the mouth makes for an extremely fast current with some crazy sandbars. I’ve had my own close calls out on the sandbars (almost hit by a boat while wading!, caught on bar in rising moon tide) 

 

My buddy has his boat in the DEC slip in the back and at low tide, we don’t even go out. People always stuck at low. If you go out around high tide, the current will be down and the water high. That’s what I would do. If fishing, With a kayak, Or small boat, I would just stay inside the river and skip the Sound. The State ramps in the back are out of the swift current which is why they moved the Kayakers back there. The launch used to be at KP Bluff but it’s just not a good place for inexperienced. We rescued a guy who got sucked under the dock with his kayak on a whipping incoming tide. He was coming in fast and put his foot out to stop against the dock and completely dumped and went under with just his head and arms hanging on to the side of dock. Saw a teenage girl do similar.

 

Go out around the high tide and you will be fine have a good time. 

 

 

If you go out say on high tide, doesnt that mean you have about ~3.5 hours on the water since you want to be back ~2.5 hours before low tide - and if so wouldn't that mean the best time from tide perspective be from ~3.5 hours before high tide to 3.5 hours after high tide (total 7 hours on water)? Now if we do this we'd be avoiding low water but at the same time going out on a hard current. 

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