JimG

Possible explanation for the extreme violence from the left

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This popped in to my newsfeed today.  As fishermen and outdoorsman here on this site, I thought that many of you could relate to the experience and relationship we all have  with nature and how it impacts the soul.  For me, at least fishing is a spiritual experience.  It's time to reflect, appreciate life and ponder issues larger than ourselves... and standing on a beach before sunrise is a humbling if not religious experience that an urban lifestyle could never accomplish.

 

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People who feel less connected to nature tend to have heightened levels of psychopathic personality traits, according to new research published in the Journal of Environmental Psychology. The study also found that individual who exhibit more dark personality traits prefer to reside in urban areas rather than suburban or rural areas.

“Our relationship with nature is a well-documented and timeless experience that is becoming increasing strained due to fast-paced living, hectic life schedules, and an emphasis on convenience,” said study author Dean Fido, MSc Forensic Psychology Programme Lead at the University of Derby.

“However, what we do know about individuals with high degrees of connection with nature is that said individuals are often healthier, have better perceptions of themselves and their body, show greater levels of empathy towards others, and importantly, report fewer instances of stress, anxiety, and depression.”

 

....

 

Is the urban left v the suburban and rural right more than just different values.   Is urban living literally damaging people so much that they are more likely psychopaths?

 

We all know that in urban settings they just step over homeless, they beat each other senseless over trivial issues like being Asian or white.    They throw batteries at Santa.   

We laugh at it but maybe they are truly damaged

 
Edited by JimG

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I guess everything has changed since 2018? It's always comforting to generalize things, but rarely accurate..

 

from Chicago Tribune;

Mass school shootings mostly happening in small-town America

By LISA MARIE PANE

ASSOCIATED PRESS |

MAY 22, 2018 AT 9:19 AM

Santa Fe High School shooting

Carissa Potts hugs her 7-year-old daughter Kaylee after leaving flowers at a small memorial outside of Santa Fe High School on May 19, 2018, in Santa Fe, Texas. (Scott Olson / Getty Images)

1 / 36

ATLANTA — If you want to know where mass school shootings are most likely to occur, look no farther than small-town and suburban America.

The massacre that killed 10 people at a high school in Texas last week was just the latest to happen in a small or suburban city. Of the 10 deadliest school shootings in the U.S., all but one took place in a town with fewer than 75,000 residents and the vast majority of them were in cities with fewer than 50,000 people.

00:0405:09

These are seemingly idyllic places to grow up: low crime rates, good schools and a sense of community where everyone seems to know your name. And it's exactly those attributes, experts say, that are why small rural and suburban towns are a breeding ground for the next school shooter.

"Ironically it's people in small towns and suburbia who think it can't happen here. And that is exactly the type of place where it does happen," said Peter Langman, a psychologist who has been studying school shootings for years and operates a database of school gun violence in the U.S. and abroad. "People tend to think of violence associated with cities, not violence associated with small-town America, but this type of violence is the one associated with small-town America."

Experts say the phenomenon is due to a variety of factors that include easy access to guns and the copycat effect of disturbed suburban and small-town teenagers emulating each other. It's also blamed on the pressures of living in small towns that make it harder for disgruntled teenagers to adjust.

"In small-town America, it's said everybody knows everybody, and that's well and good except when you don't want everybody to know what's going on with you," said James Alan Fox, a professor at Northeastern University who has been studying mass shootings for decades. "If things are going downhill for you, you did something wrong or someone did something wrong to you and some girl dumps you, everybody knows. So it's much harder to get away from it.

"Whereas in the big city, where no one knows your name, that can be a good thing," he added. "You don't have this feeling that everybody knows what you're going through. Being in a small town has its advantages in terms of a network and a sense of community but sometimes that can be a double-edged sword."

Parkland, Florida, where authorities say a former student in February gunned down 17 people, had just recently been voted the safest town in Florida. Newtown, Connecticut, where a shooting in 2012 at Sandy Hook Elementary School took the lives of 20 children and six adults, is a classic New England town, seemingly a world away from the crime and problems of nearby Bridgeport, one of that state's largest cities.

The site of the Columbine High School tragedy was a Denver suburb, the Virginia Tech massacre happened in a college town of about 40,000 people. The shooting last week took place in a town of 13,000 people about 40 minutes southeast of Houston.

The prevalence of the mass shootings in smaller cities stands in contrast to the situation in big cities like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles. They have strict gun laws and their own problems with street gun violence, but it's rare that a mass shooting has been carried out in one of their schools.

In the 1980s and 1990s, urban districts sought to make schools safer from drug- and gang-related violence, taking such steps as installing metal detectors at entrances. That is exactly what pro-gun Republicans and the National Rifle Association have been proposing in the wake of recent massacres.

Some school security and psychology experts, as well as those who have been studying mass shootings for decades, say school designs and talk of arming teachers is a simplistic approach that doesn't get at the heart of preventing it from happening. While students often have a sense that a classmate might be planning an attack or know that someone is troubled, they might be more hesitant in smaller towns to tell anyone about it, said Langman, director of SchoolShooters.info. They know each other well, visit each other's homes and families can be business associates.

"The best prevention is to catch them early before they show up with a gun rather than trying to make it hard for them once they're already at the building with a gun," he said.

Fox also said it's hard to overlook the issue of copycats — and how much that can determine the types of locations where school shootings occur.

"They're all white, male, teenagers in small towns or rural areas because they identify the other white, male teenagers in small towns or rural areas. Whereas a black kid in the Bronx or the streets of Chicago, that's not his world. He's got totally different issues he's dealing with," Fox said.

 

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Mass school shootings, while terrible are extremely rare instances of violence.  In my 25 or so years of living in the suburbs and working in NYC I have seen some ridiculous violence in the city while just walking down the street and never see anything like that in the burbs.

 

So perhaps school shootings are an outlier and I would bet only an outlier if we ignore all the gang violence in city schools. 

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17 mins ago, JimG said:

Mass school shootings, while terrible are extremely rare instances of violence.  In my 25 or so years of living in the suburbs and working in NYC I have seen some ridiculous violence in the city while just walking down the street and never see anything like that in the burbs.

 

So perhaps school shootings are an outlier and I would bet only an outlier if we ignore all the gang violence in city schools. 

Yeah....MA has had zero school shootings. It's not a thing. Stormy made a dumb point. 

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MSM has conditioned many people to think of school shootings as the premier example of violence in America when in fact those shooting are so rare as to be statistically irrelevant.

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Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after,” Henry David Thoreau.

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Maybe it's a byproduct of being repressed and held down by their Democrat overlords.

 

And being brainwashed into thinking it's the Republicans fault for their situation and only electing Democrats can fix them.

 

or maybe they're just uncivilized savages. 

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49 mins ago, Mokes said:

Yeah....MA has had zero school shootings. It's not a thing. Stormy made a dumb point. 

I'm sure there is relevance in the MA comment, but not sure what it is. Do you consider it rural? Personally I don't really care if gang members kill each other (and I doubt anyone here really does either). 

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25 mins ago, stormy monday said:

I'm sure there is relevance in the MA comment, but not sure what it is. Do you consider it rural? Personally I don't really care if gang members kill each other (and I doubt anyone here really does either). 

I live in Philly. Gang members don’t care about shot placement.  They are killing and injuring plenty of innocent people as well. 
And here’s more food for thought ....

If leftists say they don’t care if gang members kill each other, then why do they BurnLootMurder when a cop kills a gang member, or a criminal scum bag? 

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15 mins ago, Slacker said:

I could see living in a city making people nuts.

Choosing that lifestyle to begin with is nuts.

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1 hour ago, stormy monday said:

I'm sure there is relevance in the MA comment, but not sure what it is. Do you consider it rural? Personally I don't really care if gang members kill each other (and I doubt anyone here really does either). 

Do you consider MA not rural? Maybe you've never been here? Boston doesn't count. 

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47 mins ago, Slacker said:

I could see living in a city making people nuts.

I did it before we bought our little ranch in my little country town. 2 attempted home invasions next door. 1 person tried breaking in our place. I literally had to rack the shottie to scare him off. Fights in the middle of the street all the time. And this was the GOOD part of the city lololol!!! 

 

All races and colors btw. Turns out the white dude upstairs was a wanted pedo who went on the run at 12am with a Uhaul with his fat girlfriend. 

I effing HATE the city and eveyone in it. Whatever, lol. I'm a jerk. I don't care. 

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31 mins ago, ridenfish said:

I live in Philly. Gang members don’t care about shot placement.  They are killing and injuring plenty of innocent people as well. 
And here’s more food for thought ....

If leftists say they don’t care if gang members kill each other, then why do they BurnLootMurder when a cop kills a gang member, or a criminal scum bag? 

Wouldn't gang members senselessly killing each other support the theory in the article that urban living lends itself to more psychopaths in society?

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2 hours ago, Mokes said:

Do you consider MA not rural? Maybe you've never been here? Boston doesn't count. 

Uh yeah I've been there. I served on juries for sexual assault, rape and kidnapping in Salem court and have spent too much time in Lowell Housing Court as a landlord. Mass residents will know what that means, but for others it means I have little tolerance for lowlifes of any shade or belief set. The Berkshires are rural if that's what you mean, but despite being born in Pittsfield I'm more familiar with pre-gentrified Salem, Lynn, Peabody, Lawrence. Having someone pull out a gun while you're playing a gig in Lynn wasn't even a reason to blink when I was there, but maybe things have changed...

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