PeteA

Rinsing off gear: When, where, how, with what???

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If you use the search, this past winter a guy on here I remember had a thread.

 

He took a pump sprayer, cut the nozzle off, and with proper fittings attached a regular garden hose nozzle. After his thread I actually went and bought a few sprayers to do the same to, but haven’t built them yet.

 

There’s also companies now making battery powered sprayers in different sizes for like camping, etc that would work great. They are expensive however I believe, although I’m positive one could make their own one of those too.

 

Having said all that, it’s definitely a good idea to rinse your gear off. My old man taught me that, always rinse the gear, and scrub the boat, and I still have rods/reels of his that are 20-30 years old, and the 30 year old boat that actually looks cleaner than some new boats out there.

 

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I carry a few jugs of water. I rinse and wipe down as soon as I get back to the car every time I fish. Every once in a while I break things down spray with salt x and clean thoroughly and re-grease.

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i try to rinse off after each outing, but luckily my home base is mainly where I fish so when I get back I lay everything out (rods with reels on them and all the lures used) and hose them off. Let them air dry then pack them away / store.

 

If I'm gone somewhere for a weekend, I don't stress about not rinsing off each outing, tough enough to squeak away from the family to fish, let alone the extra time to rinse off when I get back haha, so I just do a good rinsing before I pack up to head home. Not the end of the world for me if its a day or two without a rinse, just try to be more thorough when cleaning off after these trips though.

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This is a good question I was thinking the same thing in the colder months when water was turned off a lot of places outdoors. I will try some kind of pump sprayer as well. 

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After normal casting,, not dunking,, not underwater or in the sand,, you don't need to rinse. Spray the reel with WD-40 or other oil. Wipe with a cloth.  You can rinse your guides or spray and wipe with glass plus or similar cleaner to get the salt off.

 

Spraying spinning reels with a hose can end up with water in the drag washers and rust. I know this.

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2 hours ago, afterhours said:

 

Add  little Salt X to water and you're good to go. It takes like 2 minutes to do and your gear will thank you.

Great advice here from AH. Regular maintenance goes a long way towards extending the life of reels.

 

Quicksilver 2-4-C Marine Grease coverage and exposed Chrome parts  with Salt-X rinse after every use stops corrosion in its tracks.

 

Salt-X will give you the best results & I've compared it to others, such as Salt-Away and feel Salt-X, over time, is absolutely the way to go.

 

You can mix it with water & fill a little hand pump sprayer that you might get at the dollar store. 

 

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Simply coat your gear after use with a gentle misting from the sprayer containing the water and Salt-X solution. Allow it to work for a few minutes and then come back and spray it down with either a garden hose and your finger, or a misting nozzle or if you're on a several day trip just fill another hand pump bottle with plain water and rinse off your equipment that way. It works perfect. 

 

I usually set everything out to dry if possible after I'm done. I have very expensive custom reels and rods, all designed to be used in saltwater. I keep everything in pristine condition by spending 5 minutes to rinse down my equipment.

 

Lures & plugs also absolutely appreciate a quick rinsing. No need to use Salt-X on them. A nice technique for the lures is if you store them in a rectangular milk crate. Get some 3x4 industrial downspout and cut it to fit inside the crate (try to leave at least 2 in so that certain plugs like needle fish have enough room to stick up slightly). You can hang all of your plugs in the milk crate and just hit it with a spray real fast and then just leave it out to dry. 

 

**Side Note: Custom Rectangular Milk Crates are perfect for fat tire fishing dollies (which make it WAYYY easier to walk long distances on any beach and they allow you to carry all kinds of things like chairs, coolers, rods..etc), pickup trucks, kayaks, fishing bikes, ATV's & boats. They are very lightweight, stackable and they can fit a whopping (16) 3"x4" Down-Spout inserts, which you can custom cut using a chop saw from the 10' lengths that it is typically sold in. 

 

PXL_20210505_141032504.jpg.a5a46f401a4ef8c438669df6f96bb2a1.jpg

 

One Downspout sleeve will hold 6 to 12 plugs easily. A stack of a half dozen or a dozen milk crates, each equipped with downspout, can be stored in the corner of any garage or shed or basement very easily. 

 

Some extra strength crates, like the ones I use from Farm- Plast, have solid rectangular spots on both sides of the crate for custom print labels. From an industrial perspective any company that wants their logo stamped on each crate that's a good feature to maybe somehow reduce theft but I love the rectangular logo spot because you can stencil in whatever words you want and then hit it with white spray paint. I went that rout for storage purposes so I stenciled words like "Mullet" "Bunker" "Herring" "Mackerel" "All White" "SandEel" ".308 Ammo" "12 Gage Shells" ".50 Cal' ".HMR-17"  & on & on.

 

Eventually I designated one crate for plugs that needed repair work of whatever sort (new flag tails, new hooks..etc). That one stays near my workbench. 

 

Rectangular crates typically measure 18 and 3/4' x 13" x 11". If you cut your downspout @ 8 1/2" that should be about perfect for almost any plug assortment. Again the reason for cutting the downspout a little short is so the crates remain stackable. Some plugs will invariably stick up quite far & this can cause them not to stack well. Obviously if you have a real oddball plug you may need to custom cut the sleeve you're going to store that plug in.

 

Another thing about the rectangular milk crates, opposed to square ones is that they fit more and that's quite the bonus as you can dedicate one for wading boots, waders, wading jackets & collapsible staffs, night lights, hats, gloves, neoprene socks...etc. 

 

I use them for all sorts of storage like camping pots and pans, tents, fuel cells, bug repellent, first aid kits, freeze dried rations, water tight ditty bags, ammunition..etc. Because they are modular & stackable they are great for the grab and go lifestyle than an outdoorsman requires. 

 

You can also cut the bottom off one crate attach hinges & a latch and use it as a lid for a different crate. Since the crates are stackable it's a perfect way to custom fabricate a lid. I actually put a small cushion on one of the lids I made and it's an extra chair when in the field. 

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I have been using a light mist from a garden hose for years on my rod and reel. Not much else gets hosed down regularly. There has always been a lot of talk back and forth about a hose spray. I can tell you first hand even a light spray is not for every non sealed reel. Why I settled on the reels I use is because they can be hosed down in this fashion with no effect after each use.

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The spinning reels I have are not sealed so I don't spray them with water.

 

Just a light spray with oil and wipe them off.

 

*if they are covered with sand or got dunked. That's different.

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I use a Home Depot store brand pump sprayer, which has handily outlasted the name brand version I bought first, and has a better pressure relief valve. They are like $10, and will hold enough water for sevral trips. I'm all for rinsing salt residue and/or goo before it sets.

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5 hours ago, PeteA said:

I’m a new weekend warrior surfcaster. Usually early mornings. Just getting a feel for things. I usually wait till I get home and hose down and rinse all my gear off with our garden hose. I’m in a town house so the yard area is a bit tight but has a hose. I work on Sundays and have been toying with the idea of going out for a few hours before work to get a little more time on the water. That would mean all my gear is in the trunk all day without a rinse. I was thinking  of bringing along a 2 gallon, hand pump garden sprayer and rinsing my gear off in the parking lot or at work VS waiting till I get home. Was wondering what you guys use. Also you guys that camp out in 4x4s on the beach. What do you use to rinse off your gear. Thoughts, insights all welcome. 
Thx boys. 

I've been using a garden hose for decades....quick rinse and done.  I think the sprayer would work well, but it's fine to wait till you get home.  Entry level gear may be more vulnerable but still not the end of the world.  I had an $18 Zebco rod that lasted 20 yrs without being rinsed.  If applicable, I'd be more concerned with the rod being exposed to excessive heat in your trunk.  Of course you don't want to bend the rod while in your trunk.    

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https://www.amazon.com/Bang4buck-Portable-Electric-Pressure-Powerful/dp/B071YNCXQ6/ref=mp_s_a_1_15?dchild=1&keywords=12+volt+pump+sprayer+hose&qid=1620243527&sr=8-15

I used to usea garden sprayer but upgraded to this and 5 gallon water tank because I got a kid that I need to wash the sand off of at the beach.  Cheaper in Amazon warehouse.a

 

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Salt Away in a hand held spray bottle. Neutralizes salt in 15 seconds. Spray, shake off excess and forget about it. It’s non toxic. Use to wash tuna gear with simple green and water with a sponge. What a waste of time. 

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I rent an apartment at the shore for 3 months in the fall. My rods and reels are locked on the truck. They get rinsed when it rains or when the windshield is really a mess.  Everything gets a complete tare down after the season. Some of my reels are 15 or 20 years old and going strong. I don’t understand the phobia about splashing with salt water. I knew a girl in high school who’s father told everyone that she hadn’t had sex that she was pregnant because she got splashed, but not with salt water.

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