doublegregg

old eyes fishing fresh - contacts or glasses, and sun glasses?

11 posts in this topic

previously i posted asking about polarized prescription sun glasses...........

 

for fresh water fishing, it seems important to be able to see what is going on underwater - if the water is clear enough.

 

i was going to get my first pair of prescription sunglasses, polarized, to be able to see what is under the water - i guess mainly trout streams. now i'm wondering - what about contact lenses, and then i can just buy whatever off the shelf sun glasses i want.  BUT --- to see ANYTHING close to me, such as tying any knot whatsoever --- i'd need close up glasses. so this would involve contacts, non-prescription sun glasses, and close up (aka reading) glasses to use with my contacts.

 

i'm very near sighted, my script is -7.25, and i haven't worn contacts in years. i have preferred to wear glasses.

 

i'm interested in trout, panfish, maybe shad. i'm guessing  that of those, trout would be the ones that i'd be doing this for.... i'm wondering what other guys have done as their eyes got, well, old...  especially the contact and reading glass combo  for people who are extremely near sighted...

 

thanks for any suggestions.... !

Edited by doublegregg

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I an gonna try carring a cheap pair of readers for knot tying 

 

I do have glasses but only wear them for driving occasionally.  This year I am having issues when tying with very fine lines and leaders getting older sucks

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When I wore glasses I preferred prescription sunglasses.

Interestingly as I got older my eyes changed and I no longer need glasses for distance.

But I need reading glasses.

A better than fair tradeoff in my opinion.

 

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I have used bifocal glasses for 20 years and find I need new RX adjusted every 3years. I assume you have an annual eye exam to check for  cataracts . Very Important ,your doc can tell you what you really need.

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I had to bite the bullet 15 year ago and go to sunglasses with graduated bifocals for close and far.  Makes your depth perception a little off until you brain makes the adjustment to the bifocals.

 

Erhlichiosis ruined my eyes after I got a bad tick bite. The joint damage got better, but my eyes never did.

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I've had polarized prescription sunglasses for years and love 'em.  They're not bifocals so I don't know how they'll work for you with knot tying.  If that does work, then I think  polarized prescription sunglasses is the way to go.  Good luck.

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Always used good quality polaroid glasses wrap around style. Now have had 2 pairs of prescription glasses, Maui Jims were very expensive at close to $800 but warranty is great. Have a second pair made up by local shop for $400 with wraparound and polarization that is excellent.   A tip. I learned 40 yrs ago was to always to beneath the water surface, look at the bottom. Just changing your approach as to what you are targeting from streams to 20' of water makes a huge difference. "Look into water not at." 

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If you haven't tried contacts in years and you don't have much of an astigmatism, you may want to try contacts again.  I've worn them for ~ 35 years.....never thought about that number until now.  They are thinner, more oxygen permeable, and easier to clean and more comfortable than ever.  Cheaper  and safer too.   I've got prescription progressives I wear at night and when allergy season kicks up.  Otherwise it's just readers for me.  Knot tying requires me to drop the  non prescription shades and pull out the readers.  I think a contact lens exam costs may $100 bucks or less on top of a regular eye exam and they should you some sample lenses to buy.  Lots of options from daily wear to those you pitch after a couple of weeks

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53 mins ago, rathrbefishn said:

If you haven't tried contacts in years and you don't have much of an astigmatism, you may want to try contacts again.  I've worn them for ~ 35 years.....never thought about that number until now.  They are thinner, more oxygen permeable, and easier to clean and more comfortable than ever.  Cheaper  and safer too.   I've got prescription progressives I wear at night and when allergy season kicks up.  Otherwise it's just readers for me.  Knot tying requires me to drop the  non prescription shades and pull out the readers.  I think a contact lens exam costs may $100 bucks or less on top of a regular eye exam and they should you some sample lenses to buy.  Lots of options from daily wear to those you pitch after a couple of weeks

ty... i haven't worn contacts for about 25 years... just gotta try to figure out if i'd like to switch back to them .... possible .... or stick with glasses, which i kind of prefer. also, i currently use computer glasses, and distance ones. i just read by holding a book quite close... so - have to think about how contacts would change that calculus.....!

it'll be nice to be able to see more of what goes on underwater, tho, when fishing streams. man, right now --- i mean, it would have to be moby dick for me to see him.... actually, not that bad, but i definitely want to try polarizing lenses for fresh water.

 

Edited by doublegregg

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I use prescription sunglasses with a cord that lets them hang around my neck.

 

Most of the time, I keep them on.  When I need to tie a knot, I let the sunglasses tangle, hold the fly/lure/swivel close to my face and tie the knot, then put the sunglasses back on.

 

Don't want bifocals, because I find that people who wear them tend to hold their head differently depending on whether they're trying to see near or far, and I don't want to develop a habit like that which might throw off my shotgun mount (a friend wiho went with bifocals is definitely not shooting as well as he once did, and holding his head differently at the mount seems to be the difference).

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I don't wear prescription so can't comment on that, but I use these clip on magnifiers on my polarized shades when I'm fishing with light lines. As I've gotten older, it pretty much sucks but they've become a "must have" item.  Without them it's a battle to to tie superfine braid and light flouro leaders, especially to those tiny swivels !

 

Just got back from a 3 day shad fishing camping trip - these magnifiers were a trip saver

 

60915bb8e0d60_Cliponmagnifiers.PNG.d540fea1e6334fc59718e1695b95b248.PNG

 

 

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