65 Sea James

Cleaning rust of of Clam Rakes

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Hi All,

 

I currently have these Virginia style clam rakes that are pretty old with a lot of rust on them. 
In order to extend their life, I am planning on removing all of the rust and then paint them with the black protective enamel paint from rustoleam. 
I was planning on sandblasting the rust off, but am concerned that the blasting will completely blow right through the metal since the metal is pretty thin.

 

Any comments on what is the best method of removing rust for clam rakes?

 

Image below shows a bunch of the rusty clam rakes.

0523455E-B5A9-40A8-9301-639BC24BE5A5.jpeg

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I’ll probably only do a full paint at the end of every season so that the winter doesn’t have any effect.

 

But after every use, I am planning on servicing them by rinsing off the saltwater, and then wiping the rake down with WD-40.

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11 mins ago, 65 Sea James said:

I’ll probably only do a full paint at the end of every season so that the winter doesn’t have any effect.

 

But after every use, I am planning on servicing them by rinsing off the saltwater, and then wiping the rake down with WD-40.

IMO, way too much effort and love.  Those rake heads will outlive you without any additional care.  Now older ones with non-stainless baskets will deteriorate over 20 - 30 years, but even if they're not stainless, the tines and frame will last more than one lifetime.

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48 mins ago, Roccus7 said:

I have to ask "WHY?"  You're only going to rub the paint off with any sort of regular use.  

Exactly. Whatever you do will just result in the same condition. Hose them down after use and replace as necessary. Buy Stainless next time.

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19 mins ago, DrBob said:

Just use them and when they break get new ones.  They'll prob outlive you.

 

It's obvious that one of them is on a 2nd or 3rd handle.  

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1 hour ago, 65 Sea James said:

Hi All,

 

I currently have these Virginia style clam rakes that are pretty old with a lot of rust on them. 
In order to extend their life, I am planning on removing all of the rust and then paint them with the black protective enamel paint from rustoleam. 
I was planning on sandblasting the rust off, but am concerned that the blasting will completely blow right through the metal since the metal is pretty thin.

 

Any comments on what is the best method of removing rust for clam rakes?

 

Image below shows a bunch of the rusty clam rakes.

0523455E-B5A9-40A8-9301-639BC24BE5A5.jpeg

You can try glass beading them instead of sandblasting or if you just sandblasting just don't get close stay far away from it and it will come clean.

 

HH

 

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11 mins ago, Heavy Hooksetter said:

You can try glass beading them instead of sandblasting or if you just sandblasting just don't get close stay far away from it and it will come clean.

 

HH

 

+1 for the sandblasting. But personally, I would just let it be.

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Having rakes I bought new in the 70's both brazed and welded they are still functioning. I gave them no care. A lot has to do with the original quality of the steel. Ron Ribb rakes built by himself in the 80's into early 90's before he killed himself are still in perfect shape. The wife hired half a$$Ed welders who lacked his metal skills and cheaped out on components the side rails rusted out in a season. I have eel spears, dredges, and old school clam rakes pushing a 100 years old. One outing dragging thru bottom cleans the rake up, what happens next involves the quality of the metal.

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