hotfishgirl

How is your garden coming

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On 4/28/2021 at 2:40 PM, WorcBoy said:

Yes

those actually look the best. Beans squash and cukes look rough. 

I'll take a pic tonight

 

 

Sometimes transitioning to fabric pots you will tend to under water, with so much more air in the root zone it dries out quicker. This early with small plants that may not be the issue though. I've been using ones called grassroots living soil pots that have a liner in the top third of the pot to hold water, but the bottom third still breathes and prunes the roots creating those nice fibrous roots Bob is talking about. Kind of the best of both worlds, before they came out some people were wrapping the top third of their fabric pots in saran wrap to retain more moisture.

 

When does everyone put peppers and tomotoes and zuchini outside? I think I started everything too early and now have a bunch of peppers and tomatoes outgrowing their solo cup containers, may need to transplant before they go outside. Also has anyone ever done zuchini in a pot? I know they get massive but I'm going to try it this year, I have a couple extra 15 gallons laying around.

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1 hour ago, oldgoat said:

I'm afraid I shouldn't take a spot an then back out.

My tongue works but every thing else is slowing down a lot.

I hope you guys have a fun trip and post it.

It's been an honor to have traveled with you guys before and looking forward to pictures.

WE are going to miss the jokes my friend . Hopefully life continues with a smile. Peace and Prayers

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3 hours ago, nateD said:

Sometimes transitioning to fabric pots you will tend to under water, with so much more air in the root zone it dries out quicker. This early with small plants that may not be the issue though. I've been using ones called grassroots living soil pots that have a liner in the top third of the pot to hold water, but the bottom third still breathes and prunes the roots creating those nice fibrous roots Bob is talking about. Kind of the best of both worlds, before they came out some people were wrapping the top third of their fabric pots in saran wrap to retain more moisture.

 

When does everyone put peppers and tomotoes and zuchini outside? I think I started everything too early and now have a bunch of peppers and tomatoes outgrowing their solo cup containers, may need to transplant before they go outside. Also has anyone ever done zuchini in a pot? I know they get massive but I'm going to try it this year, I have a couple extra 15 gallons laying around.

The biggest problems I used to have with reg peat pots for seedlings was the peat dried out very fast, wicking moisture from the soil out into to air.. and then once dry, the peat formed a hard barrier difficult for the new roots to penetrate. So when transplanting I was forced to peel away the moist peat pots into shreds, to allow the roots an easier transition to garden soil without running into a dry peat wall.

 

Now I use 'earth friendly' Styrofoam 16oz cups... No, they're not exactly earth friendly. But can be used over again. I find 16oz is a nice size for seedlings that grow up fast, and tend to root bind inside smaller cups or cells. My cantaloupe, watermelon, cukes, and winter squash get the 16oz cups. Whatever it is, I've had my best luck with plants when they don't stall out or get shocked, or get too mature in their early development. Had Tomatoes before that went in big and flowering and they got passed by smaller starts that went in as rapidly growing but somewhat smaller seedlings. Too small at transplant not great either. I like goldilocks seedlings, mid sized and growing fast

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16 hours ago, rst3 said:

The biggest problems I used to have with reg peat pots for seedlings was the peat dried out very fast, wicking moisture from the soil out into to air.. and then once dry, the peat formed a hard barrier difficult for the new roots to penetrate. So when transplanting I was forced to peel away the moist peat pots into shreds, to allow the roots an easier transition to garden soil without running into a dry peat wall.

 

Now I use 'earth friendly' Styrofoam 16oz cups... No, they're not exactly earth friendly. But can be used over again. I find 16oz is a nice size for seedlings that grow up fast, and tend to root bind inside smaller cups or cells. My cantaloupe, watermelon, cukes, and winter squash get the 16oz cups. Whatever it is, I've had my best luck with plants when they don't stall out or get shocked, or get too mature in their early development. Had Tomatoes before that went in big and flowering and they got passed by smaller starts that went in as rapidly growing but somewhat smaller seedlings. Too small at transplant not great either. I like goldilocks seedlings, mid sized and growing fast

small breathable pots are the most difficult for sure, hydophobic peat sucks, I've soaked whole pots before trying to re-hydrate.

 

My tomatoes are 5-6 inches tall right now, and peppers about the same maybe at the 5th or so node. Need that damn warm weather to come around, but I might transplant in to 1 gallons to avoid any getting bound up.

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On 5/6/2021 at 2:38 PM, nateD said:

Sometimes transitioning to fabric pots you will tend to under water, with so much more air in the root zone it dries out quicker. This early with small plants that may not be the issue though. I've been using ones called grassroots living soil pots that have a liner in the top third of the pot to hold water, but the bottom third still breathes and prunes the roots creating those nice fibrous roots Bob is talking about. Kind of the best of both worlds, before they came out some people were wrapping the top third of their fabric pots in saran wrap to retain more moisture.

 

When does everyone put peppers and tomotoes and zuchini outside? I think I started everything too early and now have a bunch of peppers and tomatoes outgrowing their solo cup containers, may need to transplant before they go outside. Also has anyone ever done zuchini in a pot? I know they get massive but I'm going to try it this year, I have a couple extra 15 gallons laying around.

You’re fine with putting the peppers outside now. The tomatoes and zucchini are probably fine too. If you get a cold night you can cover them with a bucket or something. 
 

What type of soil are you guys using with the fabric pots?

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49 mins ago, z-man said:

You’re fine with putting the peppers outside now. The tomatoes and zucchini are probably fine too. If you get a cold night you can cover them with a bucket or something. 
 

What type of soil are you guys using with the fabric pots?

I’m planning on next Wednesday, after the next few cold nights it looks to be warming up towards the 50s

 

I mix my own sometimes (1/3 compost, 1/3 peat, 1/3 perlite + minerals and nutrients) But lately everyone near me is carrying the coast of maine products which I really like, raised bed mix or platinum are what I usually get. A top dressing mid season, maybe some fish hydrolysate and they pretty much just need water.

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I'm usually not *too* concerned with a few chilly overnights during the seedling stage for most heat loving plants. It's the soil temps I worry most about when starting early. Cold, wet, and anaerobic soil is a nasty combo for vulnerable starts. If it downpours and floods out your beds, when the soil's still cold??.. yikes. At best the starts will stall or do little til the soil warms and dries. At worst, rot and fungus explodes in the root zone and the roots turn brown and start to stink. Basically a huge uphill battle to recover after that point

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12 hours ago, nateD said:

My tomatoes are 5-6 inches tall right now, and peppers about the same maybe at the 5th or so node. Need that damn warm weather to come around, but I might transplant in to 1 gallons to avoid any getting bound up.

One thing I've found is that peppers seem to do very well when planting oversize, bigger seedlings/sm plants that have larger root systems vs rinky dink, scrony pepper seedlings with small root balls. At least the ones I've grown.. bigger plants root in quicker and get going fast, while smaller plants sometimes can take awhile to stick and grow. 

 

I haven't used 1G containers, maybe 6" pots. Something like that. Never had peppers large enough to fill out a 1G with roots before transplanting time arrived. 

 

Tomatoes: if they're big and have already started flowering, I pinch the flowers off to prevent early fruit set. When I didn't do that: I had transplants that spent all their limited energy developing a tomato or two the 1st month or so and lagged well behind the starts that went in small and didn't set fruit. Only upside is, if you have lots of space and plants .. these 1 or 2 tomato transplants ripen their first fruit super early. So you have a few to eat before any others ripen. These plants do eventually grow out and set a wave of later tomatoes, but they never reach their full potential size and yield. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

First time doing a garden in a long time. Started seeds in March, had a few hiccups, but at this point, I think we’re in good shape for the space we have going this year. 
 

That said, some tomatoes are starting to yellow. I’m thinking they are running out of nutrients and/or room in the pots, girlfriend almost always assumes the worst and thinks they could have some sort of disease/fungus. 
 

The tomatoes are all receiving equal treatment. They were started in peat pellets, then transplanted to the peat pots with a 5/5/1 mixture of peat, compost and perlite respectively. They’re under fluorescent lights on a 16/8 timer. Really haven’t had any issues until now. 
 

Thoughts?

C60833D3-D913-4ED1-99CB-003195E783B1.jpeg

Edited by JTR

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Here’s a look at the pallet planters I built this year. Due to heavy shade all around the house, the driveway was the only place to put the garden. Plan originally was to make them out of cedar, however with the price of lumber this year, I said no way and made them out of pallets (I know my pallets and did it right, plus lined them appropriately). No plans for the planters, literally just started taking pallets apart, measuring, sawing, and nailing, then just copied the first design. They measure about 48”x 26” of planting space, by about 15” deep. If I get 2 years out of them, I’ll be happy, plus I should have a house with plenty of gardening room by that time. 
 

We’ve got beets, carrots and peas going outside now in the first 3 planters. Just planted some basil from seed along with the peas as an experiment. The other three will be cucumbers, tomatoes and peppers. The cattle panel arches are going to be secured to the planters today. Also going to put together a trellis for the peas today. If time allows next weekend, I may try to put together 1-2 more planters.
 

 

056EA15A-067D-441F-A236-862A68A1C6B9.jpeg

6437E4C7-C0F3-46FB-A81F-8FA2FF05C693.jpeg

Edited by JTR

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3 hours ago, JTR said:

Here’s a look at the pallet planters I built this year. Due to heavy shade all around the house, the driveway was the only place to put the garden. Plan originally was to make them out of cedar, however with the price of lumber this year, I said no way and made them out of pallets (I know my pallets and did it right, plus lined them appropriately). No plans for the planters, literally just started taking pallets apart, measuring, sawing, and nailing, then just copied the first design. They measure about 48”x 26” of planting space, by about 15” deep. If I get 2 years out of them, I’ll be happy, plus I should have a house with plenty of gardening room by that time. 
 

We’ve got beets, carrots and peas going outside now in the first 3 planters. Just planted some basil from seed along with the peas as an experiment. The other three will be cucumbers, tomatoes and peppers. The cattle panel arches are going to be secured to the planters today. Also going to put together a trellis for the peas today. If time allows next weekend, I may try to put together 1-2 more planters.
 

 

056EA15A-067D-441F-A236-862A68A1C6B9.jpeg

6437E4C7-C0F3-46FB-A81F-8FA2FF05C693.jpeg

Those planters look great. I made one of a similar design out of cedar last year. I was going to make another this year but not with the current price of lumber. 

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4 hours ago, JTR said:

Here’s a look at the pallet planters I built this year. Due to heavy shade all around the house, the driveway was the only place to put the garden. Plan originally was to make them out of cedar, however with the price of lumber this year, I said no way and made them out of pallets (I know my pallets and did it right, plus lined them appropriately). No plans for the planters, literally just started taking pallets apart, measuring, sawing, and nailing, then just copied the first design. They measure about 48”x 26” of planting space, by about 15” deep. If I get 2 years out of them, I’ll be happy, plus I should have a house with plenty of gardening room by that time. 
 

We’ve got beets, carrots and peas going outside now in the first 3 planters. Just planted some basil from seed along with the peas as an experiment. The other three will be cucumbers, tomatoes and peppers. The cattle panel arches are going to be secured to the planters today. Also going to put together a trellis for the peas today. If time allows next weekend, I may try to put together 1-2 more planters.
 

 

056EA15A-067D-441F-A236-862A68A1C6B9.jpeg

6437E4C7-C0F3-46FB-A81F-8FA2FF05C693.jpeg

Really  nice work.  I wish I was that talented.   

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7 hours ago, JTR said:

That said, some tomatoes are starting to yellow. I’m thinking they are running out of nutrients and/or room in the pots, girlfriend almost always assumes the worst and thinks they could have some sort of disease/fungus. 
 

The tomatoes are all receiving equal treatment. They were started in peat pellets, then transplanted to the peat pots with a 5/5/1 mixture of peat, compost and perlite respectively. They’re under fluorescent lights on a 16/8 timer. Really haven’t had any issues until now. 
 

Thoughts?

C60833D3-D913-4ED1-99CB-003195E783B1.jpeg

I'm no tomato doctor, but I'd vote for nutrient deficiency. Probably several, so the mix of symptoms on the leaves may not be easily diagnosed by trying to compare to pictures of tomatoes with specific deficiencies.

 

Might want to try a water soluble chem fertilizer which is able to be absorbed right away. Probably won't reverse the damage that's already showing, but should help the plants return to healthy growth. 

 

I've had issues in the past with plants running out of nutrients in small containers without supplemental fertilization. So my guess is that it's time to give your tomatoes some food. 

 

Also, your planters really look great. I'm thinking the soil in them will have warmed much more than a bed on the ground, so after the stretch of chilly nights this week, maybe consider poppin your starts in 

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Soil temps still very chilly across SNE. Low 50s. 

Screenshot_20210509-134757_Chrome.jpg.8699d5715e17cad5b80e8f0bd5f0b4f0.jpg

 

Supposedly the weather pattern may shift to a little warmer stuff in a week or so. Which should help.  

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