hotfishgirl

How is your garden coming

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24 mins ago, K Foley said:

I do when i can't reach anymore. Are yours setting a lot of fruit? Mine have not just picked a few so far. Last year  HFG grew her's way tall but they still looked good. Mine not so much this year. No problem with yours bending over?

Mine are loaded with big clusters of green cherry tomatoes. A couple are over 7' and are beginning to bend over.

We had one by the back door last year that was up against the corner of the house. It grew well over 8' and we got tomatoes from it until the frost.

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Welp, there's only so much plants can take before they enter serious decline. This past week pushed mine over the edge. Combination of cool temperatures, continuous foggy drizzly days and endless heavy rain finally sent my winter squash to the showers.

 

They're not dead by any means, just into critical decline. Soil conditions are the worst I've ever seen. Everywhere is mud, but in the field near my squash rows, the mud is beyond extreme. It's become anaerobic greasy sludge..that actually smells like ****.

 

Nothing can grow in the worst areas of the field: these areas are weed and plant free because nothing besides cat-o-9-tails roots rot in the deep stinking mud. 

 

Lowest row of cantaloupe is borderline permanent fade/collapse, and I'm doubtful any of the fruit set there will be able to ripen properly at all. Might end up with a giant pile of tasteless, poorly finished cantaloupe. Can't expect fading vines to pump sugars and nutrients into developing or ripening melons. 

 

Tomatoes I picked so far are water filled and lousy. Cucumbers are actually in a good spot in the field for drainage and doing fair, but bacterial wilt has set in this week from the onslaught of Cucumber beetles a few weeks back. 20% loss so far from wilt.

 

Definitely bummed because of all the work put in, but the bottom line is my gardening is just a hobby. I don't lose money I needed to earn, or food I needed to eat. So at least there's that. 

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Have blossom end rot on my tomatoes in 2 different gardens. Treating with limestone. Hopefully it helps. 

First time I've had this in years and likely due to crazy weather, at least in part. Anyone know if winter squash is susceptible to this as well? 

 

Corn is maturing but I had to do 5 plantings with 3 different brands or types of corn so God knows what I'll see. Hopefully it will come in waves. 

 

Sunflowers and my wife's zinnias and cosmos are doing great though. 

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Where are all my squash?

Plants and vines growing beautifully. Only thing is 99.9% of my flowers are males?

I can see a few tiny squash here and there, but they don't appear to be growing at all.

Thoughts?

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Just now, bob_G said:

Where are all my squash?

Plants and vines growing beautifully. Only thing is 99.9% of my flowers are males?

I can see a few tiny squash here and there, but they don't appear to be growing at all.

Thoughts?

Same here with pumpkins and zukes showing the same issues....   tomatoes are hurting as well.

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For now I think I may have saved my tomatoes. Pruned a ton of lower branches that were either blighted, diseased, or somehow impacted by the rain.  Then hit them with more copper fungicide, and sprayed more baking soda/vegetable oil/fish soap mixture. 

Had one casualty, that I had to pull up. First time ever.  A couple others in the raised bed are hanging on, but should produce fruit.

 

The ones in the 10 gallon pots seemed to have recovered. But I doubt I'll have the fruit I'm used to. About half the slicing tomatoes had odd shaped fruits, with ridges. The rest have uniform fruits, but smaller than other years.

However all my cherries are thriving. Tons of fruit, no blight, and 7' tall.

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25 mins ago, bob_G said:

Where are all my squash?

Plants and vines growing beautifully. Only thing is 99.9% of my flowers are males?

I can see a few tiny squash here and there, but they don't appear to be growing at all.

Thoughts?

Same here. I had lots of flowers but they fell off and no squash growing. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

We definitely had some seed confusion for tomatoes as we grew them. We’ve got big tomatoes growing where the cherries were supposed to be, then cherries where the Rutgers were supposed to be, etc. That said, they haven’t done too poorly. They’re all 5-6’ tall and putting out decent fruit production. Not a whole lot of blossom end rot or disease, but we have stayed on top of pruning during this heavy rain period.

 

I believe the key to our success has been mixing our own potting soil. 5 parts peat, 5 parts compost and 2 parts perlite. It has drained very well during the last month. We’re growing in 4’x8’x16” pallet wood beds.

 

Funny to think that all of this started when my girlfriend brought home a pack of cherry tomato seeds from Christmas Tree Shoppes in February.

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Edited by JTR

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7 hours ago, bob_G said:

Where are all my squash?

Plants and vines growing beautifully. Only thing is 99.9% of my flowers are males?

I can see a few tiny squash here and there, but they don't appear to be growing at all.

Thoughts?

 

7 hours ago, sagamoron said:

Same here with pumpkins and zukes showing the same issues....   

 

7 hours ago, z-man said:

Same here. I had lots of flowers but they fell off and no squash growing. 

Couple ideas. 

The usual explanation given for poor female flower production is waay overdoing nitrogen fertilizer, or during periods of extreme heat. I seriously doubt everyone zapped their plants with lawn fertilizer, and forget the extreme heat angle. So toss the two common reasons out. 

 

A more reasonable explanation has to do with the weather we've had this July. Cool cloudy wet conditions aren't overly conducive to bees feeding, so there's that part. But the main reason might be heavy moisture and wetness inside the female flowers themselves. Water can interfere with the pollen grains, as well as formation of the pollen tube during fertilization. It also helps bacteria and fungus proliferate on the newly formed fruit, damaging or killing it. The plant ends up aborting the damaged squash, which fades in color, softens, then drops off. 

 

That's about all I could come up with, but I think the weeks of wet and humid weather seems like the best explanation for poor yields in squash. 

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Some updated July rainfall totals from around the state. Pretty moist. 

20210722_164548.jpg.a501a1b9b641377b62b03153ac75447f.jpg

Not sure what fool pissed off the rain gods, but thanks for the big screw you jerk

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3 hours ago, rst3 said:

 

 

Couple ideas. 

The usual explanation given for poor female flower production is waay overdoing nitrogen fertilizer, or during periods of extreme heat. I seriously doubt everyone zapped their plants with lawn fertilizer, and forget the extreme heat angle. So toss the two common reasons out. 

 

A more reasonable explanation has to do with the weather we've had this July. Cool cloudy wet conditions aren't overly conducive to bees feeding, so there's that part. But the main reason might be heavy moisture and wetness inside the female flowers themselves. Water can interfere with the pollen grains, as well as formation of the pollen tube during fertilization. It also helps bacteria and fungus proliferate on the newly formed fruit, damaging or killing it. The plant ends up aborting the damaged squash, which fades in color, softens, then drops off. 

 

That's about all I could come up with, but I think the weeks of wet and humid weather seems like the best explanation for poor yields in squash. 

I took a closer look at my squash plants this afternoon. I actually found a full size squash hidden under some leaves. Other than that there’s just a couple tiny squash just starting. That brings my total harvest this year to 1 squash, 2 tomatoes and some mixed lettuce. Pretty pathetic for late July. 

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One positive is that it actually hasn’t rained at my house today…yet. This is only the second day this month that it hasn’t rained. 

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I made a cover out of 2 or 3 mil clear plastic and stapled 1/2x1x6' wood to opposite sides. Hung this over the potted tomatoes as protection from the heavy downpours and hail forecast earlier this summer. Wife has covered them from the slightest chance of heavy rain, almost to the extreme. They get watered well by hand, but now wondering if I should be doing a second round of trimming suckers? They are so healthy looking and full of fruit that I might just leave alone. Thoughts?

 

Is canning tomatoes really a PITA? Mentioned it here and got that look.......

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