hotfishgirl

How is your garden coming

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Anyone ever see a bell pepper start out like this? The package the seeds came in says sweet pepper with a picture of a bell. Third pic is a jalapeño those are looking like what I expect.
 

Last is the whole mini front yard garden. My tomatoes also don’t really want to grow, seemed like the first really early heatwave messed with them but still growing there’s a few fruits on them.

 

 Zucchini also is struggling, got 1 nice one off it and have another getting big, but most are turning yellow and dying off. Hand pollinating seems to have helped but I have tons of bees so idk, probably not enough root space in a plastic pot and inconsistent water. Cucumbers are great, picked maybe 30 or so. 

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After today's tropical system, some towns will have recorded 10" of water in the last 10days, with rains falling nearly every day in some cases. That's two and a half months worth of rain in less than two weeks. Not good. 

 

Given the almost biblical rains that have fallen since June 30th(cape gen excluded), fungus should be a major problem this season.

 

Lots of options for chemical control, but what to do if you're not big on chemical fungicides? Besides the standard copper sprays, I just learned there's another option for organic garderners: Serenade or Cease.

PE-SerenadeQT-2T.jpg.903886b57e43d30752e0d7a703b260ec.jpgScreenshot_20210709-051757_Chrome.jpg.eebbd98b9cea823f1f4dbaeffbbb7fc8.jpg

 

Serenade description:

clear1x1.gif
A broad spectrum biofungicide, Serenade Garden contains a patented strain of Bacillus subtilis. Provides protection against many of the most common fungal and bacterial garden diseases (see label). Now you can grow beautiful disease-free fruits, vegetables and flowers – without chemicals that can be harmful to people or the environment. It is so safe you can confidently harvest and eat fruits and vegetables the very same day they are treated. Will NOT harm bees or beneficial insects.

OMRI Listed for use in organic production
 
If you haven't started spraying yet, good idea to get on that quickly. Treatment is about preventing the fungus, not curing the damage once it sets in. Afaik, only a handful of the most powerful fungicides can be used to marginally help a badly hit plant. Essentially, once leaves or produce get hit there's nothing that can be done to fix the damage 

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3 hours ago, rst3 said:

After today's tropical system, some towns will have recorded 10" of water in the last 10days, with rains falling nearly every day in some cases. That's two and a half months worth of rain in less than two weeks. Not good. 

 

Given the almost biblical rains that have fallen since June 30th(cape gen excluded), fungus should be a major problem this season.

 

Lots of options for chemical control, but what to do if you're not big on chemical fungicides? Besides the standard copper sprays, I just learned there's another option for organic garderners: Serenade or Cease.

PE-SerenadeQT-2T.jpg.903886b57e43d30752e0d7a703b260ec.jpgScreenshot_20210709-051757_Chrome.jpg.eebbd98b9cea823f1f4dbaeffbbb7fc8.jpg

 

Serenade description:

clear1x1.gif
A broad spectrum biofungicide, Serenade Garden contains a patented strain of Bacillus subtilis. Provides protection against many of the most common fungal and bacterial garden diseases (see label). Now you can grow beautiful disease-free fruits, vegetables and flowers – without chemicals that can be harmful to people or the environment. It is so safe you can confidently harvest and eat fruits and vegetables the very same day they are treated. Will NOT harm bees or beneficial insects.

OMRI Listed for use in organic production
 
If you haven't started spraying yet, good idea to get on that quickly. Treatment is about preventing the fungus, not curing the damage once it sets in. Afaik, only a handful of the most powerful fungicides can be used to marginally help a badly hit plant. Essentially, once leaves or produce get hit there's nothing that can be done to fix the damage 

Along with this record rain we had a heat wave followed by record lows. The plants don’t know what the hell is going on! My garden is definitely growing the worst it has in years. 

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11 hours ago, nateD said:

Anyone ever see a bell pepper start out like this? The package the seeds came in says sweet pepper with a picture of a bell. Third pic is a jalapeño those are looking like what I expect.

The "mystery" peppers look like they may have a crease in them. Jalapenos are perfectly smooth/round. Those may be Anaheim which are lobed. I let Anaheims get red then smoke and dehydate and grind them. The result is a really good chili powder.

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12 mins ago, speedwell said:

The "mystery" peppers look like they may have a crease in them. Jalapenos are perfectly smooth/round. Those may be Anaheim which are lobed. I let Anaheims get red then smoke and dehydate and grind them. The result is a really good chili powder.

Ya they are for sure not jalapeños, I was planning on leaving them til they change color, hoping they plump up some

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I would definitely be worried about that, looks like a disease of some sort or a pest issue.

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Wouldn't Nitrogen deficiency start at the bottom of the plant because it is mobile? If it is a nutrient deficiency maybe iron?

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3 hours ago, nateD said:

I would definitely be worried about that, looks like a disease of some sort or a pest issue.

 

3 hours ago, nateD said:

Wouldn't Nitrogen deficiency start at the bottom of the plant because it is mobile? If it is a nutrient deficiency maybe iron?

 

Yeah that's not good.

Unaffected leaves are healthy green with a sharp gradient and as Nate said, N is mobile. The entire plant would be exhibiting symptoms, plus the lowest leaves die off first as N shifts to the typically greener growing tips.

 

No idea what that is but "oh crap. bad disease" is the first thing that comes to mind. 

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The weather has certainly had a negative impact on my zucchini. Picked 9-10 of them but a bunch are now starting to rot on the ends once they start growing.  Due to all the rain or not enough airflow? 

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3 hours ago, nateD said:

 If it is a nutrient deficiency maybe iron?

I think you're right. 

 

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"The most common symptom for iron deficiency starts out as an interveinal chlorosis of the youngest leaves, evolves into an overall chlorosis, and ends as a totally bleached leaf. Because iron has a low mobility, iron deficiency symptoms appear first on the youngest leaves. Iron deficiency is strongly associated with calcareous soils, anaerobic conditions, and it is often induced by an excess of heavy metals"

 

Best guess for me is that the recent heavy rains created anaerobic muck in your soil bed, which locked up iron. 

 

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