KarpsnKatz

Breakaway sinkers

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Last summer I started fishing the Delaware River for flatheads. I quickly realized the river is super snaggy and eats terminal tackle like a monster. Due to its rocky nature, I believe its mainly the sinker getting wedged between rocks. I don't know if the tying the sinker to my rig with a lighter mono would apply here, since the heavy current requires heavier weights. Any other tips or ideas? thanks.

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There are some options for sinkers that will snag less.  Bottom bouncers, I've used a few times and  I think Lindy makes some that are snag resistant/proof . It's been a long time since I looked at this, but i think you can fill up short sections of tubing with heavy shot to make less snag prone sinkers.  I don't have much first hand experience and the best one will depend on the kind of fishing you are doing.  The specialty ones cost more, but in addition to no wanting to avoidably lose a bunch of rigs, getting snagged just eats up precious fishing time.  

PS-  even just switching shape of standard sinkers will help-  bank vs bell vs egg vs pencil vs....

Edited by rathrbefishn

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53 mins ago, connman said:

UK anglers fish a rig called ‘rotten bottom’ for snaggy situations . Sounds like what you need. 

Thanks, I'll google that up

 

17 mins ago, rathrbefishn said:

There are some options for sinkers that will snag less.  Bottom bouncers, I've used a few times and  I think Lindy makes some that are snag resistant/proof . It's been a long time since I looked at this, but i think you can fill up short sections of tubing with heavy shot to make less snag prone sinkers.  I don't have much first hand experience and the best one will depend on the kind of fishing you are doing.  The specialty ones cost more, but in addition to no wanting to avoidably lose a bunch of rigs, getting snagged just eats up precious fishing time.  

PS-  even just switching shape of standard sinkers will help-  bank vs bell vs egg vs pencil vs....

Actually, the first sinkers I tried were those teardrop shaped no roll sinkers. They didn't work very well, as they still rolled. I switched to those concave coin style sinkers, and they seem to hold better in the current, but still tend to get hung up between rocks. I'll check out your suggestion. Thanks.

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When checking my bait, I like to pop the sinker off the bottom by lowering my rod, slow winding the slack out, then popping the weight off the bottom and winding fast.  This seems to help lessen snags.

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13 hours ago, KarpsnKatz said:

Last summer I started fishing the Delaware River for flatheads. I quickly realized the river is super snaggy and eats terminal tackle like a monster. Due to its rocky nature, I believe its mainly the sinker getting wedged between rocks. I don't know if the tying the sinker to my rig with a lighter mono would apply here, since the heavy current requires heavier weights. Any other tips or ideas? thanks.

 

What weight sinker are you using? 

 

What kind of main line and leader line are you using?

 

What kind of rig are you using?

Edited by Beastly Backlash

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12 hours ago, KarpsnKatz said:

Thanks, I'll google that up

 

Actually, the first sinkers I tried were those teardrop shaped no roll sinkers. They didn't work very well, as they still rolled. I switched to those concave coin style sinkers, and they seem to hold better in the current, but still tend to get hung up between rocks. I'll check out your suggestion. Thanks.

 

The flat no-roll sinkers tend to flutter like a spoon when cast into current causing a slow sink rate. This results in a lot of drift before they hit bottom resulting in your rig settling where you did not intend it too.

 

Coin or disk sinkers can have the same issue but too a lesser extent.

 

These two sinker styles simply add to the amount of drift caused by the larger bait you are already using. You want your lead to sink your rig and bait fast and anchor well in the river bottom. Your standard bank sinkers do this well.

 

You still have to use enough weight to get down. It is rate that I see anyone using enough weight for the conditions involved. For flatheads I never use less then 8oz. 16oz in the heaviest currents. You will still get snagged, but it will not be as often.

 

If you are casting into rip rap you should consider a float rig.

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5 hours ago, Beastly Backlash said:

 

What weight sinker are you using? 

 

What kind of main line and leader line are you using?

 

What kind of rig are you using?

 

5 hours ago, Beastly Backlash said:

 

The flat no-roll sinkers tend to flutter like a spoon when cast into current causing a slow sink rate. This results in a lot of drift before they hit bottom resulting in your rig settling where you did not intend it too.

 

Coin or disk sinkers can have the same issue but too a lesser extent.

 

These two sinker styles simply add to the amount of drift caused by the larger bait you are already using. You want your lead to sink your rig and bait fast and anchor well in the river bottom. Your standard bank sinkers do this well.

 

You still have to use enough weight to get down. It is rate that I see anyone using enough weight for the conditions involved. For flatheads I never use less then 8oz. 16oz in the heaviest currents. You will still get snagged, but it will not be as often.

 

If you are casting into rip rap you should consider a float rig.

Thanks for the reply. I'll answer the questions first, then get into more detail about conditions.

 

I'm using 2 to 3 oz. coin style sinkers. I know it sounds too light for a big river, but I always try to use the least amount of weight I can get away with.

 

My main line is 20lb And mono. Leader is a heavier piece of mono. I'm gonna guess around 40lb test(it came off a used reel I bought).

 

The rig I use is your basic fish finder rig any chunker would use off the surf.

 

where I'm trying to fish is an Eddie that swirls around an insanely deep pool. I usually try to hit the edge of the drop-off, where the water is a little calmer. I've pulled in some nice channels with this approach, so I figure a flattie can't be far behind. Should I be showing heavier weight into the deeper part of the pool?

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I would switch to braid for main line. 30lb

 

Less drag then mono and more snap to get you out of a snag.  You are pulling with a big rubber band.

 

Use a little more weight.  If your weight is sliding downstream it is only stopping when it finds a snag

 

If possible cast downstream and if snagged walk down and you can free many snags.  Lots of techniques to use,  I also let out lots of line and have the current pull it all down then reel very fast snags often slide right back out

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6 hours ago, KarpsnKatz said:

 

Thanks for the reply. I'll answer the questions first, then get into more detail about conditions.

 

I'm using 2 to 3 oz. coin style sinkers. I know it sounds too light for a big river, but I always try to use the least amount of weight I can get away with.

 

My main line is 20lb And mono. Leader is a heavier piece of mono. I'm gonna guess around 40lb test(it came off a used reel I bought).

 

The rig I use is your basic fish finder rig any chunker would use off the surf.

 

where I'm trying to fish is an Eddie that swirls around an insanely deep pool. I usually try to hit the edge of the drop-off, where the water is a little calmer. I've pulled in some nice channels with this approach, so I figure a flattie can't be far behind. Should I be showing heavier weight into the deeper part of the pool?

 

I will put it bluntly. Use heavier weight with different sinker styles. 

 

You getting snagged up excessively is not what I would call "getting away with".

 

I suggest having a dedicated channel cat set-up and a dedicated flathead set-up. What you are using sounds good for channels, but you may not get a big flathead to shore on 20lb mono.

 

If you want to target channels a light 20lb to 30lb braided mainline is the way to go. Ahab is right that braid will often allow you to pop free of a snag. Also, with a thinner line diameter you decrease water resistance on your line making it easier to hold bottom.

 

The issue with braid when fishing for cats is that you need to use a mono top shot or submerged structure will destroy your line.

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Thanks everyone for the suggestions. It's giving me a lot of food for thought. I'll start doing some research, and set up a more appropriate rig. First thing I'll start with is asking the age old question:

Any suggestions on a rod?

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2 hours ago, KarpsnKatz said:

Thanks everyone for the suggestions. It's giving me a lot of food for thought. I'll start doing some research, and set up a more appropriate rig. First thing I'll start with is asking the age old question:

Any suggestions on a rod?

 

What is your budget?:) 

 

The St. Croix 8ft XH Mojo Cat is probably the best big river trophy cat rod you can get hands down, but it will cost you. I own two and the cost was worth it. These rods can cast 32oz of weight (16oz of lead and a 12in bait is nothing), but have a tip soft enough to relay a bite from a 20in channel.

 

TWC makes a great shore rod in the 10ft Extender that will not break the bank. The rod can handle casting 8oz and a decent sized bait fish or chunk. TWC also makes the shorter, but powerful 7ft6in Extreme.

 

For distance go with a 12ft surf rod. The 12ft Heavy Penn Battalion II is a good option.

 

An XXH 9ft musky rod capable of casting at least 16oz of lead makes the best all around flathead rod. I actually run with the 9ft XXH Tackle Industries musky rods on occasion. These rods will allow you to cast the furthest for their length.

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I used to take out a Lot of Gilligans on my boat and they always would loose tackle. so if you had a dozen lines all stuck on the bottom it could get expensive really quick. as I was winterizing boats as a side job to help pay the bills,I would end up with hundreds of spark plugs. ( Twin chevy 350s or Ford 351 and you get 16 sinkers)  per job.  Justs take some crappy old lightweight mono line and clip on as many sinkers as you need to hit bottom, great for fishing wrecks, rockpiles etc.  for Flounder, COD, Tautaog  So you loose a few hundred sinkers in a day, They are Biodegradable. they rust out and the Ceramic turns back into Sand after a while.

spark.jpg

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If your fishing the drift in the river use slinky weights. They’re just shot and parancord you can get a kit to make your own waay cheaper then buying them, and you can make what ever size you want then also. 

you melt the end of the para cord and press it flat to seal them and punch a hole thrrough the melted portion for a swivel

 

C39F795D-9585-4911-8B93-7C65E36D9C9A.jpeg

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2 hours ago, TheBoat said:

I used to take out a Lot of Gilligans on my boat and they always would loose tackle. so if you had a dozen lines all stuck on the bottom it could get expensive really quick. as I was winterizing boats as a side job to help pay the bills,I would end up with hundreds of spark plugs. ( Twin chevy 350s or Ford 351 and you get 16 sinkers)  per job.  Justs take some crappy old lightweight mono line and clip on as many sinkers as you need to hit bottom, great for fishing wrecks, rockpiles etc.  for Flounder, COD, Tautaog  So you loose a few hundred sinkers in a day, They are Biodegradable. they rust out and the Ceramic turns back into Sand after a while.

spark.jpg

 

I used to use those as a kid.

 

They make great sinkers for lakes and slow current.

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