Maine Guide

Canal Footwear?

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3 hours ago, CaryGreene said:

The layering system I mentioned, breathable pants, insulated fishing pants if desired and some type of bathing suit with underwear built in (I use Patagonia Baggies as they're called 7" in-seem) is  pretty nice because you've just got the completely waterproof vibram soled studded boots, made for use in saltwater with the neoprene socks folded over the top of them. Sand and gravel stays completely out and it's a perfect setup for rock hopping.

I went from stocking foot waders to wading pants to the Chota’s. That was my evolution. 

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18 hours ago, Tailslap said:

My setup has no issue with slimy rocks. Which is basically anywhere near the waters edge. The key is to use small spikes so your boot soles still make contact with the rocks. No high spikes like the strap on Korkers. Bubble weed is still a no go for my setup. 

The problem with a slimy rock is when you shift your weight, which you might even not realize you're doing while casting or possibly fighting a fish. If there's a layer of green algae and the rock is wet I always try to find someplace else to stand. The canal has a good number of bear rocks that make decent perches. 

 

Often though we have to walk over these slippery rocks and that's where the studs provide much more sure footing than without.

 

As far as a rock covered in bubble weed, I won't even go near them. The bubble weed can be thick enough to wear the small spike won't even get through it and what's under the bubble weed is probably green slime. 

 

I think using common sense with the spikes is probably the best way to go. The spikes will allow you to get out on some premium purches where they are a little sketchy but you can safely stand and fish. 

 

I've seen and heard people fall & the knock their bones make actually echoes. I've done the same on the AuSable River a few times in my youth up in the Adirondacks.

 

I grew up on the cobblestone rocks around the Catskills and they're not nearly as sketchy. Jetty's are always sketchy around the waterline but thankfully there's almost always a little bare rock here and there so the studs will allow you to fish near the water's surface or land fish when needed. 

 

I've come very close to falling a few times even with the studded boots and it's usually a bubble weed covered rock that I decided to try to walk across. 

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4 hours ago, CaryGreene said:

The problem with a slimy rock is when you shift your weight, which you might even not realize you're doing while casting or possibly fighting a fish. If there's a layer of green algae and the rock is wet I always try to find someplace else to stand. The canal has a good number of bear rocks that make decent perches. 

 

Often though we have to walk over these slippery rocks and that's where the studs provide much more sure footing than without.

 

As far as a rock covered in bubble weed, I won't even go near them. The bubble weed can be thick enough to wear the small spike won't even get through it and what's under the bubble weed is probably green slime. 

 

I think using common sense with the spikes is probably the best way to go. The spikes will allow you to get out on some premium purches where they are a little sketchy but you can safely stand and fish. 

 

I've seen and heard people fall & the knock their bones make actually echoes. I've done the same on the AuSable River a few times in my youth up in the Adirondacks.

 

I grew up on the cobblestone rocks around the Catskills and they're not nearly as sketchy. Jetty's are always sketchy around the waterline but thankfully there's almost always a little bare rock here and there so the studs will allow you to fish near the water's surface or land fish when needed. 

 

I've come very close to falling a few times even with the studded boots and it's usually a bubble weed covered rock that I decided to try to walk across. 

I use a combo of these on my Simms G3 guide boots and I am like a mountain goat on slimy rocks. I am still careful of course but this combo of spikes with a very supportive boot has been life changing on slippery rocks. I still stay away from bubble weed though. 

773E56D2-BBA9-4510-AFEB-E56CA493E65A.jpeg

8C63C7BD-C0E3-4D45-9B00-4DF3FF7941ED.jpeg

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Muck boots were my go to for years. Waterproof, comfortable, and provided plenty of traction. Then I had a situation where I almost slid right into the canal going down a steep area covered in bubble weed...the Muck boots barely stopped my slide. Then I had another slip where I dislocated my finger nicely while maneuvering down the rocks to land a fish. That was dumb as I generally make sure I'm well planted before I start to cast, but I saw a big swirl and couldn't control myself. Landed the fish though. Now I wear my Korkers, and find them to be just great. The biggest thing is knowing where you're going and what your best route to the water is, even in the dark. That only comes with time.

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On 4/16/2021 at 11:36 AM, Stripedlivesmatter said:

I use korkers with studds in the bottom definitely saved me from falling a few times.

Korkers with studs all the time now.  Worth it.  Buy some neoprene socks to help fill out the boots.  Very secure on the wet slimy rocks.  

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..Bubble weed/ @ OP

you're probably familiar with this but when possible I put foot pressure along the same direction the weed settled when the tide dropped out, and draped it over the rock. Weed stays taut and fixed. Going cross grain or against the grain just rolls it loosely back over itself, like a rolling sheet of BBs. And you go along for the ride.

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Some great advice and tips from all of you. Thanks guys. 

 

I hope everyone has a  safe season at the Canal and avoids a nasty fall by reading these pages. 

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14 hours ago, Tailslap said:

I use a combo of these on my Simms G3 guide boots and I am like a mountain goat on slimy rocks. I am still careful of course but this combo of spikes with a very supportive boot has been life changing on slippery rocks. I still stay away from bubble weed though. 

773E56D2-BBA9-4510-AFEB-E56CA493E65A.jpeg

8C63C7BD-C0E3-4D45-9B00-4DF3FF7941ED.jpeg

used these on 2 sets of hip waders worked like a champ but worked their way through by end of year -- both pairs are now ruined...   Has anyone had the same issue....   Love them but !!!   Thanks for any input

 

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9 hours ago, tper said:

used these on 2 sets of hip waders worked like a champ but worked their way through by end of year -- both pairs are now ruined...   Has anyone had the same issue....   Love them but !!!   Thanks for any input

 

The spikes worked there way through the boots? I have only used these with Simms wading boots. No issues here. 

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On 4/21/2021 at 5:07 AM, tper said:

used these on 2 sets of hip waders worked like a champ but worked their way through by end of year -- both pairs are now ruined...   Has anyone had the same issue....   Love them but !!!   Thanks for any input

 

The reason they wore through is that a boot foot sole has no "mounting" locations or anchor points. The wading boots we are all talking about are made by numerous companies & they feature stud mounting spots, where the stud can screw into. The Inner sole of these boots will never be penetrated by the stud. 

 

Cheap studs wear out quickly also, where as better studs last a lot longer. Simms Studs are pretty long lasting. Korkers studs wear out a little quicker & knock off studs will wear out really quickly. That's why I recommend trying not to walk on concrete. Always stay on the grass as you approach your spot. 

 

With just a studded wading boot & a simple neoprene sock, the issue of rock hopping is solved. Your foot by the way will get wet. But, the neoprene sock insulates & your feet will never be cold unless you're fishing in the extremely early spring or winter. In which case, wear waders to stay dry or bump up to 5mm socks & wool socks under them, 

 

These types of wading boots not only have the mounting spots for studs but the sole of the boot is flexible enough so that you can hop around & walk very comfortably - providing your boots fit properly. 

 

Again, felt doesn't hold up plus, it's ** fallen out of favor ** so I recommend the Vibram soles for Saltwater. For freshwater, Felt works nicely in terms of gripping power on wet rocks. There is no material I've every tried that works better. Unfortunately, it doesn't wear too well. Good, thick, quality felt is really hard to beat on wet rocks, however, re-soling becomes an issue.

 

Some companies now sell different types of detachable soles, none of which hold up well compared to a one piece sole. They give you a wafer thin, chinsey piece of Felt on their detachable soles also. For this reason, the Vibram soles are absolutely the way to go for durability, but make no mistake, they DO NOT grip as well as felt. That's why wading boot companies started making them compatible with screw in studs. 

 

Regarding felt, there is also concern regarding problems with micro-algae living for months in the felt & then, when anglers move from one river to the next, they can transmit these harmful microbes which lead to unintentional contamination. 

 

One example of this is in the Catskills, where Rock-Snot known as Didymo (Didymosphenia geminata), has strangled off the substrate of the upper main stem of the Delaware river, killing off aquatic insect life & threatening the fishery. 

 

Anglers who fish freshwater are therefore advised to buy Vibram soled boots to help stop the transmission of this microscopic algae (diatom) that can produce large amounts of stalk material to form thick brown mats on stream bottoms. Didymo threatens aquatic habitats, biodiversity and recreational opportunities.

 

(Native to northern North America and Europe, didymo has rapidly expanded its range, invading streams in several western states before moving east. Didymo has been found in several major New York water-based recreational rivers.)

 

**Historically, didymo has been found in cool, clear, nutrient poor waters but has expanded its worldwide distribution to include nutrient rich waters. Rivers with stable, regulated flows are particularly at risk.

 

Back in the day, we used to glue felt to our rubber waders. When it wore out, we'd slap another sole over the old one & glue it in place. We used Barge Cement for resoling Felt-Soled boots. Barge Cement has been around since 1970. It's handy to have a can around for boot repairs as needed. 

 

60819bb1d5430_Screenshot2021-04-2211_49_53AM.png.1616d3c2a353ea16beb7e52141c08bd0.png

 

As I mentioned earlier in the thread, though they sell studded felt-soled boots, changing the studs is really not fun. It's hard to find the exact anchor point & it can be very frustrating farting with your wading boots for hours. Ultimately, Felt has gone the way of the dinosaur & for Saltwater guys, just do one piece Vibram if you want the best wearing, least frustrating studded boot experience. 

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On 4/22/2021 at 0:01 PM, CaryGreene said:

The reason they wore through is that a boot foot sole has no "mounting" locations or anchor points. The wading boots we are all talking about are made by numerous companies & they feature stud mounting spots, where the stud can screw into. The Inner sole of these boots will never be penetrated by the stud. 

 

Cheap studs wear out quickly also, where as better studs last a lot longer. Simms Studs are pretty long lasting. Korkers studs wear out a little quicker & knock off studs will wear out really quickly. That's why I recommend trying not to walk on concrete. Always stay on the grass as you approach your spot. 

 

With just a studded wading boot & a simple neoprene sock, the issue of rock hopping is solved. Your foot by the way will get wet. But, the neoprene sock insulates & your feet will never be cold unless you're fishing in the extremely early spring or winter. In which case, wear waders to stay dry or bump up to 5mm socks & wool socks under them, 

 

These types of wading boots not only have the mounting spots for studs but the sole of the boot is flexible enough so that you can hop around & walk very comfortably - providing your boots fit properly. 

 

Again, felt doesn't hold up plus, it's ** fallen out of favor ** so I recommend the Vibram soles for Saltwater. For freshwater, Felt works nicely in terms of gripping power on wet rocks. There is no material I've every tried that works better. Unfortunately, it doesn't wear too well. Good, thick, quality felt is really hard to beat on wet rocks, however, re-soling becomes an issue.

 

Some companies now sell different types of detachable soles, none of which hold up well compared to a one piece sole. They give you a wafer thin, chinsey piece of Felt on their detachable soles also. For this reason, the Vibram soles are absolutely the way to go for durability, but make no mistake, they DO NOT grip as well as felt. That's why wading boot companies started making them compatible with screw in studs. 

 

Regarding felt, there is also concern regarding problems with micro-algae living for months in the felt & then, when anglers move from one river to the next, they can transmit these harmful microbes which lead to unintentional contamination. 

 

One example of this is in the Catskills, where Rock-Snot known as Didymo (Didymosphenia geminata), has strangled off the substrate of the upper main stem of the Delaware river, killing off aquatic insect life & threatening the fishery. 

 

Anglers who fish freshwater are therefore advised to buy Vibram soled boots to help stop the transmission of this microscopic algae (diatom) that can produce large amounts of stalk material to form thick brown mats on stream bottoms. Didymo threatens aquatic habitats, biodiversity and recreational opportunities.

 

(Native to northern North America and Europe, didymo has rapidly expanded its range, invading streams in several western states before moving east. Didymo has been found in several major New York water-based recreational rivers.)

 

**Historically, didymo has been found in cool, clear, nutrient poor waters but has expanded its worldwide distribution to include nutrient rich waters. Rivers with stable, regulated flows are particularly at risk.

 

Back in the day, we used to glue felt to our rubber waders. When it wore out, we'd slap another sole over the old one & glue it in place. We used Barge Cement for resoling Felt-Soled boots. Barge Cement has been around since 1970. It's handy to have a can around for boot repairs as needed. 

 

60819bb1d5430_Screenshot2021-04-2211_49_53AM.png.1616d3c2a353ea16beb7e52141c08bd0.png

 

As I mentioned earlier in the thread, though they sell studded felt-soled boots, changing the studs is really not fun. It's hard to find the exact anchor point & it can be very frustrating farting with your wading boots for hours. Ultimately, Felt has gone the way of the dinosaur & for Saltwater guys, just do one piece Vibram if you want the best wearing, least frustrating studded boot experience. 

Very informative. Thank you 

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Korkers wading boots with studded sole.  Also use wading neoprene socks.  Better fit than regular socks.  And if for some reason you need to go in the water not a big deal.  

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