Pma531

Can someone for the love of god identify this stuff?

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Nah, not crab grass.  I've got it too, but damned if I know what its name is.  I'm from the, "if it's green and it's grass, it's OK with me" school of lawn care.  I do put down pre-emergent crab grass killer though...

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1 hour ago, Roccus7 said:

Nah, not crab grass.  I've got it too, but damned if I know what its name is.  I'm from the, "if it's green and it's grass, it's OK with me" school of lawn care.  I do put down pre-emergent crab grass killer though...

That's how I am.  If it is green it is grass.

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I dunno...sure looks like crab grass to me...did you do any spot seeding at one point? Some of the cheaper contractor seed has some grasses that grow quickly, and have other inert seeds mixed in.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

  Noticed those fast growing tufts last couple seasons. They are firmer bladed and a different color than most turf grasses. Because it’s a grass, selectives like weed b gone won’t work. It pulls out in a complete clump easy enough.

Edited by cheech
Spell

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I appreciate all the responses. I’m gonna try a couple different options. 


The builder sodded in late fall last year. Roots never full set and it went dormant. I didn’t put pre emergent down fearing it would stop the sod roots from setting. I guess this is the result. I’m thinking whatever it is was in the sod when it got delivered. I’m was exited about having a nice lawn this year. I’ve got get rid of it. I’ll let you guys know how I turn out. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Yellow Nutsedge 
Yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus) is a troublesome, difficult-to-control weed that
is often found in turf areas (Figure 1). It is also called chufa, nutgrass, or watergrass.
It is important to remember that yellow nutsedge is not
a grass or broadleaf weed,
but a sedge. Understanding
this plant’s biology makes it easier to know how to best control it. This publication describes the life cycle and identification of yellow nutsedge and recommends cultural and chemical management options for homeowners.
  All photos by Aaron Patton except Figure 2 by Corey Gerber, Purdue Extension.
Life Cycle and Identification
Yellow nutsedge is a perennial plant that reproduces primarily by small underground tubers — called nutlets — that form at the end of underground stems — called rhizomes (Figure 2). A single plant can produce several hundred of these tubers during the summer. Yellow nutsedge can also spread by rhizomes (Figure 3). Yellow nutsedge produces a seedhead when unmown, but its seeds rarely germinate.
Yellow nutsedge actively grows during the heat of summer when cool-season turf grows more slowly. Yellow nutsedge typically emerges (germinates
from tubers) in Indiana in late April or May (a few weeks after crabgrass germinates) and grows actively until the first frost in autumn. A frost will kill the plant’s aboveground portion but the tubers will survive and overwinter in the soil. Dormant tubers can germinate and emerge throughout the following season or survive in the soil for more than three years

Edited by ccb

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1 hour ago, ccb said:

Yellow Nutsedge 
Yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus) is a troublesome, difficult-to-control weed that
is often found in turf areas (Figure 1). It is also called chufa, nutgrass, or watergrass.
It is important to remember that yellow nutsedge is not
a grass or broadleaf weed,
but a sedge. Understanding
this plant’s biology makes it easier to know how to best control it. This publication describes the life cycle and identification of yellow nutsedge and recommends cultural and chemical management options for homeowners.
  All photos by Aaron Patton except Figure 2 by Corey Gerber, Purdue Extension.
Life Cycle and Identification
Yellow nutsedge is a perennial plant that reproduces primarily by small underground tubers — called nutlets — that form at the end of underground stems — called rhizomes (Figure 2). A single plant can produce several hundred of these tubers during the summer. Yellow nutsedge can also spread by rhizomes (Figure 3). Yellow nutsedge produces a seedhead when unmown, but its seeds rarely germinate.
Yellow nutsedge actively grows during the heat of summer when cool-season turf grows more slowly. Yellow nutsedge typically emerges (germinates
from tubers) in Indiana in late April or May (a few weeks after crabgrass germinates) and grows actively until the first frost in autumn. A frost will kill the plant’s aboveground portion but the tubers will survive and overwinter in the soil. Dormant tubers can germinate and emerge throughout the following season or survive in the soil for more than three years

 And  Very tough to get rid of. Every year  i spray it and real grass dies but not nutsedge

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I hand pulled the clumps every time I walked by and it all disappeared. “Sedges have edges”, maybe the op can describe the leaf. I’m  finding Wild Violet a much tougher opponent.

Edited by cheech

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