Chass510

Fast action rods - casting

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Hey guys, happy easter.

 

I guess i've been used to more moderate rods my entire fishing life - 

 

can anyone shed tips on how to cast a fast action rod? How much line to give the lure for the cast?

 

Thanks guys !

 

(Using a 10'6" TFO)

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I usually keep my plug by the bottom guide. If  the rod still won’t  load let out a little more line. 

Edited by webfoot44

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You have to lay in to it a little more and follow through on your cast - moderate rods do a lot of the casting work for you while you do more of the work with a fast rod.. kinda like a catapult with a fast rod vs a slingshot with moderate. I love my 9’ TFO for metals and jigs but when I switch back to something more moderate I have to remember to slow it down a bit and let the rod do it’s thing or else I’ll send a plug tumbling through the air when I try to power cast it like I do with a fast action.

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Hard to describe. Most casters push hard with the top hand while pulling down on the butt of the rod. This allows the top hand to travel out in front of you like a punch and the rod travels in an arc. I think you will bet better results if you focus on the bottom hand pulling the rod down hard while the top hand moves a short distance staring in front of the shoulder. When done correctly there is less body motion and a bit more snap.  I was taught that at 15 and now I’m 50. It made a big difference to me with fiberglass and graphite. 
 

 

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Casting and baseball share characteristics look at your footing and arm speed. Some batters plant themselves in a box feet ( Ken Griffey)stationery and follow thru. Others like A rod raises leg and moves. Casting a fast action rod gives and does not transmit the same energy as a firmer medium to heavy action rod. The fit of a rod for instance put your hand on your spinning reel then put the rod to your arm pit. A good fit for most will be butt is a tight fit inside your arm pit. Longer or shorter usually results in a loss of casting difference. Technique take an exaggerated stylish cast let 6 to 7 foot hang on a 13 foot rod swing forward then bring the lure back to load then fire off a cast. Quite stylish but my almost one foot taller than my fishing buddy throwing a 1164 with the same test line beat me consistently with a simple drop back pause then follow thru like Ken Griffey. The faster action rods do offer forgiveness for the braid that was previously available with the mono. Just some good ole memories.

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I have found that I can hang less line to get distance with a faster action rod. Moderate maybe another foot of line. You will have to do more work with the faster action rod than with a moderate. Every rod is different. There are no, moderate / fast / slow standards.

 

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On ‎4‎/‎5‎/‎2021 at 0:06 AM, Tyger92 said:

You have to lay in to it a little more and follow through on your cast - moderate rods do a lot of the casting work for you while you do more of the work with a fast rod.. kinda like a catapult with a fast rod vs a slingshot with moderate. I love my 9’ TFO for metals and jigs but when I switch back to something more moderate I have to remember to slow it down a bit and let the rod do it’s thing or else I’ll send a plug tumbling through the air when I try to power cast it like I do with a fast action.

Yeah, that pesky "muscle-memory". If you change rods often while fishing it will get you at least once and you'll laugh (to yourself) for forgetting the different actions.

(Speaking from experience)

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I recommend a short push pull arm action keeping rod close to body check out any video of English carp fisherman that use high modulus rods to see what I mean the top hand doesn't move much more of a fulcrum and lower hand pulls the butt into the chest the arms start out extended above the head and the butt is brought into the chest tight and quick 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

From my experience with this very same issue, with the same exact TFO rod.  The "hang" will depend on how fast you cast and what type of cast you are using, but for me using that rod, I was letting my payload hang about half way down the rod and I was using a simple over-head cast. 

 

Assuming you will be doing an overhead (or other casts which arc directly over your head), I will say that you do not need to "follow through" on the cast, biggest mistake i see when people use fast action rods.  The approach with fast action rods is that you need to impart a lot of power in the beginning of the cast with your left-hand push & right-hand pull.  And, the most important aspect to focus on, which is hard to grasp unless you can observe the difference, is to cast "up" at a much higher angle than you're used to with slower rods.  You should not be casting through 12-o'clock.  It is a very weird feeling, almost like you are casting "up", but that is the real trick.   Read the following with the image in your mind that you are "flicking" or "snapping" the payload out there. 

 

Example of my stance/form

- payload hanging 50% down the rod

- feet planted with weight on right, rear-ward foot

- left arm on rod butt, almost straightened at about 45 degrees above the horizontal out in front

- right arm on reel seat, moderately bent, heel of palm slightly above/behind my right ear

- the rod should be nearly parallel to the ground at this point and the payload hanging mostly stationary and almost touching the ground directly behind you

- in one motion with a tense core, push from rear foot, rotating both shoulders forward and pull with your left harm, push with right arm, and to shoot the payload upwards NOT out.  You should be aiming to be releasing the payload a little before the rod travels through the perpendicular.  In truth, the release point is relative to the power you can put into the rod - the more power you can exert, the longer you can hold on, but its a very fine line to walk. 

- Ideally, your entire casting arc will travel approx 90 to 100 degree.  Any more travel is wastes energy and increases likelihood of incorrect release point.

 

Common mistakes

- Releasing too late, you'll know because the payload will "rifle" out in front of you or just break off.  Trust me, release earlier than you're accustomed to, once you understand the feel of casting "up", it will become very apparent how much earlier the release point is on fast rods.  One tip to help get there, is to literally look up 45 degrees from the spot you want to land, and focus on that higher spot throughout your cast.

- Ending the cast with your body hunched over, you pulled your cast down with your core and likely ended up releasing too low/late

- Releasing the cast with the rod out in front of you, artifact of trying to cast "out" instead of "up"

- Letting your left arm collapse into your body, leaving you with only the right-hand-push & core-crunching motions.  Robs you of power and often leads to a late release.

 

Here's a little sketch for you. 

 

IMG_20210408_141851.jpg.435920c73748d9fe97bac3b00ad2b491.jpg

Edited by cbinvb

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