Budlightyear

More rights taken away!

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38 posts in this topic

40 mins ago, bob_G said:

Ok, look budlightyear, for starters, I'm not selling anything.  I'm only repeating what I heard at a Harbormaster's conference.  I'm sorry my recollection of the facts don't mesh with your recreational plans.  But that's the way the chips fall sometimes. :shrug:

 

 

 

Wasn't directed at you at all just in general . The chips don't have to fall that way actually. Sometimes people can get back their rights instead of always losing them . 

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19 mins ago, Budlightyear said:

Wasn't directed at you at all just in general . The chips don't have to fall that way actually. Sometimes people can get back their rights instead of always losing them . 

Understand. ;)

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I've been shoo'ed off the flats inside Tashmoo pond before too. VH harbormaster said no anchoring on the chip chop side probably for the same reason. The towns control the waterways but it seems like the same thing is happening on land.

 

More gates and no trespassing signs going up every day. Won't be long before you will need passes to get into the North Del Boca Vista MV development. Money talks and you can't throw a rock without hitting a billionaire with a big idea how to make your home better for them. 

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I would imagine they don’t want people anchoring up in there and partying or spending the night. They use an environmental issue as an excuse to kick everyone out. Happens everywhere around here in taxachusetts. 
 

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14 mins ago, z-man said:

I would imagine they don’t want people anchoring up in there and partying or spending the night. They use an environmental issue as an excuse to kick everyone out. Happens everywhere around here in taxachusetts. 
 

there are 49 other states

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2 hours ago, FizzyFish said:

there are 49 other states

Certainly is! I feel very blessed to be finally leaving Massachusetts in December for South Dakota! 

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51 mins ago, Lakertaker said:

Certainly is! I feel very blessed to be finally leaving Massachusetts in December for South Dakota! 

I’m not sure I’d want to move to South Dakota but I’ll probably move out of MA once my kids finish school. Most likely south. 

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On 3/24/2021 at 4:53 PM, flylikabird said:

Your anchors are putting a dent in someone's wallet.....clam diggers?

Actually as the moorings are pulled late fall, pre freezing those areas were sometimes quite a score.

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On 3/25/2021 at 8:20 AM, bob_G said:

When I was asst Harbormaster for the Town of Bourne I vaguely recall this topic coming up at one of our many Harbormaster/shellfish constable meetings. 

At the time the MV Harbormaster said he was very concerned that the annual practice of boats anchoring and rafting up in the pond  was impacting the town's lucrative bay scallop fishery.   If my memory serves me, he said indiscriminate anchoring was tearing up the bottom, and destroying the delicate eel grass.  Juvenile bay scallops are extremely delicate, and depend on the eel grass for survival when they are in the larva stage.  It's also important to note, the island's bay scallop fishery has been declining for decades.

 

Again, these are my vague recollections of something that was discussed years ago, and there's probably more to the story.  But it seems this isn't a money grab, or a way to discriminate against transient boaters.  It appears in part that the MV selectmen are attempting to be proactive in protecting their delicate bay scallop fishery.

 

I keep tabs on what's happening on the Vineyard via their online newspapers, since we used to fish there for 15 years, two wks in spring and two wks in fall for stripers & albies. bob_G , above, is correct in what he posted, according to Martha's Vineyard's reasons for closing the anchoring around the Gut beaches. Not only do piping plovers, fishermen's most hated birds, nest there but the lowly seagulls have many, many nests onshore at the Gut. Seagulls nest everywhere, even near dumpsters here on Long Island, NY,  so, I assume their nesting protection wasn't addressed at the meetings of the MV shore protectors BUT, yes, the eelgrass and the scallop beds were being disturbed which is a big thing. Fishing has greatly fallen off from shore and the Vineyard is trying to address these problems. Not only the fishing, but the scallop industry is very important to the Vineyard. 

Being a fisherman, I support, along with bob_G, his view of why this new non-anchoring law has been passed. The scallop industry on the Vineyard plus the disappearance of the eel grass, which stripers love, has been disappearing. I commend the Vineyard for having established this boating/no anchoring law at the Gut and its perimeters. It's not a matter of rich people vs. others, as some have mentioned. If they don't do this, scallops and fishing industries might be gone from the Vineyard. And, BTW, the "Gut" is the area mentioned. It's not the ocean, like, those who might not know an ocean with surf, etc.? Nope, it's a calm "gut" between two "islands" between which the waters flow, supplementing eel grass and scallops growth. 

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7 mins ago, flysully said:

I keep tabs on what's happening on the Vineyard via their online newspapers, since we used to fish there for 15 years, two wks in spring and two wks in fall for stripers & albies. bob_G , above, is correct in what he posted, according to Martha's Vineyard's reasons for closing the anchoring around the Gut beaches. Not only do piping plovers, fishermen's most hated birds, nest there but the lowly seagulls have many, many nests onshore at the Gut. Seagulls nest everywhere, even near dumpsters here on Long Island, NY,  so, I assume their nesting protection wasn't addressed at the meetings of the MV shore protectors BUT, yes, the eelgrass and the scallop beds were being disturbed which is a big thing. Fishing has greatly fallen off from shore and the Vineyard is trying to address these problems. Not only the fishing, but the scallop industry is very important to the Vineyard. 

Being a fisherman, I support, along with bob_G, his view of why this new non-anchoring law has been passed. The scallop industry on the Vineyard plus the disappearance of the eel grass, which stripers love, has been disappearing. I commend the Vineyard for having established this boating/no anchoring law at the Gut and its perimeters. It's not a matter of rich people vs. others, as some have mentioned. If they don't do this, scallops and fishing industries might be gone from the Vineyard. And, BTW, the "Gut" is the area mentioned. It's not the ocean, like, those who might not know an ocean with surf, etc.? Nope, it's a calm "gut" between two "islands" between which the waters flow, supplementing eel grass and scallops growth. 

One of my hunting buddies from CT used to do very well down there for bay scallops. Then the area got slammed with swans who ate all the eel grass. Today ZERO scallops and the stupid swans that are not "native" are protected. Go figure.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

 

 

3 hours ago, flysully said:

I keep tabs on what's happening on the Vineyard via their online newspapers, since we used to fish there for 15 years, two wks in spring and two wks in fall for stripers & albies. bob_G , above, is correct in what he posted, according to Martha's Vineyard's reasons for closing the anchoring around the Gut beaches. Not only do piping plovers, fishermen's most hated birds, nest there but the lowly seagulls have many, many nests onshore at the Gut. Seagulls nest everywhere, even near dumpsters here on Long Island, NY,  so, I assume their nesting protection wasn't addressed at the meetings of the MV shore protectors BUT, yes, the eelgrass and the scallop beds were being disturbed which is a big thing. Fishing has greatly fallen off from shore and the Vineyard is trying to address these problems. Not only the fishing, but the scallop industry is very important to the Vineyard. 

Being a fisherman, I support, along with bob_G, his view of why this new non-anchoring law has been passed. The scallop industry on the Vineyard plus the disappearance of the eel grass, which stripers love, has been disappearing. I commend the Vineyard for having established this boating/no anchoring law at the Gut and its perimeters. It's not a matter of rich people vs. others, as some have mentioned. If they don't do this, scallops and fishing industries might be gone from the Vineyard. And, BTW, the "Gut" is the area mentioned. It's not the ocean, like, those who might not know an ocean with surf, etc.? Nope, it's a calm "gut" between two "islands" between which the waters flow, supplementing eel grass and scallops growth. 

Yes, as bob_g & flysully said, the Edgartown decision was allegedly about the environmental impact (and impact on the eelgrass beds & by extension the bay scallops, in particular). They have kept a slice of water open for anchoring past the gut, but it will certainly be much more sparse than what we saw last year. If these efforts help preserve the sealife in the area (which helps support the fishery), I’m in favor. Here’s a link to the story on the decision: https://vineyardgazette.com/news/2021/03/22/edgartown-adopts-anchorage-ban-cape-pogue-pond

Edited by OakBluffsAngler
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8 hours ago, z-man said:

How are the scallops harvested? Wouldn’t the harvesting cause more damage to the sea bottom and grass than an anchor?

Not necessarily z man.  During the fall and winter months the eel grass dies off. So dragging for scallops doesn't impact the eel grass at all. 

It begins growing again in the spring when the water and sun get warm.

The scallops spawn in June, and remain in a delicate larva stage all summer, their main source protection are eel grass beds.  So you can understand the importance of eel grass.

Just a footnote. All up and down the coast eel grass is vanishing at an alarming rate. For example, we lost about 90% of our eel grass beds in Bourne and our bay scallop fishery has declined accordingly.

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9 hours ago, z-man said:

How are the scallops harvested? Wouldn’t the harvesting cause more damage to the sea bottom and grass than an anchor?

In CT they used a "looking box" and a net. No affect on the eel grass. I see bobg addressed the issue on harvesting here too.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

48 mins ago, K Foley said:

In CT they used a "looking box" and a net. No affect on the eel grass. I see bobg addressed the issue on harvesting here too.

FWIW, that device is for recreational scalloping, not commercial.

 

 

 

Edited by FizzyFish

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