SeaZen 21

Bottom paint protective gear?

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Hello,

Is any personal protective gear recommended for bottom paint application? I see some pics of folks fully geared up with suits, hoods, and respirators. I assume that’s for sand blasting, or paint removal. Just wanna make sure I don’t need to go all out for just putting on a coat or two. It’s my first time doing it myself, thus the stupid question.  

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no, no need to be a Karen and just paint the damn bottom

 

When I was 17 I was sitting on the ground straddling a trailer tire painting the bottom of my 17, dog tail knocked the can off my fender and into my lap.  I had for real Blue Balls for quite some time.  I'm still alive.

 

Stripping bottom paint is a whole different matter.  Application?  Its thick, its messy...it sucks .just do it

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I wear a tyvek suit, a hat, and safety glasses.  Do not paint directly over your head or body.  Paint areas that you can reach with a stretch-out arm and you should be fine 

Edited by Mono

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I like to wear the white suit. Latex gloves and a hat or even the hood. I use a roller, a pan, a brush and a few rags. If you have every thing prepped masked off it goes quick. I have a 28 ft and maybe 2 to 2.5 hrs. If you need to sand then you may need more PPE and a vac on the sander. If your in a boat yard they will have rules.

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Yes you don't want it on you when painting or when sanding. If it takes a tyvek  suit then use it. If not take some advice from above and below  .bottom paint has copper in it .to much copper not good for you.,must be stired frequently before applying. I usually make a tunnel effect. Put two big fan at the bow blowing out toward the transom when painting and deffintalyy when sanding. Sand or paint not directly above you. Reach out from you and let the fans blow that crap away from you. If you have a creeper on wheels it will let you slide around easily .pallets are handy to keep you off the ground.  . Cut-paint all your edges first and chine then use roller to smooth out your brush work. Less paint  is best on the brush or roller. It goes a long way and go slow otherwise it slings off everywhere.  If you get sanding debris in your breathing you will lose taste buds for a day. Everything taste like crap. Even worse if you smoke and don't wash your hand before hand after sanding.. So eat a big meal before any sanding . Don't forget to check your water line. Drop in water make a mark then tape later. Cheap paint and bad prep gets really bad life on bottom paint. Don't skip steps.

 

Don't get it on any metal etc outboard thur hull etc. 

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You have to sand before you paint, otherwise you won’t get good adhesion with the new paint. The sanding dust is very toxic, wear a respirator.

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Thank you for all the guidance. The boat already has multi season bottom paint done from the marina. The last coat was put on in 2019. I just figured I’d do it this year to be one with the boat. :)

 

I think I just need to sand any loose areas not removed by the power washing when the boat came out of the water then add 2 coats on top of what’s there. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

You will need to sand the hull Even after power washing but you will want to scrap all barnacles or growth before sanding. .  The sanding is to just scuff up the bottom so it can stick to a good  surface since you have bottom paint.. You will need some type of cleaner after sanding and before painting.  Read the direction and see what you can use .plus there is down time between coats pending weather Temps. Usually 2-6 hrs min. 

Edited by 757saltwater

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As I get older I realize all the stuff I have breathed in over the years and becoming more cautious. With the pandemic, I have SOOO many masks, I have no reason to not wear one when painting boats, sanding anything, using cleaners, etc. I even wear one when I'm dropping a #2Z. 

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18 hours ago, SeaZen 21 said:

Thank you for all the guidance. The boat already has multi season bottom paint done from the marina. The last coat was put on in 2019. I just figured I’d do it this year to be one with the boat. :)

 

I think I just need to sand any loose areas not removed by the power washing when the boat came out of the water then add 2 coats on top of what’s there. 

You need to sand the whole thing if you want to do it properly, and you don't need two coats, one coat should do the job nicely. The paint that is still on the boat (assuming it's an ablative paint), has weathered to a powdery surface while the boat has been out of the water. Just run your hand over a section and look at the dust that comes off in your hand. As I said before, you won't get good adhesion of the new paint unless you sand off that surface dust.

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On 3/16/2021 at 0:00 PM, MakoMike said:

You need to sand the whole thing if you want to do it properly, and you don't need two coats, one coat should do the job nicely. The paint that is still on the boat (assuming it's an ablative paint), has weathered to a powdery surface while the boat has been out of the water. Just run your hand over a section and look at the dust that comes off in your hand. As I said before, you won't get good adhesion of the new paint unless you sand off that surface dust.

After sanding, is a fresh water rinse enough to remove the dust or should I use a solvent like denatured alcohol?

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10 mins ago, SeaZen 21 said:

After sanding, is a fresh water rinse enough to remove the dust or should I use a solvent like denatured alcohol?

You really don't need to wash it at all after sanding, but if you want to a water wash will suffice. The dust will come off as you sand it, you might want to use a vacuum hooked up to the sander as you sand. 

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On 3/15/2021 at 5:48 PM, SeaZen 21 said:

Thank you for all the guidance. The boat already has multi season bottom paint done from the marina. The last coat was put on in 2019. I just figured I’d do it this year to be one with the boat. :)

 

I think I just need to sand any loose areas not removed by the power washing when the boat came out of the water then add 2 coats on top of what’s there. 

Did you use a hard or ablative paint?  

 

I get 2 years out of the ablative, 3 if I push it.  I just touch up the waterline to the chine for a fresh look if not doing the whole shebang.

 

When I had the bottom soda blasted a few or more years back, it looked like the freaking moon after 20 years of paint accumulation with areas that hadn't stuck and areas that had.  Prior owner used a hard paint I'm pretty sure.  I did it right and put a base color of dark blue down, then black which is my normal color.  I let it go until I start seeing blue.  No painting for me this year woo hoo, she's black.  So something to think about.

 

You on a trailer, or blocks?  Painting around rollers is the worst and triples the mess.  Worth the time to take her off.  Or at least drop your tongue as low as you can, block the transom, then crank her back up to get some separation.

 

And sanding a boat bottom is the absolute worst job in the world.  Steel yourself for that if you must go that route.  Had to be said.

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