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Emerald Isle - The Point - June 5-12

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I will be in Emerald Isle June 5-12th at "The Point". What should I expect to catch at that time of year from the surf and how to catch them? Thanks in advance for any info you can share.

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A great time to fish Emerald Isle. Ya never know what you’ll be catching there that time of year. Pups, Spanish, sea mullet, blues, pomp’s, flounder, you name it. Throw out a bait on a fishfinder and some Fishbites on a  multi-hook bottom rig. Sandfleas, shrimp, finger mullet, bunker or whatever panfish you catch for bait. Then cast some lures, paddle tails and metal recommend. Driving access closes on April 30, so we won’t be around. Try the Bouge Inlet pier, too. Give pin rigging a shot for a king or cobia. Those are fish of a lifetime and will give you memories that last forever. 

Edited by Rougesun

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This area is great.  I have never fished that early in the summer, but it might be better than when I have been there?

 

I caught a bunch of Spanish mackerel and blues in the mornings and evenings.  It seemed to be an hour or two window from sunrise then again an hour or two window before sunset.  If you have an 8'-10' spoon slinger, that is preferred, but not necessary.  It gets you the extra distance and handles the stress of casting 3/4oz-2oz of lead.  I use an Okuma "salmon rod".  Much easier to cast after cast than a surf rod.

 

Use a good 3'-10' of either flour or mono leader.  I use 30# @ 7' of mono.  I have used 20# flouro but they bite through too easily.  30# flouro is probably idea.  I use 20# power pro braid as main line.  I can cast probably 50-60 yards?  Last time that I went, no need to wade out.  I was standing right in the wash area, getting bites at the end of my cast, all of the way until about 20 yards out.  Using lead casting spoons.  If there is a long shore current, cast a little "up stream" of the current and reel in fast, but not too fast.  People say to real as fast as you can, but often that will make your lure spin if current.  They will hit if not reeling as fast as you can.  Have your drag set loose, but not too loose...  The big ones hit hard and you will pull your hook if you don't allow them a chance to run.  They seem to have one or two initial runs, will jump, then not too hard to get in.  If your drag is too tight, those initial runs will widen the hole of your hook set, then as soon as they jump, you are losing that fish.  Go to the local tackle shops and ask around of what they recommend.  Don't stop at Walmart to save a buck.  These guys will have you on fish and well worth the extra few bucks.  The pandemic hit them much harder than Walmart.

 

I seemed to do best on the outgoing tide, my thought is bait being washed out.  But the morning and evening are key.  Swim during the day.  But this was also later July.

 

If the surf isn't ideal for surf fishing, the pier should have some fish further out.  Spanish mackerel and blues will be from mid pier to the end.  Gotcha plugs seem to be the go to.  For these a smaller rod (7' medium) works best.  Similar set up with the braid and mono.  I also add an 18" section of 50# flouro.  I have found that they seem to hit Gotcha plugs from the side, as opposed to the casting spoons from behind.  Usually more in the schools out on the pier too.  Get a nice one on, then his buddy tries to steal it from his mouth and bites him free.  I have always read to stay away from steel leaders.  50# bite leader reduces bites too.  I went out one day using 20# flouro and had 4 plugs bit off in 20 minutes, put that bite leader on, bites went down a bit, but landed every fish.  Finding your own happy medium is key.

 

Other years we stayed further from the inlet and did well fishing sand fleas on pompano rigs (which we couldn't find any fleas last time there).  We caught mostly sea mullet (southern kingfish or whiting, they have many names), pompano and black drum.

 

The inlet itself will have fish too.  If you have a cast net, it is great.  The back side of the inlet is filled with mullet.  Toss one of those on and throw into the inlet and you will get a bite on almost every cast (usually bluefish or big lizzard fish).  In the sound itself, there are a good bit of trout, flounder and redfish, but the access is really bad in EI.  Almost all private property.  If things are rough out front, well worth renting a kayak for a day or two on the sound side.

 

Low tide at the point is pretty cool for smaller kids.  Not the best for fishing.  I'm sure it changes every year, but the sandbar that the inlet created when we were last there, reached out into the ocean probably 100 yards.  Which made for basically a large swimming pool.  That was pretty cool for swimming and just a change of the normal ocean, but for fishing, it didn't help,.

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Porktown is correct on many if not all things listed above. Every time I have fished that area near sunset, have a rod with a silver ready for the blue blitz. 

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