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afishhunter

Question on the Ecomomics

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I can get a ready to fish by simply adding a reel with line, running the line through the guides, and adding a lure/jig/spoon or baited hook to the terminal end of the line, 9 or 10 foot IM-8 graphite Salmon - Steelhead spinning rod, with either Shimano or Fuji (I'm not sure which) guides and reel seat off Amazon for under $60 shipped, including sales tax.

 

I only have a Mud Hole catalog. 

I admit there may be/probably is at least one lower cost than Mud Hole rod building suppliers.

 

At any rate, $60 does not come even close to covering the cost of a comparable 9 or 10 foot IM-8 graphite rod blank at Mud Hole; let alone the rod blank and all the other required components.

 

My question:

If not to save money, what is the point or advantage of building a rod vs buying and using a considerably less expensive factory built rod, using the same brand rod blank (St. Croix, for example) with the same Shimano or Fuji guides, reel seat, and grip/handle you would buy at Mud Hole or some other supplier?

 

How is the made at home rod "better" than the considerably less expensive factory rod using the exact same rod blank and components?

 

I understand some (but not all) builders spine the rod ... or at least they used to. I don't see the spineing and guide placement tools/guages for sale in the last three Mud Hole main (thick) catalogs.

I know some (but not all) factory rods used to be spined. I don't know if any still are.

 

Please forgive me. I don't understand the economics,  or how a factory rod is somehow inferior to a rod someone (or something) like me with zero or less skill, might make at home, even if I had all the fancy rod wrapping rollers, drier, thread tensioners, and other required tools ... or how acquiring the special equipment and tools to build one rod is economically viable, for that matter.

 

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One issue i would have is the guide layout. The stock layouts are usually not very good, specially on surf rods. Handle material and sizing and quality of workmanship. In addition Fuji guides is a broad category, different frame and ring materials are very different in price. but if all of that is actually equal and the rod s feel the same buy the stock one or find a better builder

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 Forget about the bling.  If you have ever fished with a custom rod from a reputable rod builder you will never be happy fishing a production rod again.  Mike, above, is just scratching the surface.

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First off Shimano doesn't make guides, and I doubt quality Fuji guides are on a $60 rod and there are many tiers of quality and materials at Fuji, or any others guide company. Second, you are quaranteed that the guides on that rod were not placed in the optimal place, to do that you have to know the line and reel being used. Third the rod being made of IM8 means virtually nothing, it's how you use it and what is used to bond it all together that is important. All rods are composites, a mixture of graphite or glass, scrim for hoop strength and a bonding agent, some of the high end designs now no longer use scrim, depending on high end resins to pick up the slack this keeps the modulus and quality of the finished blank higher. Fourth, because nothing is optimized will be to heavy, poorly balanced, insensitive, in short a mediocre piece of flotsam. If you like that sort of thing and you don't value your time on the water, or beach there is a great selection of junk at Wally World.

P. S. When the reel seat comes loose, your guides fail, or rot off, don't be surprised, I just hope you don't have a real nice, or fish of a lifetime on when it happens. My rods are just pennies compared to money I have spent just getting to the places I have fished, throwing away all that money and time on crap gear failures is just beyond comprehension. 

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52 mins ago, spoonplugger1 said:

First off Shimano doesn't make guides, and I doubt quality Fuji guides are on a $60 rod and there are many tiers of quality and materials at Fuji, or any others guide company. Second, you are quaranteed that the guides on that rod were not placed in the optimal place, to do that you have to know the line and reel being used. Third the rod being made of IM8 means virtually nothing, it's how you use it and what is used to bond it all together that is important. All rods are composites, a mixture of graphite or glass, scrim for hoop strength and a bonding agent, some of the high end designs now no longer use scrim, depending on high end resins to pick up the slack this keeps the modulus and quality of the finished blank higher. Fourth, because nothing is optimized will be to heavy, poorly balanced, insensitive, in short a mediocre piece of flotsam. If you like that sort of thing and you don't value your time on the water, or beach there is a great selection of junk at Wally World.

P. S. When the reel seat comes loose, your guides fail, or rot off, don't be surprised, I just hope you don't have a real nice, or fish of a lifetime on when it happens. My rods are just pennies compared to money I have spent just getting to the places I have fished, throwing away all that money and time on crap gear failures is just beyond comprehension. 

I was forced to retire for mrdical reasons 3 years ago.

I am also disabled.

2 years ago I had a "mild" stroke, according to the doctors.

I am in an assisted living facility now.

After rent, I have less than $50 a month.

Makes it rather diffucult to get a hand made custom fishing rod.

 

The (your term) "garbage" rods at Walmart, Bass Pro, and other retailers that I've purchased over the last 60 years have never fallen apart, or broken with a fish on.

 

When did Shimano quit making fishing rod components?

 

Back in 2000-2010 it seemed all the "good" rods had Shimano or Fuju guides ... or ALCO, I think it was, roller guides ...

 

Sorry I am not wealthy enough to have equipment and gear that you consider worthwhile.

 

The hell with it.

@Tim S

Please cancel my membership and ban me from the site, so I don't insukt/offend anyobe else by being here.

 

I'm gone.

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Afishhunter, sorry to hear about your current health. Just got home myself from the hospital today. Please don’t quit on us there is much to learn and share here.

 

The economics of it comes down to you can’t compare a $60 rod to a $120 rod.

Grade of components and blank materials all factor into the price.


As per your example, a $60 factory rod will cost more than that in parts to build yourself with the same materials. Why? Because the manufacturer buys in bulk wholesale and sells thousands of that particular rod.  You are buying one blank, set of guides etc. at full retail.


Will a factory rod work? Yes. Is a custom better? Yes and no. 
Some factory rods are as good as custom right off the rack. Take a look at Century, St.Croix, ODM etc. they are make excellent rods you can get at your local shop.


With a custom you get something more tailored to fit you and your style of fishing. That is something you can’t get off the rack hence the premium on the price.

 

If there is something custom you were looking to do and your current situation doesn’t allow for it, I would be happy to help you out. We could maybe find parts for cheap and I will wrap anything for you free of charge

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Posted (edited)

I enjoy building rods during the winter. It’s not so much about the $$ but I built it and it helps pass the time on cold days. My kids all have a rod or two that I built for them. Those are not about the money. I guess I could have ordered off Amazon.

Edited by Wfmdfm1

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11 hours ago, afishhunter said:

After rent, I have less than $50 a month.

 

 

The last thing I'd be looking at is buying fishing rods

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Posted (edited)

11 hours ago, Billy 40 said:

 

The last thing I'd be looking at is buying fishing rods

If I hadn't just been gifted a 1950's vintage ALVEY Number 36 Side Cast reel by a member of a knife forum, (who just happens to reside in New South Wales, Australia) I wouldn't be....

 

I do have a 1960's(?) 1970's(?) 9 or 10 foot spinning rod with a bad tip top.

Maybe I'll just cut off the grip and seat, (yes. not shortening the rod.) put on a (cork) Tennessee handle, graphite slip rings, and new tip top...

I've not seen the rod since the day I had the stroke ... as far as I remember, it don't need any other guides replaced ... or re-done ...

 

Question:

When replacing a tip top, is "hot melt" glue required or can you use a 5 minute two part epoxy?

Is the two part 5 minute epoxy acceptable to glue the cork grip on, or would that be "asking for trouble"?

 

Edited by afishhunter
repair a typo.

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