Jump to content

Carp Fishing? who does or did?


RAW

Recommended Posts

Got into carping last year, found a great spot in South Hadley right above brunells marina. Spent many summer nights on a nice sand beach with a fire and friends. 8 people caught their biggest fish ever, including 2 30lbers. It's a great way to fish with friends that aren't as into fishing as you might be

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, shanation said:

Got into carping last year, found a great spot in South Hadley right above brunells marina. Spent many summer nights on a nice sand beach with a fire and friends. 8 people caught their biggest fish ever, including 2 30lbers. It's a great way to fish with friends that aren't as into fishing as you might be

I know the island well. Camped there. Years ago across from Brunelles slightly down river was a piggery/ slaughter house. Carp loved it. Down river is a tent site with big cats. Have fun

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/7/2021 at 10:20 PM, Popasilov said:

I was planing trip to upstate NY for last few years, just for the carp fishing. there are two or three lakes that hold a big carps and it is on my "to do" list before I move out of NY.

Two or three lakes? How about every lake up here? All finger lakes have them, Lake Ontario, Lake George, Barge canal, Onondaga Lake, St. Lawrence river, you name it.....

That's all I do when I fish, catch carp in Upstate NY.

There are several carp clubs including American Carp Society and Onondaga County Carper.

 

The best way to catch more than just a few is to chum. Get a 50 Lb bag of deer corn, soak it in hot water with sugar, then bring to a boil and put in a cooler to cook itself overtime. Then throw it in a lake with good access and clear shores, and bring a camera and landing net.

 

One thing to keep in mind: your father was right about the way carp eat. Therefore, you can increase your chances by fishing a hair rig. Google it and then make one and fish it with 1 or 2 oz of lead. And a baitrunner reel helps a lot to prevent losing your rod and reel to a quick running carp.

 

Thanks - Carpniels

Fisherman with 4 sons. I hope they all catch the 'bug' so I have a good excuse to leave the house and go fishing.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/8/2021 at 6:18 AM, oc1 said:

Common carp adversely affect all of those.  Which would you rather catch.

From what I have read, this is not entirely true. Americans think this is true, but it's false science. In the 60s, 70s, and 80s, the water quality went down. SMB, LMB, walleye and perch populations went down due to the water quality going down. Hardy fish like carp were not impacted as much by the declining water quality, so their population remained about the same. So same number of carp, lower numbers of 'game' fish, and the carp get blamed. However, A did not cause B; A and B were caused by C. It wasn't a causal relationship.

 

Bluegill eat more game fish eggs than any other species. And they're native....

 

Carpniels

Fisherman with 4 sons. I hope they all catch the 'bug' so I have a good excuse to leave the house and go fishing.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Carpniels said:

From what I have read, this is not entirely true. Americans think this is true, but it's false science. In the 60s, 70s, and 80s, the water quality went down. SMB, LMB, walleye and perch populations went down due to the water quality going down. Hardy fish like carp were not impacted as much by the declining water quality, so their population remained about the same. So same number of carp, lower numbers of 'game' fish, and the carp get blamed. However, A did not cause B; A and B were caused by C. It wasn't a causal relationship.

 

Bluegill eat more game fish eggs than any other species. And they're native....

 

Carpniels

Spot on

 

If anything carp fry will provide good forage for game fish.

I fish fine

look stupid 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When the U.S. Fish Commission started stocking carp in the late 1800's, entire ecosystems were changed by the way carp feed.  They completely change the epibenthic layer, muddy the water and affect everything living above.  The changes were so dramatic that you didn't need to be a fisheries expert or even a casual fisherman to notice it.  There was a public outcry and the government carp stocking program soon shifted to a government carp eradication program.  Fisheries people were trying to figure out how to get rid of the things, but it was already too late. 

 

So, to evaluate the impact of carp you need to compare sportfish populations from pre-1877 to sportfish populations post-1900.  Water quality degradation in the later half of the 1900's is a different issue.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 hours ago, oc1 said:

When the U.S. Fish Commission started stocking carp in the late 1800's, entire ecosystems were changed by the way carp feed.  They completely change the epibenthic layer, muddy the water and affect everything living above.  The changes were so dramatic that you didn't need to be a fisheries expert or even a casual fisherman to notice it.  There was a public outcry and the government carp stocking program soon shifted to a government carp eradication program.  Fisheries people were trying to figure out how to get rid of the things, but it was already too late. 

 

So, to evaluate the impact of carp you need to compare sportfish populations from pre-1877 to sportfish populations post-1900.  Water quality degradation in the later half of the 1900's is a different issue.

 

The bulk of changes caused to ecosystems has since been directly linked to humans and pollution due to industry and sewage releases.

 

To evaluate the effects and results of pollution you need to compare the sport fish populations prior to the ever increasing heavy industries pre 1877 vs late 20th century.

 

A lot of what you said was previously thought of as fact until people actually stopped pointing their fingers and actually looked at what was reality.

 

Entire ecosystems were destroyed in many water ways were destroyed by heavy industry. It just so happened that carp were one of the few hardy enough fish that could survive those water ways.

 

 

For a prime example of how little carp matter all you have to do is look at the rivers in and around Pittsburgh. Since heavy industries were shut down in the later half of the 20th century the sport fish populations have bounced back with the vengeance in spite of the large numbers of carp in Pittsburgh rivers. Smb, walleye, trout, musky, flatheads, etc... have all returned and there are still vast numbers of carp. Why?

 

 

Edited by Beastly Backlash
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/27/2021 at 9:42 AM, Captain Ahab said:

Spot on

 

If anything carp fry will provide good forage for game fish.

 

Absolutely. 

 

Carp eggs, fry, fingerlings, and all the way up to small adults become prey for predators of all age ranges and sizes.

 

What better way to sustain large numbers of predators both large and small then to provide them with a large forage base that exploits a food source other fish do not.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/26/2021 at 11:25 PM, Carpniels said:

From what I have read, this is not entirely true. Americans think this is true, but it's false science. In the 60s, 70s, and 80s, the water quality went down. SMB, LMB, walleye and perch populations went down due to the water quality going down. Hardy fish like carp were not impacted as much by the declining water quality, so their population remained about the same. So same number of carp, lower numbers of 'game' fish, and the carp get blamed. However, A did not cause B; A and B were caused by C. It wasn't a causal relationship.

 

Bluegill eat more game fish eggs than any other species. And they're native....

 

Carpniels

 

You obviously did your research rather then simply buy into an old wife's tale.:th:

Edited by Beastly Backlash
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I will point out that carp were stocked in US water ways to function as a food fish because the fish and water way ecosystems were already depleted and destroyed.

 

How does it make any logical sense to blame carp on the destruction of ecosystems when those ecosystems were already laid to waste prompting the idea of stocking carp to begin with?

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Beastly,

 

You're right on with what happened in Pburg; those facts appear to show that carp do not negatively impact game fish populations, the deteriorating and later improving water quality caused most of the changes in game fish populations, not the presence of carp.

 

The earliest info I was able to find was about carp being grown in ponds or raceways connected to Cayuga Lake (one of the fingerlakes). I read that the dammed off an arm of one of the creeks that fed into Cayuga Lake near Ithaca on the south side of the lake and used mesh or screen to keep the carp in while allowing water flow through the screen to refresh the carp pond water.  Imported in the 1830s, carp were grown there and supplied to the growing NYC population by rail car and they were sold as 'poor man's trout.' At one point, there was a flood or storm or another disaster that broke the dam/screen and the carp escaped. The rest is history....

 

Thanks - Carpniels

 

P.S. Yes, I did my research; I have a BA in animal husbandry with a MSc in fish nutrition. I love everything there is to know about fish (growing them as well as catching them). I tend to remember the things I'm most interested in the best.

Fisherman with 4 sons. I hope they all catch the 'bug' so I have a good excuse to leave the house and go fishing.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×
×
  • Create New...