Richard_the_Aughth

Does anyone really eat dogfish?

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If anyone does, please tell me, how do you prepare them? The best way I can think of without ever having tried, is to gut them, then skin them the way you would skin an eel, then cut them into steaks. As for cooking, I plan to just fry them as I would fish and chips. Hopefully I get a decent sized dogfish this summer(which seems very likely based on past experiences) and I can try it this year.

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I HAVE BEEN TOLD THAT MOST DOG FISH GO TO THE

UNITED KINGDOM TO BE USED IN THEIR FISH AND CHIPS.

 

IS THIS FAKE NEWS?

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There was a show on food network that showed someone targeting dog fish and cooking them to show that it wasn't a trash fish. I haven't tried myself yet but i would think maybe shark fin soup or maybe small steaks?

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I wish people would eat them, there are plenty to go around. Had a few trips with the kids last year in RI that the ocean seemed paved with them.

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So according to some googling

 

"The trick is to kill them, bleed them and ice them right away. This is essential because they have a "simple" digestive system that discharges urea through their skin. If you don't bleed them and put them on ice right away the meat will spoil (that's why they smell so bad when you cut them open)."

 

 

Much less accessible than I thought unless you are carrying a cooler full of ice with you.

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I have had dogfish served in a restaurant as part of an effort to promote it as an option, I would say that properly prepared it is very edible as is monkfish, another under used species.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

More than you ever wanted to read about spiny dogfish

 

I organized a spiny dogfish workshop way back in 2008. Had a bunch of industry people, managers and scientists talk about what was a serious glut of them - and their impact on other, far more valuable (economically and recreationally) fisheries. Because of pressure on NOAA/NMFS from ENGOs (this was back when Jane Lubchenco ran the agency), actual and implied Magnuson restrictions on harvesting-particularly that fisheries must be managed for MSY-the quota "had to" be kept at ridiculously low levels. 

 

The proceedings of the workshop and a whole bunch of stuff is linked at http://www.fishnet-usa.com/dogforum1.htm. Back then I don't think there was a manager, fisherman or legitimately objective researcher who didn't think there were way to many spiny dogs off the mid-Atlantic/New England coast. Their hands were tied.

 

It's a great example of how not to manage a fishery (or actually a bunch of related fisheries), and how our management process has been compromised by feckless bureaucrats, spineless pols, and effective lobbying-certainly not by any recreational or commercial fishing groups.

 

ps - Monkfish haven't been underutilized for decades in the U.S. They used to be kept as shack in several fisheries but, thanks in large part to Julia Childs (she featured monkfish on one of her shows), a significant directed fishery-gillnet and otter trawl-has developed. They have "always" been popular in Europe and Asia.

Edited by Nils S
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I have not cooked them myself, but my parents do. They make a soup from them. As stated previously you need to bleed and ice right away otherwise the meat goes bad. Once cleaned and meat cut up they then marinade and make different stews and soups from it. 

 

I tried grilling once, very tough meat. 

 

Fried looks like it would be a great option, have not tried that. 

 

I'm not overly crazy about dogfish, but my parents enjoy them. A lot of work though. 

 

My parents are from a small fishing village/island in Italy before coming to America in the 60s. So they grew up living and relying on the ocean, nothing went or goes to waste. 

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I don't like it but my family loves it (Italian). My grandma makes a dish with lightly breaded cuts sauteed with onions and olives

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Back in the early 90s I worked on Nantucket each summer for a major utility.After work we would drive out to Great Point to fish,a few pops,and a cook out.We started to catch a few big fluke on bucktails.So,I contacted Lee at Riverview B&T and he would send shipments of fresh sandeels and eels over on the plane a couple times a week.A couple of us commercial fished for bass at night with the eels.Anyway, we started catching lots of big fluke right at the rip.The sandeels outfished everything else.When the sun got low and hit the water the fluking died off and the dogfish moved in like clock work.One of the guys kept using the sandeel rigs to catch the doggies for fun.After awhile an ol timer came over and asked if we ever ate them.We said no and just released them.So we were cooking fresh fluke in cast iron skillets for supper.He said bring one in and I'll show you how to prepare one.He started sharpening a knife to a razor edge.Brought a doggie to the cutting board.He held the head down and filleted the doggie alive without touching the gut at all.Skinned the fillet and put in a slurry of saltwater and ice right away.Tossed the live doggie back in the rip[gruesome] and the other dogfish went crazy feeding.He took the fillet out of the slurry pat dried and we just used bread crumbs and cornmeal.Into the skillet with canola oil.Both the fluke and doggie fried up.The dogfich was like a stringier codfish taste and flaked off.We handed it out to people and they thought they were eating the fluke and cod.It was very good.The ol timer said don't touch the gut at all.That was his trick.

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5 hours ago, Sandeel95 said:

I HAVE BEEN TOLD THAT MOST DOG FISH GO TO THE

UNITED KINGDOM TO BE USED IN THEIR FISH AND CHIPS.

 

IS THIS FAKE NEWS?

It is but it isn't - the time  we go to the UK and try fish and chips, the numberss of species of fish to choose from is pretty extensive. Its not like here, where it's either cod or haddock (although those are two of the many choices you can choose)...Dogfish is another one on the menu though...some of the list reads like what you'd see in the FL keys, and in other cases, there were a number of fish from Europe and Asia

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4 hours ago, Nils S said:

More than you ever wanted to read about spiny dogfish

 

I organized a spiny dogfish workshop way back in 2008. Had a bunch of industry people, managers and scientists talk about what was a serious glut of them - and their impact on other, far more valuable (economically and recreationally) fisheries. Because of pressure on NOAA/NMFS from ENGOs (this was back when Jane Lubchenco ran the agency), actual and implied Magnuson restrictions on harvesting-particularly that fisheries must be managed for MSY-the quota "had to" be kept at ridiculously low levels. 

 

The proceedings of the workshop and a whole bunch of stuff is linked at http://www.fishnet-usa.com/dogforum1.htm. Back then I don't think there was a manager, fisherman or legitimately objective researcher who didn't think there were way to many spiny dogs off the mid-Atlantic/New England coast. Their hands were tied.

 

It's a great example of how not to manage a fishery (or actually a bunch of related fisheries), and how our management process has been compromised by feckless bureaucrats, spineless pols, and effective lobbying-certainly not by any recreational or commercial fishing groups.

 

ps - Monkfish haven't been underutilized for decades in the U.S. They used to be kept as shack in several fisheries but, thanks in large part to Julia Childs (she featured monkfish on one of her shows), a significant directed fishery-gillnet and otter trawl-has developed. They have "always" been popular in Europe and Asia.

 

Funny how those "experts" talk about the impact of dogfish on other species while ignoring the impact of unsustainable commercial fishing practices.

 

Did they ask themselves why there is such a "glut" of dogfish?

 

Lack of predators comes to my mind.

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5 hours ago, Sandeel95 said:

I HAVE BEEN TOLD THAT MOST DOG FISH GO TO THE

UNITED KINGDOM TO BE USED IN THEIR FISH AND CHIPS.

 

IS THIS FAKE NEWS?

Yep, they go to Germany for their fish 'n chips.

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