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Capt.Castafly

Old and Vintage Fly Tying Tool and Equipment

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How many old timers are here (on this board) with incredible knowledge from decades past.

It might be nice to post some old gear for some of the younger guys to know and see the transition and progress fly tying is made.

So feel free to post old fly rods, reels, fly tying materials, and tying gear for all to see.

 

A blast from the past. I opened up the vault today for some oldies but goodies!

 

Picture 1   Knoll beginner vise that was included with the kit of materials and a few tools.

Picture 2   Original Chase Bobbin Holder made in Boston around 1960's. It still has the old wooded spool loaded with wax thread.

Tying was difficult before the invention of the bobbin holder. It was a pain holding  and wrapping just the thread, than placing a weight like hackle plier on it to hold it at rest.

Picture 3   Herter's Bodkin Tools. One end has magnetized tip, the other a wire look to push away hackles tying off heads on dry flies.

Picture 4   Herter's Catalog, circa 1969. Herter's was the largest distributor in the land selling fly fishing/fly tying and any thing else outdoors.

Hope you old timers enjoy these photos. 

If you have any older tools, equipment, we like to see pictures.

IMG_2479.JPG

IMG_2480.JPG

IMG_2483.JPG

IMG_2485.JPG

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Same here, along with an old DH Thompson Model B vise that's still impossible to beat for tying bucktail on smaller jigs

 

 

DH Thompson model B vise.jpg

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6 hours ago, Sudsy said:

Same here, along with an old DH Thompson Model B vise that's still impossible to beat for tying bucktail on smaller jigs

 

 

DH Thompson model B vise.jpg

That's kinda like like the one I had but with a straight head and flat jaws . It was still a vast improvement over the Knoll vise.

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The S&M bobbins. I like the weight. I use these for all of my large stuff and any spinning of hair heads. 

For the trout stuff I go in the opposite direction and use renzetti midge bobbins. 

 

1BB6FF69-EF89-4777-9178-471060FC5702.jpeg

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For the "not as young" fly tiers, not old equipment but old tinsel worth its weight in gold or silver as the case may be. I got these in the 80's from a fly tier who began tying in the 40's but had to stop in the 60's because of serious sight problems (he eventually became blind). But he held on to his equipment and material in the hope of eventually solving his sight problem and being able to resume his tying. And finally, he was then in his 80's, he resigned himself  to give away everything, equipment (vise,bobbins etc) and materials (which were mostly to tie wet flies), and I was the chosen recipient through a friend of his.

 

20210225_112207.jpg.00666fa3210aa91c2a8b722892c48878.jpg20210225_112022.jpg.1a6b1837ea56a3d9f14485cc96bfba79.jpg

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18 hours ago, Capt.Castafly said:

How many old timers are here (on this board) with incredible knowledge from decades past.

It might be nice to post some old gear for some of the younger guys to know and see the transition and progress fly tying is made.

So feel free to post old fly rods, reels, fly tying materials, and tying gear for all to see.

 

A blast from the past. I opened up the vault today for some oldies but goodies!

 

Picture 1   Knoll beginner vise that was included with the kit of materials and a few tools.

Picture 2   Original Chase Bobbin Holder made in Boston around 1960's. It still has the old wooded spool loaded with wax thread.

Tying was difficult before the invention of the bobbin holder. It was a pain holding  and wrapping just the thread, than placing a weight like hackle plier on it to hold it at rest.

Picture 3   Herter's Bodkin Tools. One end has magnetized tip, the other a wire look to push away hackles tying off heads on dry flies.

Picture 4   Herter's Catalog, circa 1969. Herter's was the largest distributor in the land selling fly fishing/fly tying and any thing else outdoors.

Hope you old timers enjoy these photos. 

If you have any older tools, equipment, we like to see pictures.

IMG_2479.JPG

IMG_2480.JPG

IMG_2483.JPG

IMG_2485.JPG

That Herter's catalog sure brings back memories...

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5 hours ago, Kml said:

The S&M bobbins. I like the weight. I use these for all of my large stuff and any spinning of hair heads. 

For the trout stuff I go in the opposite direction and use renzetti midge bobbins. 

 

1BB6FF69-EF89-4777-9178-471060FC5702.jpeg

I still have one on my bench that I use to wrap lead with.

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6 hours ago, Suave said:

For the "not as young" fly tiers, not old equipment but old tinsel worth its weight in gold or silver as the case may be. I got these in the 80's from a fly tier who began tying in the 40's but had to stop in the 60's because of serious sight problems (he eventually became blind). But he held on to his equipment and material in the hope of eventually solving his sight problem and being able to resume his tying. And finally, he was then in his 80's, he resigned himself  to give away everything, equipment (vise,bobbins etc) and materials (which were mostly to tie wet flies), and I was the chosen recipient through a friend of his.

 

20210225_112207.jpg.00666fa3210aa91c2a8b722892c48878.jpg20210225_112022.jpg.1a6b1837ea56a3d9f14485cc96bfba79.jpg

I got dibs! Nice stuff. 

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7 hours ago, Suave said:

For the "not as young" fly tiers, not old equipment but old tinsel worth its weight in gold or silver as the case may be. I got these in the 80's from a fly tier who began tying in the 40's but had to stop in the 60's because of serious sight problems (he eventually became blind). But he held on to his equipment and material in the hope of eventually solving his sight problem and being able to resume his tying. And finally, he was then in his 80's, he resigned himself  to give away everything, equipment (vise,bobbins etc) and materials (which were mostly to tie wet flies), and I was the chosen recipient through a friend of his.

 

20210225_112207.jpg.00666fa3210aa91c2a8b722892c48878.jpg20210225_112022.jpg.1a6b1837ea56a3d9f14485cc96bfba79.jpg

Remarkably good condition 

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History!

Universal Vise Co was a major player back in the 50's in fly tying.

Every sporting shop (if they had a fishing dept. ) would have a turn table rack of fly fishing materials with their carded products on them.

I could never find a complete neck. You bought dry fly hackles in a package of twenty-five.

Notice the price of materials? Everything was almost a dime. Heck! you pay more in sales tax now than the cost of the product back than.

Few would ever dub. If they did it was a single strand of thread, waxed and twisted. Don't remember ever seeing a twisting loop for double noodles. That why most patterns used wool for bodies. You just pricked it out to give it a more buggy look.

 

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IMG_2481.JPG

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On ‎2‎/‎24‎/‎2021 at 10:07 PM, Sudsy said:

Same here, along with an old DH Thompson Model B vise that's still impossible to beat for tying bucktail on smaller jigs

 

 

DH Thompson model B vise.jpg

Almost all the vises jaws back than used collet jaws. It would pull the collet into a tapered hole to tighten around the hook.

They probably got the idea from metal lathes which would grab round bar stock. Each collect was activated by pulling from the other end. At first a large knob was used. Later Thompson developed a cam to make it  quicker. Using collets are tough. It required a complete set in metal working to suit various diameter changes. There was much free play. Later as we all know the hook jaws were activated by a cam/lever system right at the jaws to facilitate the rotary action of the newer vises. Collets are frequently used on drill heads and, Dremel  Tools.

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10 hours ago, Kml said:

Remarkably good condition 

Actually all of it is still in top condition. The picture doesn't do it justice due to my poor choice of background color.

 

As written on the spools in the first picture, it purports to be "The world's only genuine tarnish proof pure metal" (and I think it is) and this made-in-France tinsel (or I should say "fly tying lamettas" (wow!)) was distributed in North America by Herter's. I'm curious to know if it was listed in that 1969 Herter's catalog pictured above.

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10 mins ago, Suave said:

I'm curious to know if it was listed in that 1969 Herter's catalog pictured above.

I'll try to check on if it's listed in the Herter's Catalog when I gets some time.

I already filed the catalog away back in storage.

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