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Skagit vs Scandi

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The articles I've read about Skagit and Scandi lines all make the point that Scandi lines are better suited for smaller, lighter flies, and that Skagit lines are better for heavier flies and faster sink tips. My question is, where is the dividing line? At what point is a fly too heavy for a Scandi line? Are Scandi lines appropriate for flies with small dumbbell eyes? What about unweighted flies that are 4-6" long? Or are there other, better, reasons to pick one over the other?

 

I've been using Skagit lines for great lakes steelhead. The streams I fish do not require hero casts. I'm fishing medium-size intruder-type flies, some of which are lightly weighted and small tube flies. I'm wondering if a Scandi line might be a better choice for me. But maybe there's no downside to continuing with a Skagit line.

 

This is all theoretical for me since I've had to cancel my last couple of steelhead trips due to covid. I'm hoping to get out next month and am considering picking up a new Scandi line to try.

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It is an artificial divide and limited only by your abilities and the specific parameters of each individual line’s design profile..  The Scandinavians themselves routinely fish heavily weighted brass tubes on so-called “scandi” lines.  It is just easier with blunt heavy “skagit” lines.  

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Skagit is for people who can't spey cast.  I fish skagit...:rav:  Actually, most of my two- hander fishing invloves streamers and sink tips- skagit works better.  I want a scandi lines for skating dries and swinging small wets.

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1 hour ago, titleguy said:

Skagit is for people who can't spey cast.  I fish skagit...:rav:  Actually, most of my two- hander fishing invloves streamers and sink tips- skagit works better.  I want a scandi lines for skating dries and swinging small wets.

I still throw an old school fully integrated Delta spey for skating dries and small wet flies...You're right, skagit is for people who can't spey cast lol!

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Scandi lines and scandi heads can throw larger flies (e.g., size 1 or 1/0 size flies, lightly dressed 2/0 flies, medium to large flatwings, baitfish imitations, gummies, crease flies, etc...) provided that the line weight itself is heavy.  An 8/9 or 9/10 scandi line -- for example a Sci. Anglers UST scandi 8/9 or 9/10 head and polyleaders or tips up to around another 80-100g will throw rather large flies.  Anything larger than ~2/0, anything heavily weighted, and/or really wind resistant, I prefer Skagit plus tips.  Distance is of course sacrificed with short skagit heads and heavy tips.

Edited by Killiefish

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I fished with my glass trout spey yesterday.  I have a 200 gr OPST integrated with the 76 grain tips.  24-30" of 1x fluoro and a small intruder with medium beadchain eyes casts beautifully.  I can sort of spey cast.  I am going to branch out on the trout speys and my 7 wt Meiser this summer and try some scandi lines for different applications.  I bought a bunch of used heads on ebay last year and will be messing about with them.

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This two handed thing is the most confusing thing that I’ve ever seen in fishing. Scandi, skagit, tips, etc. 

 

I ordered a trout Spey rod and rio set of lines. I’m guessing by the time that this I done my wallet will be a good bit lighter. 

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1 hour ago, Drew C. said:

This two handed thing is the most confusing thing that I’ve ever seen in fishing. Scandi, skagit, tips, etc. 

 

I ordered a trout Spey rod and rio set of lines. I’m guessing by the time that this I done my wallet will be a good bit lighter. 

New lexicon...  If you are  pirmarily swinging streamers deeper in the water column, an OPST integrated line and their 80 grain tips will cover most of your applications.  When you go down the rabbit hole, however...

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Trying out different lines with different tips is the only way to get a feel for what works for you. We all start at the same place - confused. The basics of skagit and scandi, as others have said, is a good place to start. The one thing you want to develop is the "feel" of that fat head in the air loading the rod. Once that mind-body connection is made all the confusion starts to go away and you will begin to understand what works and what doesn't.

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28 mins ago, flyphoto said:

Trying out different lines with different tips is the only way to get a feel for what works for you. We all start at the same place - confused. The basics of skagit and scandi, as others have said, is a good place to start. The one thing you want to develop is the "feel" of that fat head in the air loading the rod. Once that mind-body connection is made all the confusion starts to go away and you will begin to understand what works and what doesn't.

Just to say that the salmon fly in your avatar is gorgeous. One of your ties? 

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50 mins ago, ZAFisher said:

I want to kick this man in the shins.

 

 

Why would you want to do that? :howdy:   I agree that he's not really showing you the difference between Scandi and Skagit.  He's showing how one can cast a longer scandi floater and a shorter sinking head (e.g. a multi density head) with tips with underhanded style casting.  So, it doesn't really answer the question, except to say that you can adapt Scandi (underhand) methods and not change your casting stroke much.  I find it useful because where I live one can essentially get away with underhand casting all day long.  His method works and is also very efficient.  Unless you mean you want to kick him because he makes it look so damn easy???

 

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