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Québec Brookie Flies

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Suave

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Very nice work.

In my younger days, I loved to fish streamers in the spring for trout when the water flow, and streams were swollen.

Back than I had a lot of wet flies too. You don't see many wet flies anymore being tied and used?

It's nymphs and beaded flies. Streamers too have taken a back seat.

Nothing flies by me without a hook!
If my fly is down, That's a good thing.

Public Access.....It's a shore thing. My daily requirement of "Vitamin Sea".


Capt. Ray Stachelek

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  • 11 months later...
On 2021-01-28 at 5:41 PM, Capt.Castafly said:

Very nice work.

In my younger days, I loved to fish streamers in the spring for trout when the water flow, and streams were swollen.

Back than I had a lot of wet flies too. You don't see many wet flies anymore being tied and used?

It's nymphs and beaded flies. Streamers too have taken a back seat.

Sorry Capt. Ray but better late than never: thank you.

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Two more flies for brook trout originated in Québec.

 

The André A.

20220125_121852.jpg.4137a933f24c9c9268d9c8abcc4deed0.jpg

 

This fly was originated by a Québec fly tier in honor of a well known Québec outdoors writer, André A. Bellemarre, and in a short time became very popular with fly anglers not only for brookies but for rainbows and browns as well.

 

The Pinard

20200423_074852.jpg.317a339d3799e1521b7245a18968f4d6.jpg

I've written here about this one a couple of times before. Originated jointly  by two friends of mine, a very good  fly angler (the fly  bears his name) who had observed schools of a small baitfish on which the big browns and rainbows of the Saint-Lawrence fed where he fished and a Montréal fly tier with whom he sat down to develop this fly.  The original has no orange throat. And my friend did very well with it not only on those rainbows and browns but on the smallies of the Saint-Lawrence as well. And It also has success on salmon streams.

 

And when I resumed fishing brookies in lakes about fifteen years ago, I tried the original, did quite well with it and then decided to add that orange bucktail throat and it became by far my best fly for brookies.     

Edited by Suave
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19 hours ago, Suave said:

Two more flies for brook trout originated in Québec.

 

The André A.

20220125_121852.jpg.4137a933f24c9c9268d9c8abcc4deed0.jpg

 

This fly was originated by a Québec fly tier in honor of a well known Québec outdoors writer, André A. Bellemarre, and in a short time became very popular with fly anglers not only for brookies but for rainbows and browns as well.

 

The Pinard

20200423_074852.jpg.317a339d3799e1521b7245a18968f4d6.jpg

I've written here about this one a couple of times before. Originated jointly  by two friends of mine, a very good  fly angler (the fly  bears his name) who had observed schools of a small baitfish on which the big browns and rainbows of the Saint-Lawrence fed where he fished and a Montréal fly tier with whom he sat down to develop this fly.  The original has no orange throat. And my friend did very well with it not only on those rainbows and browns but on the smallies of the Saint-Lawrence as well. And It also has success on salmon streams.

 

And when I resumed fishing brookies in lakes about fifteen years ago, I tried the original, did quite well with it and then decided to add that orange bucktail throat and it became by far my best fly for brookies.     

ORANGE !!! baby!!!! Boy,Ilike this one[actually both].I'm going to tie up a mess of those.Thanks Pierre........:ginzo:

Edited by theshadow
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Three more, two streamers and one that can be fished both as a streamer or as... a dry fly. As you no doubt deduced, I'm very partial to streamers in my brook trout fishing. I'll tell you why in my next post.

 

Ventre Rouge du Nord

20220127_102211.jpg.2e6c82a04a6d28d093c091d325c2f8e0.jpg

 

I've posted this one before. I discovered it about five years ago on a Québec fly fishing and fly tying site. It purports to imitate the Northern Red-bellied Dace, a small baitfish found in most Laurentian where I did most of my brook trout fishing. I fished it with a lot of success (on par with the Pinard) on my two or three annual trips before Covid.

 

Galarneau

20220129_100019.jpg.7d1a6b0566b086c14e8fecf55fe878ce.jpg

 

A variant of Frank Hornberg's most successful fly that  has been around for close to 100 years. It can be fished both as a streamer and as a dry fly (you can do both on the same cast).

 

Neptune streamer

20220127_100417.jpg.d2b65d330cdedc315c90397914c1506f.jpg

 

Neptune is an important producer and distributor of flies in Québec. This is one of their originals that has become very popular among Québec fly anglers.   

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On 2021-01-28 at 5:41 PM, Capt.Castafly said:


Streamers too have taken a back seat.

Well they never have for me. But my trout fishing has been almost only for brook trout and in lakes at that.

 

And when I began fly fishing in 1960 it was of course (being in Québec) for brookies and it came as the result of a combination of factors: my family had access to leased waters in the Laurentians that included two mountain top brook trout lakes, I was still a student so I could spend every weekend fishing, (which I did for that and the following two summers), my father (who was an  angler and hunter) had died earlier that year leaving me (as the only son) all his fishing and hunting gearin which I found a few bamboo fly rods, including a lovely 8' 6w Hardy rod. So that summer, I began on my own experimenting with that fly rod with the help  mostly of whatever I could read on fly casting and fly fishing for brookies.

 

And, in those years, fly fishing for brookies up here meant fishing basically with wet flies and... with a cast of three flies (so Steve Culton would have been in good company at that time!). I tried that but with my less than stellar casting made a mess of it and decide to go down to two flies. And a short while later I discovered streamers (my Dad had only wet flies) and in no time I was fishing most of the time with a streamer on point and a wet fly on the dropper using a 7 1/2' leader and a floating fly line. Later on I discovered nymphs so it became either a nymph or a wet fly on the dropper but always with a streamer on point. And I had success with this throughout the summer. But of course if there was surface activity, more so if there was a hatch that I could identify and match, I would then use other methods like putting two nymphs on or a longer leader with a dry fly. But those were rare occurrences.

 

So when, fifteen years ago, I came back to fishing for brook trout, again in lakes but this time only in the spring (one trip a summer), it was natural for me to use the same method with a cast of two flies. Although, as I was fishing new lakes, I added a second rod with a full sinking line and  a short 4' leader to which I tied one streamer and that I used to "prospect" these new lakes as follows: "trolling" that streamer mainly not far from the shoreline until I got a hit, then passing once again over the same spot and stopping there if I got a second hit and then switching to the floating line with the two flies to thoroughly search the area by casting. This was a very successful method for me! But, of course, it remains to be seen if it would be as successful later on in the summer...

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Writing about my early fishing for brookies made me reflect back to the flies I was using then and that I haven't used since. All store bought as I came to fly tying only in the late 70's. Those of you of my generation will no doubt remember that the wet flies you bought then generally came with  a piece (5-6" long) of leaderwit a loop already attached to the fly! 

 

So for old times' sake and for fun, I decided to tie some and show them here although they did not originate in Québec.  Three streamers to start with.

 

Silver Doctor

20220125_122952.jpg.4a797024284aedf8fc2ae65337eb0150.jpg

 

Dark Montreal

20220129_093359.jpg.77768098b2929c86f32b2c4d8d9dc5be.jpg

 

Royal Coachman

20220129_093505.jpg.6e5340eb6af51863b52cab658dc2ee3d.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

Edited by Suave
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Two more streamers. The Parmachene Belle was definitely among my early favorite flies but the Mickey Finn came quite a few years later, albeit as a hairwing and never became one of my favorites. But it's fun to play around with married wings and the Mickey Finn is very popular up here.

 

Parmachene Belle

20220129_093650.jpg.4f2a28f00e14fcbc153bc425d8234a68.jpg

 

Mickey Finn

20220129_101431.jpg.b0f89d1c7c955f91c67903b14d2119c9.jpg 

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And of course I fished Muddler Minnows in those early years. But one of its variants soon became one of my favorite flies for brookies. In the mid sixties, probably through an article or an ad in a fishing and hunting magazine, I discovered the legendary Dan Bailey Fly Shop, had them send me a catalog and began ordering flies (and subsequently fly tying materials when I went into fly tying in the late seventies). Among these, the series of Marabou Muddlers (the yellow one became my best all-time fly for smallmouths) and this Muddler variant popularized by Bailey and so wonderfully named the Missoulian Spook. And this western fly worked very well on eastern brookies.

 

Missoulian Spook

 

20220205_093948.jpg.717378b64eaf4a454f92587a5889cf8f.jpg

Edited by Suave
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