DeepBlue85

Sanding

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Quick question, been applying spray primer to epoxy sealed plugs for years and realise how critical a smoothe surface influences the clean application of primer making for a better painted finish.  Sanding that epoxied surface is probably my least favorite part of the process and gets done by hand...outside.  

 

My question is about wet sanding, would wet sanding with some kind of alcohol be a good way to cut down on the resulting dust without affecting adhesion or trapping moisture in the surface? 

 

Additionally I'd like to comment that I prefer flooding the wood's surface during the sealing process with a thicker resulting 'shell'.  I'm aware others prefer a wiped clean finish prior to sanding, but are there benefits to either approach? 

Edited by DeepBlue85

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Now much epoxy ya putting on for sealing ? Should be hardly any excess to sand other then maybe a drip on bottom when hung to dry .. I heat plug to 325 , warm epoxy to thin , smear all over inside and out , wipe excess and send bbq skewer through the through hole to clear excess . When it’s dry most has soaked in , then I just lightly scuff with 220 and paint away 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Same process for me, but I try to keep a built up layer of epoxy by turning an flipping to keep even thickness around the body, just enough to hide the grain of the wood I'd say.  After that I sand with 120 an 220 but iv been curious about wet sanding with rubbing alcohol to keep dust down.  

Edited by DeepBlue85

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Once the epoxy is soaked in ya can’t get much more sealed IMO , its like having an epoxy impregnated blank.  . And your putting two more coats on after paint  . I go with the less is more approach personally . Even on finish coats , two coats as thin as possible 

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13 mins ago, Wire For Fire said:

Once the epoxy is soaked in ya can’t get much more sealed IMO , its like having an epoxy impregnated blank.  . And your putting two more coats on after paint  . I go with the less is more approach personally . Even on finish coats , two coats as thin as possible 

 

 

Yeah for sure, i have found that a thicker seal coat does a better job at lengthening the life of the plug against teeth an gouging and some of the ceders an other lighter woods i use need that hardening component. ..really the only reason I do that.   Iv even been floating the idea of adding thin glass lay-ups not unlike the shaping of a surf board, balsa boards to be specific.  

Edited by DeepBlue85

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Have you ever tried wet sanding your seal coat vs dry? I have quite a bit of sanding to do but cant be doing that anywhere inside because of the dust.

Edited by DeepBlue85

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I wipe plug clean once epoxy stops soaking in. I light sand epoxy a couple days later.  I do not try for a glass finish before primer. Seems way overboard to me. I don’t mind seeing some grain in the wood. I’m building fishing plugs. If I was going for pristine art projects I I would only get 10 plugs done a winter. That’s me. I love seeing the artistic plugs but It’s just not what I try for. I know my limitations. I also think if you make plugs too beautiful they will never get fished. I want my plugs ruined from actual fishing. Again this is my philosophy.  To each his own. 

Edited by Steel Pulse

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Yup ^ i stopped even priming 90% of the time . The air brush paint sticks great to scuffed epoxy . I knock down all the shine spots and maybe the odd drip in the tail but I try and wipe them clean as they drying .  And that’s it maybe I like a min tops sanding 

Edited by Wire For Fire

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FWIW, because the plugs have few to no flat surfaces, for sanding/scuffing I've found that fine steel wool does a much better/faster job with much less dust creation.

Edited by H'Islander

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I am in line with WFF and SP.  hell I am still using rattle cans so I am not too finicky with the finish.  Day time plugs maybe a little bit more than nighttime. However, when they do turn out clean, it is nice!  I get the point of your question...

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