coastalfreak

The most rugged spinning reels ever made.

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Saturday, I was fishing near a small bayou here in Louisiana when I sunk down into marsh mud. I ended up using my cheap Jawbone spinning rod (like 14 bucks at Dicks) to get me out. I had to anchor it into the soil and pull myself out.
 

The more I live here in Louisiana, the more I realize what conditions I may get into to fish. I’m a big fan of fishing marshes and swamps. The habitat they provide is simply incredible. Problem is, I don’t have a boat so I’m going to have to get really kinda waste deep in these places to fish. 
 

As I’m primarily a bait and wait guy, rods don’t necessarily present a problem to me. I can roll with an Ugly Stik or other fiberglass rod and not have many issues. The problem I’m growing more and more worried about mainly comes down to reels. 
 

I feel like my reels, in the near future, will be exposed to extreme amounts of mud, sand, and other grime. I just simply don’t feel confident taking Daiwas and Shimanos out in those conditions. I was once fishing the Georgia Marsh from the bank when I fell and my Shimano got some mud on it. It wasn’t a lot, and it started to get kinda sketchy quickly. I also should note I love these reels, and I love fishing them in calm conditions but when I look at the durability (or lack thereof) in very harsh conditions, and complexity of the reel I get nervous. 
 

What are the most rugged spinning reels you can think of!l? Refinement is not something that I care too much about, because again, most of the time my rod is in a spike. I just want to have some reels in the back of my mind that I can purchase and abuse greatly, but they can still work despite the elements. Obviously there are things like Van Staals and the SaltX, but those are very expensive. I’m thinking of a Penn Z or old school BG type reel to fit the Bill. Any thoughts? 
 

For size, I’d probably go in the 710 range for an all around. 
 

 

Edited by coastalfreak

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Yes doesn’t get any simpler or reliable then the Penn Z’s, (within reason) they are the AK 47 of the reel world!

Edited by Dave T.

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Yes, I agree that you’ve already come up with your own answer.

Penn spin fisher series reels and Older Daiwa Black Gold reels are tough as nails and easy to repair yourself.

Considering the type of fishing you’re describing, I think that being able to repair your reels quickly and easily should be a major factor in helping you make your decision.

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Brand doesn't matter as much as the model.  Any of shimano's sealed reels could handle those conditions easily. I would personally get a shimano spheros or penn spinfisher VI  for budget reels that can handle the elements a bit.

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1 hour ago, coastalfreak said:

Saturday, I was fishing near a small bayou here in Louisiana when I sunk down into marsh mud. I ended up using my cheap Jawbone spinning rod (like 14 bucks at Dicks) to get me out. I had to anchor it into the soil and pull myself out.
 

The more I live here in Louisiana, the more I realize what conditions I may get into to fish. I’m a big fan of fishing marshes and swamps. The habitat they provide is simply incredible. Problem is, I don’t have a boat so I’m going to have to get really kinda waste deep in these places to fish. 
 

As I’m primarily a bait and wait guy, rods don’t necessarily present a problem to me. I can roll with an Ugly Stik or other fiberglass rod and not have many issues. The problem I’m growing more and more worried about mainly comes down to reels. 
 

I feel like my reels, in the near future, will be exposed to extreme amounts of mud, sand, and other grime. I just simply don’t feel confident taking Daiwas and Shimanos out in those conditions. I was once fishing the Georgia Marsh from the bank when I fell and my Shimano got some mud on it. It wasn’t a lot, and it started to get kinda sketchy quickly. I also should note I love these reels, and I love fishing them in calm conditions but when I look at the durability (or lack thereof) in very harsh conditions, and complexity of the reel I get nervous. 
 

What are the most rugged spinning reels you can think of!l? Refinement is not something that I care too much about, because again, most of the time my rod is in a spike. I just want to have some reels in the back of my mind that I can purchase and abuse greatly, but they can still work despite the elements. Obviously there are things like Van Staals and the SaltX, but those are very expensive. I’m thinking of a Penn Z or old school BG type reel to fit the Bill. Any thoughts? 
 

For size, I’d probably go in the 710 range for an all around. 
 

 

I love the 710 z reels.  You can buy them for around $40 so getting a few is a good idea and cheap.  Even if you get sand in them they just grind through it.  You’ll have less annoyances if you drill the rotor cup to let the mud and sand out.  Great reels, really cheap and super easy to work on.

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Put it this way.

 

I was born in 1954.  I have Penns (green, pre-Z Penns, although the Zs were largely similar) that I bought when I was in high school and college..

 

They still work.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I abandoned the notion of a sealed reel and embraced providing easy access for water to flow in and out of the crank case.  Old-school spinners are simpler and simple is better.  If grit or sand gets inside, just swish the reel around in the water to flush it out.  

 

I seldom use spinners, but greenie spinfishers have good corrosion resistance and require very little care.  Old Mitchells do not hold up as long but they are dirt cheap so you can have plenty of spares.

 

This is a Mitchell 304.

 

 

304D.jpg

304H.jpg

Edited by oc1

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19 mins ago, oc1 said:

I abandoned the notion of a sealed reel and embraced providing easy access for water to flow in and out of the crank case.  Old-school spinners are simpler and simple is better.  If grit or sand gets inside, just swish the reel around in the water to flush it out.  

 

I seldom use spinners, but greenie spinfishers have good corrosion resistance and require very little care.  Old Mitchells do not hold up as long but they are dirt cheap so you can have plenty of spares.

 

This is a Mitchell 304.

 

 

304D.jpg

304H.jpg

I love it! But I gotta ask, do you have any concerns about grease/oils getting into the water? Other than that, I think that’s a great idea honestly. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

6 hours ago, coastalfreak said:

The more I live here in Louisiana, the more I realize what conditions I may get into to fish. I’m a big fan of fishing marshes and swamps. The habitat they provide is simply incredible. Problem is, I don’t have a boat so I’m going to have to get really kinda waste deep in these places to fish.

Am I the only one who may see a potential "small" problem with this, above?

 

Aligator 02.jpg

Edited by Popasilov
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