DaleG603

What's everyone tying for this years saltwater!?

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86 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, xjclint said:

Usually less crimp than yak or ep. Thickness of yak. It ranges by brand a lot. Some are fine and straight. Some are pretty wavy. The photo I shared in this thread is my new favorite brand. Good volume but not too coarse. So cheap I make it work but there are better materials for certain flies (like ep). 

Thanks, I was blown away by the volume for the price.  Look forward to messing up as many high-tie slammer style flies as I want without the cheap scotsman in the back of my head getting frustrated.

 

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2 hours ago, Bait Tailer said:

Where would you guys say this wig hair fits in compared to other synthetic hairs? Is it a substitute for anything in particular? It seems to have some of the characteristics of EP and Yak hair, but I'm just getting into synthetics. 

I have a pack of Kankalon that seems to be identical to a brand-name artificial yak hair. From my limited experience, as xjclint wrote, each brand or package has different characteristics. For a couple of bucks you'll have enough fiber to tie more flies than you'll ever have time to fish.

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So, instead of having just too much of the same color fiber mentioned above, sold in 3 hank skeins. and wanting other colors, rather than keep purchasing 3 hanks of colors to get the color combo you like,  maybe we should list those we have and would want to trade for another color, put them in an envelope, regular postage, and swap and trade? Someone's got 3 pinks but would like a white plus a chartreuse, trade one for the other? Sounds good to me. 

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16 hours ago, flysully said:

So, instead of having just too much of the same color fiber mentioned above, sold in 3 hank skeins. and wanting other colors, rather than keep purchasing 3 hanks of colors to get the color combo you like,  maybe we should list those we have and would want to trade for another color, put them in an envelope, regular postage, and swap and trade? Someone's got 3 pinks but would like a white plus a chartreuse, trade one for the other? Sounds good to me. 

A few colors are 4 bucks for 3 packs and they are huge. Like the idea but economically it barely makes sense to swap on these. This is how much gray I got for 4 dollars. This is a size 11 slipper for reference. In person swap might be better if we were closer. 

image.jpg

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On 1/12/2021 at 1:11 AM, FlatWing said:

On the Back of any saddle, you will find the oldest feathers.  These are very wide (compared to the others).  On a Flatwing saddle they are both long and very wide. You want to avoid using a:Pro-Grade" saddle feather, as they have stiff stems throughout, so the oldest ones are especially stiff, and do not easily lend themselves to being bent around the small diameter of a hook shank.  Remember that with the "folding" technique, your are wrapping the stem in the front-to-back axis, as opposed to the side-to-side axis ,as is done with dry flies, so a stiff stem will fight you and likely crack, as opposed to bending,  With practice, you will learn what a suitable stem feels like.  But this is also the reason that I use a Maribou feather on a fly when I want a longer collar/wing - even the largest Maribou feathers are much easier to bend that the largest hackles in the area where the webs are the widest. I betting that i probably just committed a heresy in the Flatwing world :bucktooth: 

Chickens shed ALL their feathers once/yr,there are no older or younger feathers.

There are non-moulting breeds where the feathers continue to grow to lengths of sometimes over 10' over a period of 5 or more years but that's not what is sold to the feather trade as those birds could no be afforded by most ppl.Strictly collectors/show birds.

Todays "genetic" hackle are crosses of Yokohama, Sumatra (long feathered) and American and English game breeds w/ some domestic breeds such as Plymouth Rocks for producing the broad,webby saddle and necks used for most streamers.

I've been raising/breeding my own chickens/hackle for over 50 years...

red3.jpg

 

20210214_134608lukebike.jpg

Edited by slip n slide

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On 1/12/2021 at 7:54 AM, JCH said:

I'm tying a bunch of crustaceans for the spring.  Shrimp (mostly bonefish patterns) and crabs like this one:

 

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Find your self a clear water flat that is near a channel in Cape Cod Bay and visit at dead low tide  scout the flat is sand. Look for “GUZZLES” aka indent tiny channels during baby sand eels.  Your neat crab fly get you shots at Medium to large striped bass.  The Stripers start filtering in to the flats to ambush clouds of golden sand eels!

 

The flats beach usually has a channel at the edge  that is 5’ or more deep. The channels are the work of waves breaking the   Pick GUZZELS THAT FLOWS FROM THE DEEP CHANNEL TO THE  BEACH CHANNEL. WALK OUT TOWARD THE DEEP CHANNEL  PICK A SPOT THAT WILL BE 2.5 FEET AS THE TIDE MOVES UP ON THE FLAT.

 

WHEN YOU SEE A STRIPER COMING TO YOU TOSS YOUR CRAB 40 to 50 FEET FROM YOU AND LET IT SETTLE TO THE BOTTOM OF THE GUZZEL.  

 

WHEN THE FISH IS8 OR 9 FEET FROM YOUR FLY DO 1 STRIP THAT MOVES THE FLY THAT CAUSES A PUFF OF SAND. 
 

THAT 1 STRIP USUALLY CAUSES THE STRIPER TO ATTACK THE CRAB.  IT WILL HIT THE SITE OF THE PUFF AND INHALE THE CRAB INTO IT’s BELLY.  WHEN YOU SEE CLOUD. OFSAND AND THE BRIGHT RED GILL’S STRIP HARD.  
 

THE STRIPED BASS WILL BLOW  UP AND START JUMPING OUT OF THE WATER AND TRY TO GET TO THE DEEP CHANNEL!


STRIPERS HUNT FOR CRABS AND BABY FLOUNDERS HIDING IN THE SAND AS THEY MAKE THEIR WAY TO THE SHALLOW CHANNEL TO INTERSEPT THE SCHOOLS OF BABY SABS EELS.

 

I’ll be on the CAPE the last week of May and maybe the first week ofJune if the bite is on.


 

Tight Lines Y’all!  RJ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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14 mins ago, RJ said:

Find your self a clear water flat that is near a channel in Cape Cod Bay and visit at dead low tide  scout the flat is sand. Look for “GUZZLES” aka indent tiny channels during baby sand eels.  Your neat crab fly get you shots at Medium to large striped bass.  The Stripers start filtering in to the flats to ambush clouds of golden sand eels!

 

The flats beach usually has a channel at the edge  that is 5’ or more deep. The channels are the work of waves breaking the   Pick GUZZELS THAT FLOWS FROM THE DEEP CHANNEL TO THE  BEACH CHANNEL. WALK OUT TOWARD THE DEEP CHANNEL  PICK A SPOT THAT WILL BE 2.5 FEET AS THE TIDE MOVES UP ON THE FLAT.

 

WHEN YOU SEE A STRIPER COMING TO YOU TOSS YOUR CRAB 40 to 50 FEET FROM YOU AND LET IT SETTLE TO THE BOTTOM OF THE GUZZEL.  

 

WHEN THE FISH IS8 OR 9 FEET FROM YOUR FLY DO 1 STRIP THAT MOVES THE FLY THAT CAUSES A PUFF OF SAND. 
 

THAT 1 STRIP USUALLY CAUSES THE STRIPER TO ATTACK THE CRAB.  IT WILL HIT THE SITE OF THE PUFF AND INHALE THE CRAB INTO IT’s BELLY.  WHEN YOU SEE CLOUD. OFSAND AND THE BRIGHT RED GILL’S STRIP HARD.  
 

THE STRIPED BASS WILL BLOW  UP AND START JUMPING OUT OF THE WATER AND TRY TO GET TO THE DEEP CHANNEL!


STRIPERS HUNT FOR CRABS AND BABY FLOUNDERS HIDING IN THE SAND AS THEY MAKE THEIR WAY TO THE SHALLOW CHANNEL TO INTERSEPT THE SCHOOLS OF BABY SABS EELS.

 

I’ll be on the CAPE the last week of May and maybe the first week ofJune if the bite is on.


 

Tight Lines Y’all!  RJ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That's a beautiful crab

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