WaterSchec

Reading the beach

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Hi All,

 

I surf mostly from the jetties in the (Monmouth County) area. Been having a lot of fun and treading carefully in my Korkers. However I would like to figure out how to pick good spots in between jetties. Any tips or recommends reading on “reading the beach”. I heard about some of the very basics but some days it all looks the same to me...

 

Thanks

Edited by TimS
Please keep the areas more general, thanks :-)

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^^ this.  At first you're going to have difficulty applying what you read and watch, so be patient and you'll get the hang of it.  Next time you catch a couple fish in the same  spot from the sand, take a break and ask yourself why those fish were there.  If you're catching consistently from a jetty, then you probably already have a pretty good grasp of soft structure.  Learn the hard structure and you'll catch with more consistency.

 

90% of the fish are in 10% of the water.  Good luck

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When summer rolls around spend some time in the water swimming around or wading. Take note of how the surface looks and the way the current pulls around these different depths. Steer clear of the cut in the bar, thatll be the rip current. 

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7 mins ago, hurricane1091 said:

Things are wayyyyy more subtle in the real world on the NJ beaches than what you see in the videos and images, be warned.

This^^^

 

I have found that our outer bar is much closer in than LI and our trough is more compact. Because of this shallower water our beach structure changes very frequently. 

 

One of the hardest things to learn for me was finding the cut in the bar. I have to take the time to scout to be successful on the beach front this is one reason why living near the beach pays off 

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It can be hard to spot these things at first- but after some time you’ll have no problem at all... but takes practice and a watchful eye. Paying close attention to the water surface. 

 

If you have time- go to the beach when the waves are about 3 ft in the middle of an extreme tide change and it will be helpful in spotting these things. Of even a flat west wind day during a tide change. Remember that waves generally break in something like 1.3 (or 1.6)ft x the wave height. So a 2 ft wave starts to breaks in about   2.6ft of water. I forget the multiplier number if it’s 1.3 or 1.6... 

 

anyways, most fish are caught in the above areas listed in the videos - a lot of times like 10ft from your feet on the beach! 

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