Joe G

Sewage discharge into the canal

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I'm unsure what impact this will have on the canal fishery,  but plans for upper Cape sewage discharge into the canal are moving forward.

 

The plan is to shift sewage outflow from the Agawam River to the CCC via an outfall pipe at the MMA in Bourne.  Reports say it is an attempt to send treated waste water directly into the canal to clean up waters and estuaries impacted by nitrogen over load.  Outflow pipe will be below low water off the far end of MMA bulkhead.

 

MMA is currently discharging its treated waste water directly into the canal in the vicinity of the proposed outflow pipe. 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Joe G

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1 hour ago, Joe G said:

I'm unsure what impact this will have on the canal fishery,  but plans for upper Cape sewage discharge into the canal are moving forward.

 

The plan is to shift sewage outflow from the Agawam River to the CCC via an outfall pipe at the MMA in Bourne.  Reports say it is an attempt to send treated waste water directly into the canal to clean up waters and estuaries impacted by nitrogen over load.  Outflow pipe will be below low water off the far end of MMA bulkhead.

 

MMA is currently discharging its treated waste water directly into the canal in the vicinity of the proposed outflow pipe. 

 

 

 

 

The key word here is "treated", treated to what degree???????????  out here in Mayberry there are 3 towns that discharge "treated" water into the Ware River and it is safe for all uses except drinking as it flows, the same for the Quabog, Swift and Chicopee rivers.

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There’s an article in the Bourne Enterprise that outlines some info.  It sounds like the Wareham plant currently treats about 3.5 million gallons per day down to about 95% free of nutrients.  The plant has the capacity to treat up to 10 million gallons per day.
 

 This would certainly help to clean up the Agawam River.

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Joe just read the article on this discharge into the canal/ That is all well and good except when they are overwhelmed, during some other process and let it go with out treating it all . There should be a secondary treatment at the final destination that may need to be followed up in case of such an situation. Peace and Prayers 

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The problem with released treated water is in the event of heavy rainfall, sewage plants get overwhelmed. 
 

With that being said, Deer Island in Boston releases treated water miles out off The Harbor. I have not heard of anything bad yet. 

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Just now, The Riddler said:

The problem with released treated water is in the event of heavy rainfall, sewage plants get overwhelmed. 
 

With that being said, Deer Island in Boston releases treated water miles out off The Harbor. I have not heard of anything bad yet. 

Getting us a nice replacement for the lack of stripers.

 

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27 mins ago, The Riddler said:

The problem with released treated water is in the event of heavy rainfall, sewage plants get overwhelmed. 
 

With that being said, Deer Island in Boston releases treated water miles out off The Harbor. I have not heard of anything bad yet. 

Federal law states that storm runoff and sewerage have to be seperated so this does not happen.  Billions of dollars have be spent seperating these two flows and this being a new project I am sure this will happen.

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30 mins ago, Angler #1 said:

I wonder if that will be current depended or just a constant discharge?

Good question.  I could not see where that specific point was addressed, Carl.

 

However, my guess is that if 3.5 million gallons are coming from Wareham daily, I'm not sure if there are holding facilities large enough to hold, say, a portion of that for a current dependent discharge.  Therefore I'm guessing it will be a constant discharge.

 

That said, if there was a choice, in the perfect world maybe start discharging it on the ebb, say a 1/2 hour after the west turn.  Flush everything out, dilute it with Buzzards Bay waters the subsequent 5 1/2 hours and then dilute it further when she turns east.  

 

Article mentioned a 55-80 billion gallon of waterflow per day thru the canal.  Measured against the treated 3.5 million gallon dump seems inconsequential .......but ya never know.  As there are a number of beds nearby, the area shell fisherman seem to be taking this very seriously.  

 

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7 mins ago, Joe G said:

 

 

 As there are a number of beds nearby, the area shell fisherman seem to be taking this very seriously.  

 

The state is "stocking" areas w/ oysters to help w/ water quality,effluent and septic field runoff issues(they're filter feeders so they suck out all the "crap") and ppl don't seem to think twice about harvesting/eating oysters full of sewage,why is this different?

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3 mins ago, slip n slide said:

The state is "stocking" areas w/ oysters to help w/ water quality,effluent and septic field runoff issues(they're filter feeders so they suck out all the "crap") and ppl don't seem to think twice about harvesting/eating oysters full of sewage,why is this different?

 

Good point.....probably a number of reasons, but I'm not privy to their thoughts.

 

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3 hours ago, b-ware said:

Federal law states that storm runoff and sewerage have to be seperated so this does not happen.  Billions of dollars have be spent seperating these two flows and this being a new project I am sure this will happen.

True. But here is what I see. I am a master plumber by trade. In Boston and almost all other towns in Metro Boston there is no independent 

Storm.  You run your Storm Drains thru the foundation wall and tie into your Sanitary Drain outside the foundation wall. Its for the future. The cost to have a dedicated storm system is in the high billions in metro Boston.  We have Deer Island and Nut Island, both sewage treatment. In the near future there will be Storm treatment for a few rivers.  Waiting on funds from fed dollars and local. 
 

 

Some towns have an independent treatment systems for Sewage and Storm with dedicated piping for each.  
A small town is cheaper to do than an entire metropolis, but make no mistake about it, on extreme down pours and flooding, towns will relieve storms into sanitary.  Some towns have backwater valves most don't.  That raw sewage finds its way back into the storm and our local Rivers.  Mystic, Charles, Saugus, Fore River, Merrimack, all New England Rivers deal with this. The way it is. 

Edited by The Riddler

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28 mins ago, The Riddler said:

True. But here is what I see. I am a master plumber by trade. In Boston and almost all other towns in Metro Boston there is no independent 

Storm.  You run your Storm Drains thru the foundation wall and tie into your Sanitary Drain outside the foundation wall. Its for the future. The cost to have a dedicated storm system is in the high billions in metro Boston.  We have Deer Island and Nut Island, both sewage treatment. In the near future there will be Storm treatment for a few rivers.  Waiting on funds from fed dollars and local. 
 

Some towns have an independent treatment systems for Sewage and Storm with dedicated piping for each.  
A small town is cheaper to do than an entire metropolis, but make no mistake about it, on extreme down pours and flooding, towns will relieve storms into sanitary.  Some towns have backwater valves most don't.  That raw sewage finds its way back into the storm and our local Rivers.  Mystic, Charles, Saugus, Fore River, Merrimack, all New England Rivers deal with this. The way it is. 

Riddler, Boston has not completely separated their combined sewers but there are plenty of separated drains throughout the city now...

also, I hope you're not connecting roof drains with sewer drains outside the building...no way BWSC oks that for new construction...point of fact, BWSC requires roof drains to connect to a drywell onsite before connecting to the street drainage system...no town anywhere has a municipal stormwater treatment system, even the MS4 communities...individual sites have to provide a certain amount of pretreatment but that's a DEP requirement...

 

 

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