MAGA

Longer spinning rod

62 posts in this topic

Longer is better for me.  I also use my waders to get in front of the brushes and cast parallel to the shore.

 

Waders (or wet wading) is a little used part of a lot on fw anglers arsenal.  It makes a huge difference for access

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7'6 is the longest I go, 7ml premiers' are my staple rod for most boat an bank scenarios.  For exclusive bank fishing a short stout rod almost always gets the nod specifically the mh premier.  Powers into wind, gets distance with its power an turns fish away from cover fast but sometimes on calmer days the longer softer rods are best for distsnce.   Between a 6mh 7 ml and 7'6ml I can cover any water.  My trout rods range from 5 to 6' also in the ml class.  

Edited by DeepBlue85

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I use an 8.5'  rod for most of my freshwater shore fishing. From topwater at night, jigging for walleye in rivers, lakers in the reservoirs, and I use it for funny fish in the salt, it clearly gives me more distance. I use a Stradic 4000 for the line capacity as the 3000s did not leave enough line on the spools (after cutbacks as the season goes) and I use 25lb Gliss line that gives me more distance than any other line of the same weight/diameter. 

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Most of my FF rods are 6-7', mostly used in my kayak.  I also use a 5'4" UL for small water with a lot of trees/brush.  I recently got a 8.5' for trout/landlocked/shad from shore that I won't use until next season.  Paired it with a Quantum Accurist PT25 that I already had that needed a home. 15lb braid.

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I use 7-1/2 to 7' rods for most of my fishing especially when I am wading or in a boat, but it depends on the fishing technique and situation. 

 

Longer rods generally cast further and work well as shock absorbers when you fighting larger fish or soft mouthed species on braid. The also tend to be a little more versatile with the size of lures you can cast, however the longer they are the more your casting accuracy will suffer depending on the rod and its action.

 

If you want better accuracy over shorter distances, or need a shorter rod stroke like when you are vertically jigging or moving a jig over the bottom short distances with each pull, a 6 or 6/12' rod might be better.

 

About 30 years ago 5-1/2' ultra light minnow riffles with tiny reels were very popular. They were a hoot to catch a big fish on, but they did not do a lot for your fishing or the fish when you ended up fighting them to the point of exhaustion. The tiny reels were also more finicky when it came to line management and I ended up re-purposing my tiny ultra light reels for ice fishing with short rods ice fishing rods and soft copolymer lines use for cold water applications like ice fishing.

Edited by Jay Blair

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RWP, I own a pair of Loomis 1021c’s: My first was bought decades ago in their old Premier model and the other is a newer IMX. They are close to the length of your ICBM and cover nearly the same lure ranges. These rods now are designated as Salmon Steelhead hot shot rods when I first bought one it was just under the Salmon Steelhead  genre though I have never used them for those species. As a shore based angler I recognized early I needed as much casting distance as I could get ( even bought some Euro based 11’-12’ back then but always favored the 1021c’s) 

 

I have used them for LMB, Snakeheads, Blues, Stripers, Flounder, and even weakfish. I can’t think of any freshwater to inshore saltwater species these 1021c’s could not handle if needed to. I get the versatility you favor with your ICBM’s as it’s nice to have one setup that will throw everything in your box if needed. 
 

 

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All depends on where and how your fishing, river, stream, wading, bank vertical  jigging ,surf and much more. A rod isn't just for delivering the offering, but also action, reflex, stopping power etc. and on and on. As most said we all learn that we end with more and more rods. For surf I use an 8.6" , steelhead float fishing 10.6", for piers 7' bridges 9'  etc. Remember there are vast performance qualities in all blanks. We all have favorites, Fine tuning your casting requirements, offerings and surroundings for landing so also be thrown in. PS, just tell your wife it was a fantastic BOGO sale; buy 1 get 5 

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I have been at this game for well over 60 years.... my fishing tackle accumulated over the years could challenge that of most small local tackle shops. I do have my old favorites and some new ones because this disease seems to never stop. Even at near 70 years of age this year I just recently bought a new favorite goto rod from Century a 7’10” Weapon Jr MAG and a IRT 200 to pair with it. It just never ends..... 

 

As far as wives and stuff? Get a toy room and just stack another tube in the closet or rod and reel case against the walls. If you only have a handful of gear hiding is tough if you have hundreds of gear it’s easy ;)

 

It’s all part of the game for me.... I like trying new stuff and thinking out of the box as much as the pullage. Fishing, shooting, and photography are my only vices 

Edited by Jim DE

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I have seen some Steelhead rods used for specialty presentations like precisely positioning small lure in riffle pockets and for bait and jig presentations to catch lots of fish, but the are not versatile enough for most of the fishing I do.

 

6-1/2' to 7-1/2' covers just most of my fishing needs, but then your choices are somewhat limited when your start looking for longer rods. Saltwater, Flipping, and Steelhead rods are pretty much it. 

 

The Bass Market drives and dominates most of our fishing tackle industry. 

 

Ironically my best trout rods are 7-1/2' specialty light and medium light fast action bass rods. Great smallmouth rods that happen to be great trout rods as well and that just seems to be the way of things these days. The engineering on the new specialty trout spinning rods seems to have slacked in recent years. If they don't cast lures well, I trade them in for a rod that does.

Edited by Jay Blair

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I still like the old school 5’6” and under ultralights for my trout fishing creeks and streams. Old habits die hard especially successful ones. But honestly maybe 2% of my trout fishing had been done with anything but fly tackle. 
 

Can’t remember the number Loomis I use the most for River bass I think it’s a 901s nrx which is also my drop shot and wacky worm goto eventhough it’s a bit lighter than I like in backbone for hook sets. Those 1021’s are my Swiss Army knife equivalents if I know I am going shore fishing for something but not sure what for when I get there. I have not had the situation in fresh or salt that these could not do the job. But then again these are conventionals and I run Calcutta 201’s on thin as their primary reels and various saltwater reels from diawa and penn as their backup reels. My one Calcutta 201 Te DC I don’t use in the salt so I switch it out if needed. I carry both rigged up and in a dbl 9’ takedown salmon steelhead hard case with backup reels in the side pockets. I have used them from Florida to Maine and transport well no matter what the mode of travel. 
 

I am old so the years tend to blend together but I think I bought my first 1021 either in the 90’s or early 2000’s. I go away and return to these regularly as they as just so versatile. If I was stuck with one rod and reel for everything it would possibly be one of these or this 7’10” weapon jr mag in spinning 

Edited by Jim DE

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I use a 9ft tfo and a 10ft black hole,,,,:eek: I get funny looks from the week end warriors,,,,,,,,,:dismay: but when you got cast 80ft with 100ft out to get to the fish and your going to need every inch of the rod to pull up the slack to hook the fish,,,,,,:idea: but sometimes it makes a difference,,,,,,,,,,,:D

20201227_174714.jpg

20201227_174653.jpg

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13 mins ago, bennie said:

I use a 9ft tfo and a 10ft black hole,,,,:eek: I get funny looks from the week end warriors,,,,,,,,,:dismay: but when you got cast 80ft with 100ft out to get to the fish and your going to need every inch of the rod to pull up the slack to hook the fish,,,,,,:idea: but sometimes it makes a difference,,,,,,,,,,,:D

20201227_174714.jpg

20201227_174653.jpg

 

Surf rods do work great in fw.

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3 hours ago, Beastly Backlash said:

 

Surf rods do work great in fw.

Rod 7.9oz reel 7.2oz or so,,,,,:idea: yes it's not easy casting a 10ft rod it takes time,,,,,:) but when you can nail it where you want only little girls use  a 7ft but this little uses a 12ft,,,,,,,,,:D

20181103_150749_015_01.jpg

Edited by bennie

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On 11/22/2020 at 8:52 AM, RWP said:

Yes. My most used freshwater rod is a megabass ICBM.

 

It's pretty much replaced everything else. It's rated 3/8-3oz, and it's accurate.

Better be for the price of them.  Wow as a bank rod.

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