Frede

What's with these OLD guys?

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Nice read, shame you lost contact awkward position for you. You have to weigh each situation as far as strangers. I told the story before so I won't repeat but the gist of it helped him out and took pics. Next time I see him he said how he put it on FB, he was done for me.

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4 hours ago, Frede said:

After bugging my step-father he finally brought me long on an overnight surf fishing trip - it was late '69 and he'd just returned from Vietnam.  He was a Marine and told me "you can go with me but no moaning" to which I agreed.  Pretty sure it would have taken 3 or 4 men to take him down, but I didn't fear him....I just knew I'd have to abide by the agreement.  My step-father was a machinist whos unit was a Marine fighter attach squadron....the man could build or fix anything.  After a few qualifying trips to the beach (mostly devoid of my moaning) he built me a custom rod.  Everything else we used was repurposed for surf....USMC belt and amo bag on his shoulder.  He was respected, his "click" was established but also open to others.  When we walked the beach he spoke to everybody....helped new guys, offered info and shared tackle.  He and my mother divorced in '72.  I never saw my step-father again, but those surf trips got burned into my DNA.  

 

When I turned 17 I bought a 4x4, some inexpensive tackle and I returned to the locations I fished with my step-father.  It was still a time when there wasn't much for the surf, or I couldn't afford it.  Also, info was scarce and without my step-father most of the elders we not approachable....and I'm being kind.  I was left to search my vague memories of fishing with my step-father, I used his methods and improvised my own.

 

In hindsight my step-father was young, but his click was mostly older guys, so why was he respected.  I guess now that I'm an old guy (mostly not a salty one) I may understand why.  It was his commitment and love for a lifestyle where fall runs became part of his life.....the struggle to do just enough "honey do" list to keep peace with the Mrs, the struggle keep his job, and to leave yardwork pile up 3 feet high.  I try to be like my step-father, I talk to and help everyone.  I don't believe, I should command respect, nor do I deserve it. Of course I'm not going to walk a guy directly to my fishing spots, but if I see a guy on a beach a few times at 4am when it's 19 degrees I'll offer some very specific tips if it's obvious he needs them.  Key words there are "very specific tips,4am and 19 degrees" but I guess you know what I mean. 

 

Signed - the nice old guy          

My cuz is one of those nice old guys

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6 hours ago, squidder 329 said:

Nice read, shame you lost contact awkward position for you. You have to weigh each situation as far as strangers. I told the story before so I won't repeat but the gist of it helped him out and took pics. Next time I see him he said how he put it on FB, he was done for me.

The worst part is he passed away before I could track him down later in life but I'm at peace with it.

 

Not very smart of him but I wouldn't let it discourage you because those that use FB to find fish don't go fishing much at 4 am.....they sleep late.  They look at FB at 8 am then arrive on the beach around 10 am ready to catch the 40.

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5 hours ago, suntzu said:

My story is completely different. My father returned from Vietnam in 68 and had no interest in fishing, he was busy, I have 8 brothers and sisters. My grandmother lived in Pt beach and as the oldest of 9 i often was sent to stay with her. She didn’t like fishing but she loved Martells so I had the chance as a kid to fish all the time from the RR bridge Inlet and out front, but all I had was freshwater gear, but I tried hard and watched a lot. For months the okd guys ignored me and my questions (i was 12) but after awhile they saw the passion and commitment and helped me. Taught me knots, how to read the beach, gave me my first bucktail and darter, told me that was all I needed Finally they dragged my into Martells up to the bar and told my grandmother she needed to get me proper gear, she put out her smoke picked up her drink and walked me straight up Arnold Ave to Pt Pleasant Hardware and asked them to build me a custom surf rod. They did and I still have it

I have fished on 6 continents, 40 countries but if those old guys didn’t take the time to help me out I would have probably given up. I help everyone I can without question- i owe

Wow and you still have the rod.

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On 11/20/2020 at 4:01 PM, Frede said:

After bugging my step-father he finally brought me long on an overnight surf fishing trip - it was late '69 and he'd just returned from Vietnam.  He was a Marine and told me "you can go with me but no moaning" to which I agreed.  Pretty sure it would have taken 3 or 4 men to take him down, but I didn't fear him....I just knew I'd have to abide by the agreement.  My step-father was a machinist whos unit was a Marine fighter attach squadron....the man could build or fix anything.  After a few qualifying trips to the beach (mostly devoid of my moaning) he built me a custom rod.  Everything else we used was repurposed for surf....USMC belt and amo bag on his shoulder.  He was respected, his "click" was established but also open to others.  When we walked the beach he spoke to everybody....helped new guys, offered info and shared tackle.  He and my mother divorced in '72.  I never saw my step-father again, but those surf trips got burned into my DNA.  

 

When I turned 17 I bought a 4x4, some inexpensive tackle and I returned to the locations I fished with my step-father.  It was still a time when there wasn't much for the surf, or I couldn't afford it.  Also, info was scarce and without my step-father most of the elders we not approachable....and I'm being kind.  I was left to search my vague memories of fishing with my step-father, I used his methods and improvised my own.

 

In hindsight my step-father was young, but his click was mostly older guys, so why was he respected.  I guess now that I'm an old guy (mostly not a salty one) I may understand why.  It was his commitment and love for a lifestyle where fall runs became part of his life.....the struggle to do just enough "honey do" list to keep peace with the Mrs, the struggle keep his job, and to leave yardwork pile up 3 feet high.  I try to be like my step-father, I talk to and help everyone.  I don't believe, I should command respect, nor do I deserve it. Of course I'm not going to walk a guy directly to my fishing spots, but if I see a guy on a beach a few times at 4am when it's 19 degrees I'll offer some very specific tips if it's obvious he needs them.  Key words there are "very specific tips,4am and 19 degrees" but I guess you know what I mean. 

 

Signed - the nice old guy          

Nice story. Thanks for sharing. My dad was also a machinist. How is it that machinists fly under the radar as the smartest people you will ever meet? Not the new ones..but the old school ones. Too bad we dont value those skills worth a damn and outsourced them all. My dad had an old atlas lathe in his basement that was dismantled into a few boxes. I put the whole thing together in highschool on my own without having the benefit of knowing how it went apart. After I did that I told him "now teach ne how to use it." So he taught me how to grind all the various tools and use the thing .  As far as fishing goes I'm pretty much all self taught. All youtube videos, countless hours reading SOL archives (the older the better), and spending lots of time on the water. Still learning. Just be careful..if youre nice to me you might just get a handful of PMs on a regular basis. 

Edited by adams54

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17 hours ago, adams54 said:

Nice story. Thanks for sharing. My dad was also a machinist. How is it that machinists fly under the radar as the smartest people you will ever meet? Not the new ones..but the old school ones. Too bad we dont value those skills worth a damn and outsourced them all. My dad had an old atlas lathe in his basement that was dismantled into a few boxes. I put the whole thing together in highschool on my own without having the benefit of knowing how it went apart. After I did that I told him "now teach ne how to use it." So he taught me how to grind all the various tools and use the thing .  As far as fishing goes I'm pretty much all self taught. All youtube videos, countless hours reading SOL archives (the older the better), and spending lots of time on the water. Still learning. Just be careful..if youre nice to me you might just get a handful of PMs on a regular basis. 

Yup. My dad owned a tool and die shop in Elizabeth.

Taught my brother and me at an early age. Mostly fresh-water.

My mom was pretty good with a fly rod, too. I've had the pleasure of trout fishing with both my parents many times in Vermont as a kid. Miss them both. 

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17 hours ago, adams54 said:

Nice story. Thanks for sharing. My dad was also a machinist. How is it that machinists fly under the radar as the smartest people you will ever meet? Not the new ones..but the old school ones. Too bad we dont value those skills worth a damn and outsourced them all. My dad had an old atlas lathe in his basement that was dismantled into a few boxes. I put the whole thing together in highschool on my own without having the benefit of knowing how it went apart. After I did that I told him "now teach ne how to use it." So he taught me how to grind all the various tools and use the thing .  As far as fishing goes I'm pretty much all self taught. All youtube videos, countless hours reading SOL archives (the older the better), and spending lots of time on the water. Still learning. Just be careful..if youre nice to me you might just get a handful of PMs on a regular basis. 

 

16 mins ago, Sparky said:

Yup. My dad owned a tool and die shop in Elizabeth.

Taught my brother and me at an early age. Mostly fresh-water.

My mom was pretty good with a fly rod, too. I've had the pleasure of trout fishing with both my parents many times in Vermont as a kid. Miss them both. 

Yeah agreed.  They live in a world of tolerances most can't image....no wonder everything else comes so easy to those guys.  My step-father did carpentry, stone work, plumbing, electrical etc.  He worked at a tool and die shop and as an auto mechanic part-time at his friends garage.  Unfortunately I wasn't around him long enough to absorb all those skills, but I learned most going through life....exception being the tool and die skills, which as you guys highlighted is a whole other level.  I think the main thing I learned from my step-father was NEVER believe you can't do something.....the Marine Corp taught him that some transferred to me.  I also picked up his love for the surf fishing.      

 

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1 hour ago, Frede said:

 

Yeah agreed.  They live in a world of tolerances most can't image....no wonder everything else comes so easy to those guys.  My step-father did carpentry, stone work, plumbing, electrical etc.  He worked at a tool and die shop and as an auto mechanic part-time at his friends garage.  Unfortunately I wasn't around him long enough to absorb all those skills, but I learned most going through life....exception being the tool and die skills, which as you guys highlighted is a whole other level.  I think the main thing I learned from my step-father was NEVER believe you can't do something.....the Marine Corp taught him that some transferred to me.  I also picked up his love for the surf fishing.      

 

My dad wasnt in the marines but I picked up the attitude you're speaking of. Yeah after dealing with all the tolerances and mental gymnastics needed to set up and machine complex parts all of the other areas seem like childs play. We did it all. Just like you said..auto repair, carpentry, hvac, electrical, etc. The sky was the limit. As long as it wasnt any paperwork or God help us...legal work. It was hilarious watching him do rough carpentry though. You know that saying "measure twice cut once?" For him it was more like measure 4 times cut once. Thats a machinist quality. One mental or measurement error and you now have an expensive paperweight. So that was funny..plus the fact he applied a super precision mindset to areas it wasnt needed and would just waste time. I guess the moral of all this reminiscing is that old guys rule. It was that style that built this country. Now everything is taken for granted and people are baby **** soft. When things get tough it will be a real trip.

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I'm an old guy and somewhat new to salt, 6 or 7 years? But i love it.

 

Although not a serious sharpie when it come to bass (i try)I've become pretty good at beach fluke in the summer.

 

I've taught quite a few kids and newbies that I meet fishing. Tie em a teaser loop, give em a weight, couple hooks and some gulp..

 

Many ask for help because I'm catching where the swimmers aren't. Sure, I always try to make the time for that. It's fun.

 

Anyway, I hope the fun and memories  that a few tips from this old timer trickle down, maybe into the next generation. 

 

Some cool stories in this thread! Love hearing them.

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1 hour ago, adams54 said:

So that was funny..plus the fact he applied a super precision mindset to areas it wasnt needed and would just waste time.

My engineer father is so guilty of this! 

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7 hours ago, adams54 said:

My dad wasnt in the marines but I picked up the attitude you're speaking of. Yeah after dealing with all the tolerances and mental gymnastics needed to set up and machine complex parts all of the other areas seem like childs play. We did it all. Just like you said..auto repair, carpentry, hvac, electrical, etc. The sky was the limit. As long as it wasnt any paperwork or God help us...legal work. It was hilarious watching him do rough carpentry though. You know that saying "measure twice cut once?" For him it was more like measure 4 times cut once. Thats a machinist quality. One mental or measurement error and you now have an expensive paperweight. So that was funny..plus the fact he applied a super precision mindset to areas it wasnt needed and would just waste time. I guess the moral of all this reminiscing is that old guys rule. It was that style that built this country. Now everything is taken for granted and people are baby **** soft. When things get tough it will be a real trip.

Sounds like my kind of guy.  "Super precision mindset" lol my family gets very annoyed with me because of that.  I'm no machinist but I measure 4 times an analyze everything like crazy.....I know I do it but can't stop.     

5 hours ago, Ash said:

My engineer father is so guilty of this! 

Upside is things were right around your house....and all the money he saved hiring people.

Edited by Frede

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