dena

Airing Down

28 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, runnsfromcops said:

 

tell us more about your truck because that thing looks badass in the profile thumbnail.

97 Land Cruiser

Factory Locking Diffs

3" Dobinson Heavy Lift

35" D-Tracs 

Front and Rear winches

Dual batteries 

Bull bar plate front bumper

Dual swing out rear bumper

Full roof rack

S#!t ton of HID lighting 

Black and Tan bedliner from top to bottom

 

Over half a million miles and still runs like new

 

 

 

 

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Unfortunately, she just isn't practical for my 90 mile daily commute as she gets the worst gas mileage out of all my cars, so she's been limited to beach duty for the last few years

 

 

 

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On 11/22/2020 at 11:07 PM, Capt Buck said:

126606413_3454027814677605_98253672411307095_n.jpg

That a superb illustration! Notice tire width is really not effected by airing down, The big effect is the tire conforming to the surface and the longer length of tire in the sand, almost like a ski. More tire in the direction of travel. 

Taller tires make a much bigger difference than wide ones. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

My rig in the avatar was a two wheeler. Had to pick and choose the beaches, but mainly fished Montauk [Shagwong]. Towed a 16' fiberglass boat and launched down there....and had plenty of very helpful friends:howdy:.

8p.s.i. in the front-10 in the rear

Edited by sandflea5

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17 hours ago, sandflea5 said:

My rig in the avatar was a two wheeler. Had to pick and choose the beaches, but mainly fished Montauk [Shagwong]. Towed a 16' fiberglass boat and launched down there....and had plenty of very helpful friends:howdy:.

8p.s.i. in the front-10 in the rear

Bias ply, not radials I'll bet!

 

 

Radial tires made so much of a difference when they came out. Not anywhere near as stiff as the bias ply. My boat trailer came with bias ply tires and pulling it was like dragging an anchor or two. One trip was all it took for me to replace them with radials. After the swap, I would forget the trailer was behind me. 

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Something I learned to do was to figure out the safest/lowest pressure I could run. 

On a flat hard surface, I would air out a front or rear tire until a wrinkle developed in the sidewall. That was the "no-go" reference I would keep in my head. I'd always run 3 or 4 psi above that. In an emergency, I would air down to the minimum to pull others out of stuck situations. Never lost a bead on the beach except in the motorhome and that was due to me digging sand out from under the tires to level the rig.  Pulled too much out on one side before walking around to the other. It was right after a back surgery and I was lazy.... I started using the hydraulic levelers after that.... 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

You're right,J

      8  ply 12.00 - 16.5. 10 ply were just not soft enough. Luckily in the eleven years I had that rig I never blew out a bead.And we probably did twenty weekends a year.

 

Sadly, that truck spent it's last days painted green and selling hotdogs on the side of the road in Montauk.

Edited by sandflea5

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Posted (edited) · Report post

We have always used 12-15 psi and have not had problems getting stuck nor have ever popped a bead. Staun auto deflaters make it easy and a Viair 300P makes airing up fast.

Suggestion: resist the temptation to put "E" rated 10 ply tires on lighter vehicles like Jeeps and 4Runners, as well as 1500 series 1/2 ton pick ups. They just don't need them and due to how stiff they are, you have to air down even more to get them to flex. Remember the tire flexing is what gives you traction in sand. All you need is a 4x4 system that stays engaged + properly aired down tires,  you don't even need a limited slip diff (our '98 Jeep Grand and '17 Wrangler both have open diffs, my '07 Jeep Grand has the electronic lockers). 

If you are worried about tire damage from sticks, shells etc Goodyear makes an all terrain tire with Kevlar reinforced tread that you can get in "P" rated sizes that would be perfect for lighter vehicles on the beach. Some vehicles that come with a 60 series tire will benefit from a taller 70s series tire if it will fit because they air down much better. I changed the 245/65-17s on my '07 Grand to 245/70-17s and this helped a lot. The 65 series tires looked scary aired down.  

We have used General Grabber AT2s ("P" and "C" rated) and Goodyear Duratracs ("C" rated) and both have been excellent for beach driving. 

Edited by LouC

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