mikez2

Fall trout

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Being 2020, it's been a strange Fall. Two weeks ago, instead of fishing, we went sledding. 

 

Last weekend we went to a popular eastern Ma pond where it was close to 80F. We tried to fish but there were five billion people there, many swimming. We didn't get any fish but had several close calls with people swimming around the circumference of the pond in 3 feet of water.

 

Today we tried a much quieter pond a bit to the west. Very few people around. Nice and peaceful. Lots of trout rising. Quite a few launching 3 feet out of the water in that way the browns do when they want to spawn. 

We got a couple nice trout and one chunky little bass.

Getting psyched for ice.

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Late fall and winter trout fishing is an experience. Middle of the night, shallow flats and dropoff lines. Jerkbaits and Rapalas. There's some big browns and bows to be had.

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4 hours ago, Sandbar1 said:

Late fall and winter trout fishing is an experience. Middle of the night, shallow flats and dropoff lines. Jerkbaits and Rapalas. There's some big browns and bows to be had.

I haven't ever done the middle of the night thing for trout in open water.

Oftentimes during ice fishing season I will start early AM before sunrise and always get a few flags in the dark.

Last winter we got on the ice around 4:30 am on a bright full moon and had mad action for the stretch before sunrise. Nothing big but really got me thinking a night trip might be worth a try.

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I've never trout fished at night. But it's on my bucket list. Maybe once bird season is over next week.

I used to love ice fishing for trout.  Mikez2, like you, I'd set up tilts in the dark. I had special trout tilts. Often I'd have my limit before sunrise.  Small chubs or night crawlers a few feet under the ice. 

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That trip last year we chased flags from the minute the first tipups were set. We didn't have lights on the flags so someone had to constantly walk along the sets and check them. Some went up as soon as the bait was dropped. 

Both shiners and crawlers, some right under the ice, some near bottom in 15-20 feet.

Would dearly love to see that again this season.

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Crappy cell pic from my son's buddy. I didn't know it would turn out so bad or would have taken some myself. 

All we could manage were a few little browns today. This one was a fatty.

 

The amount of rising fish and launching fish was crazy. The risers were chasing those big black midges which were hatching like crazy.

The launchers were browns that rocketed straight up into the air. Sometimes ridiculously high. These were not feeding. We see this at this time of year when browns want to spawn. 

 

So many trout near the surface that we saw ospreys catch 4 and miss a few others.

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On 11/14/2020 at 5:52 PM, mikez2 said:

Being 2020, it's been a strange Fall. Two weeks ago, instead of fishing, we went sledding. 

 

Last weekend we went to a popular eastern Ma pond where it was close to 80F. We tried to fish but there were five billion people there, many swimming. We didn't get any fish but had several close calls with people swimming around the circumference of the pond in 3 feet of water.

 

Today we tried a much quieter pond a bit to the west. Very few people around. Nice and peaceful. Lots of trout rising. Quite a few launching 3 feet out of the water in that way the browns do when they want to spawn. 

We got a couple nice trout and one chunky little bass.

Getting psyched for ice.

 

Those swimmers are wild, I've seen them in their own little worlds plow through peoples bobbers, or into canoers.

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29 mins ago, CoffeeHangover said:

Those swimmers are wild, I've seen them in their own little worlds plow through peoples bobbers, or into canoers.

I used to yell at them. Not in a dickhead way, just to get their attention. But that was when there weren't that many and they were regulars that understood the fishermen. 

Recently their numbers have exploded and they seem to have the attitude that they own the pond and fishermen need to go elsewhere. 

Now I don't yell or warn them. I'm willing to let them run into my line. However I don't have it in me to bomb my water bobber way out like I normally do. That would be a guaranteed swimmer hook up. I don't need that.

Bottom line is, as much as I  love that place, and I go back 40 years there, it seems it's been lost to fishing for a large part of the year.

Sad, but there are a few really good choices elsewhere. 

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Mike thanks for confirming my suspicions about the midge hatch today. I will be out with midge flies tomorrow looking for some of that action.  

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19 hours ago, mikez2 said:

I haven't ever done the middle of the night thing for trout in open water.

Oftentimes during ice fishing season I will start early AM before sunrise and always get a few flags in the dark.

Last winter we got on the ice around 4:30 am on a bright full moon and had mad action for the stretch before sunrise. Nothing big but really got me thinking a night trip might be worth a try.

The night trout bite is IMO one of the best winter fisheries we have in SE MA. Trout are predators and like many other predatory game fish they move into the shallows after dark hunting larger baitfish. I've effectively used Rapala style baits up to 6" for big browns and bows. The strikes are usually barely subsurface and very aggressive and during the fight these tough winter holdovers will dog you until the end.

 

(I'm clearly wearing a white light in these pictures. The same rules that apply to surf stripers apply to these trout. Keep your light beam off of the water at all cost, minimize light as much as possible whenever possible. It's generally best to stick to a red light or no light at all. Be stealthy.)

 

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