kid_just_wants_to_fish

Trout Lures

336 posts in this topic

On 11/23/2020 at 2:39 PM, Mike Mendez said:

A red/gold 1/6 oz Thomas Buoyant is my go-to lure.  As for tube baits, I have caught many rainbows on these Gulp Atomic tubes in the grasshopper color shown.

 

 

Atomic Tube.JPG

How does powerbait in a blister work out?  Is it a pain to store them after opening?  I always just stick to trout magnets for trout plastics, nothing is as durable in that size range.

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3 mins ago, CoffeeHangover said:

How does powerbait in a blister work out?  Is it a pain to store them after opening?  I always just stick to trout magnets for trout plastics, nothing is as durable in that size range.

No prob storing. Just in a small pocket lure box in their own section. They have enough weight, sink and cast well enough to be very easy to fish by themselves, i.e. just tie on leader and your good to go. Smallies grab these too.

JD

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41 mins ago, jjdbike said:

 

Good information to keep in mind. It's details like that that take things to another level. Ever consider writing a book?

So when you say short fat cranks in cray patterns, may I assume you mean lures like Rebel Teeny Wee & Wee Crawfish? See pic.

JD

 

Image 12-30-20 at 10.59 AM.jpeg

My wife thinks I should write books or articles, but that is not my thing.

 

I just like giving back to folks that are willing to listen. Hunting large trout for 55 years you would hope you would learn a thing or two about fishing for them.

 

Once brown trout reaches 20" they are almost 100% piscivorous: in other words the eat other fish. They ones that can adapt to efficiently capturing high protein easily digestible meals without expending too much energy grow the fastest

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, CoffeeHangover said:

How does powerbait in a blister work out?  Is it a pain to store them after opening?  I always just stick to trout magnets for trout plastics, nothing is as durable in that size range.

These tiny tube are a great Winter bait and I have caught trout up to 20" on them in that exact same color. They do tend to dry out and get stiff so it is best to kept them in a closed container or small plastic bags. Their scent goes away fairly quickly so you will want to recharge them with Gulp juice or Procure Trout Gel.  I also use softer unscented tubes and buggy plastics and juice them with Procure.

 

I found some little clear round plastic containers with screw on lids for little scented buggy plastics that work well. I found the containers on a site that caters to the ice fishing crowd. 

 

 

Edited by Jay Blair

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6 hours ago, Jay Blair said:

These tiny tube are a great Winter bait and I have caught trout up to 20" on them in that exact same color. They do tend to dry out and get stiff so it is best to kept them in a closed container or small plastic bags. Their scent goes away fairly quickly so you will want to recharge them with Gulp juice or Procure Trout Gel.  I also use softer unscented tubes and buggy plastics and juice them with Procure.

 

I found some little clear round plastic containers with screw on lids for little scented buggy plastics that work well. I found the containers on a site that caters to the ice fishing crowd. 

 

 

I just use medical specimen jars.  They fairly common to find if you know anyone who frequents a hospital or Dr office

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This past year I started using crappie jigs for trout because I kept losing $20-$30 worth of spinners and spoons in sometimes less than an hour. The tubes worked ok, I think the ones I had were too big. What worked really well were the little marabou jigs that come with the 'ready to fish' kit and the like, I felt a lot better at 4-5/$1 when they end up in a tree or on the bottom.  Also they do a lot less damage to the trout if you are going to release them.

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Posted (edited)

I catch some of my best winter trout on 1/32 oz. jigs with a Berkley Nymph. They catch just about everything in the stream, so long as they are olive sliver. They kind of look like a nymph crossed with crayfish. Fishing and catching with micro jigs takes practice because half the time you are setting the hook by intuition kind of like light Ned Rigs. I use a swim pause swim retrieve and simply get the line tight when a fish bites. If you try to set the hook you will miss a lot of fish. Jigs with small hooks like Apex Crappie jigs work best. Wild and holdover trout shy away from the jig heads with bigger hooks. Surprisingly the small hooks hold well even with the barbs crushed. I high stick the jigs in riffles and worried water in much the same way as fly nymph fisherman and can generally out fish them. Keep a semi tight line with your retrieve and you are good to go

 

I experimented with micro jigs for winter trout for many years and this is the deadliest combination I have found.

 

My micro jig outfit is a 7-12' light power fast action rod with 6 lb. J-braid 8X and a 4 or 2 lb. fluoro leader.  A 7' ultra light would work as well or better if it is a fast action rod. It is easier to high stick and set the hook with a longer rod. In pools simply let the jig sink to the appropriate depth and pulse it back with your swim pause retrieve. If the jig makes bottom contact too much you will get hung up on rock gravel substrates, so adjusting your cadence to the water speed is important whether you are fishing up stream, across and upstream, or across and downstream.

 

I have caught trout, chubs, fall fish, bluegill, bass, crappie and perch on these little rascals.

 

I like to be in direct contact with the jigs when I fish, however I am sure they would work just fine under a slip bobber.

 

Keep it in our little community.

 

 Berkley Powerbait Power Nymph Fishing Bait 1 Inch Pearl Olive Shad PBHPN1-POS

Edited by Jay Blair

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Couple years back I fell in love with tiny ice fishing jigs during cold months for almost all my freshwater.  I usually use a slip bobber.   Stick a maggot or a 1in GULP minnow on. 

I think of it as iceless ice fishing.  

I think my best catches were a 24in(+/-) pickerel, 20+ in rainbow, and a 3-4lb lmb. 

 

I'll check out those Berkley Nymphs. That looks like a winner!

 

As far as crawfish, definite food source! Even for me :howdy:

Few times each summer girls and I wade the rivers with dip nets.  Usually get a half bushel within 2-3hours. Only do about 100yd area.   But I've caught crawfish in every body of water I've fished in CT, NY & NH. I always drop a minnow trap where ever I go. 

  Only thing I don't like about those crawfish cranks is those trebels snag alot.  I bet a big double hook in the belly would work. 

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20 hours ago, Jay Blair said:

I catch some of my best winter trout on 1/32 oz. jigs with a Berkley Nymph. They catch just about everything in the stream, so long as they are olive sliver. They kind of look like a nymph crossed with crayfish. Fishing and catching with micro jigs takes practice because half the time you are setting the hook by intuition kind of like light Ned Rigs. I use a swim pause swim retrieve and simply get the line tight when a fish bites. If you try to set the hook you will miss a lot of fish. Jigs with small hooks like Apex Crappie jigs work best. Wild and holdover trout shy away from the jig heads with bigger hooks. Surprisingly the small hooks hold well even with the barbs crushed. I high stick the jigs in riffles and worried water in much the same way as fly nymph fisherman and can generally out fish them. Keep a semi tight line with your retrieve and you are good to go

 

I experimented with micro jigs for winter trout for many years and this is the deadliest combination I have found.

 

My micro jig outfit is a 7-12' light power fast action rod with 6 lb. J-braid 8X and a 4 or 2 lb. fluoro leader.  A 7' ultra light would work as well or better if it is a fast action rod. It is easier to high stick and set the hook with a longer rod. In pools simply let the jig sink to the appropriate depth and pulse it back with your swim pause retrieve. If the jig makes bottom contact too much you will get hung up on rock gravel substrates, so adjusting your cadence to the water speed is important whether you are fishing up stream, across and upstream, or across and downstream.

 

I have caught trout, chubs, fall fish, bluegill, bass, crappie and perch on these little rascals.

 

I like to be in direct contact with the jigs when I fish, however I am sure they would work just fine under a slip bobber.

 

Keep it in our little community.

 

 Berkley Powerbait Power Nymph Fishing Bait 1 Inch Pearl Olive Shad PBHPN1-POS

Just bought some lol

 

Thanks 

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20 hours ago, Jay Blair said:

I catch some of my best winter trout on 1/32 oz. jigs with a Berkley Nymph. They catch just about everything in the stream, so long as they are olive sliver. They kind of look like a nymph crossed with crayfish. Fishing and catching with micro jigs takes practice because half the time you are setting the hook by intuition kind of like light Ned Rigs. I use a swim pause swim retrieve and simply get the line tight when a fish bites. If you try to set the hook you will miss a lot of fish. Jigs with small hooks like Apex Crappie jigs work best. Wild and holdover trout shy away from the jig heads with bigger hooks. Surprisingly the small hooks hold well even with the barbs crushed. I high stick the jigs in riffles and worried water in much the same way as fly nymph fisherman and can generally out fish them. Keep a semi tight line with your retrieve and you are good to go

 

I experimented with micro jigs for winter trout for many years and this is the deadliest combination I have found.

 

My micro jig outfit is a 7-12' light power fast action rod with 6 lb. J-braid 8X and a 4 or 2 lb. fluoro leader.  A 7' ultra light would work as well or better if it is a fast action rod. It is easier to high stick and set the hook with a longer rod. In pools simply let the jig sink to the appropriate depth and pulse it back with your swim pause retrieve. If the jig makes bottom contact too much you will get hung up on rock gravel substrates, so adjusting your cadence to the water speed is important whether you are fishing up stream, across and upstream, or across and downstream.

 

I have caught trout, chubs, fall fish, bluegill, bass, crappie and perch on these little rascals.

 

I like to be in direct contact with the jigs when I fish, however I am sure they would work just fine under a slip bobber.

 

Keep it in our little community.

 

 Berkley Powerbait Power Nymph Fishing Bait 1 Inch Pearl Olive Shad PBHPN1-POS

Hey Jay,

This is solid gold info here!

Sounds like how we use trout magnets. I do like how this nymph body implies life and could be mistaken for a variety of aquatic organisms. 

I am familiar with this technique you described here. Decades ago I was a fly fisher. I nymphed with a long super light rod (9' 3 weight) and high stick drifted nymphs in the way you described. Tiny foam strike indicators function similarly to the tiny floats used w/ trout magnets.

You mentioned the importance of using a jig with a small hook. You named Apex crappie jig heads. These are round and painted bright colors. I wonder how magnet's dart style head would work w/ that Berkley nymph. Magnet heads are designed to present the bait horizontally and are available in 1/32 for crappie Magnets, 1/64 for trout Magnets and even smaller as "Mini Magnets". See pic below. 

Have you tried these?

JD

 

Image 1-3-21 at 6.02 AM.jpeg

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, PSegnatelli said:

Couple years back I fell in love with tiny ice fishing jigs during cold months for almost all my freshwater.  I usually use a slip bobber.   Stick a maggot or a 1in GULP minnow on. 

I think of it as iceless ice fishing.  

I think my best catches were a 24in(+/-) pickerel, 20+ in rainbow, and a 3-4lb lmb. 

 

I'll check out those Berkley Nymphs. That looks like a winner!

 

As far as crawfish, definite food source! Even for me :howdy:

Few times each summer girls and I wade the rivers with dip nets.  Usually get a half bushel within 2-3hours. Only do about 100yd area.   But I've caught crawfish in every body of water I've fished in CT, NY & NH. I always drop a minnow trap where ever I go. 

  Only thing I don't like about those crawfish cranks is those trebels snag alot.  I bet a big double hook in the belly would work. 

That is why I use floating and suspending smallmouth-sized square bill crankbaits designed to deflect off of rocks.

 

Like smallmouths, large brown trout are often attracted and trigger by lures making contact with the bottom or other structure like a real crawfish or bait fish trying to avoid capture.

 

Many years ago one of my buddies out fished all of us with a fat floating bomber crawfish finish crankbait. In a tough highly pressured river he showed the trout something they wanted they had not seen before. He got 12 big brown trout in about two hours. That is the kind of lesson that tends to stay with you.

 

Will all tend to go with what we know has worked in the past. When those techniques don't work you need to think outside of the box. 

Edited by Jay Blair

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, jjdbike said:

Hey Jay,

This is solid gold info here!

Sounds like how we use trout magnets. I do like how this nymph body implies life and could be mistaken for a variety of aquatic organisms. 

I am familiar with this technique you described here. Decades ago I was a fly fisher. I nymphed with a long super light rod (9' 3 weight) and high stick drifted nymphs in the way you described. Tiny foam strike indicators function similarly to the tiny floats used w/ trout magnets.

You mentioned the importance of using a jig with a small hook. You named Apex crappie jig heads. These are round and painted bright colors. I wonder how magnet's dart style head would work w/ that Berkley nymph. Magnet heads are designed to present the bait horizontally and are available in 1/32 for crappie Magnets, 1/64 for trout Magnets and even smaller as "Mini Magnets". See pic below. 

Have you tried these?

JD

 

Image 1-3-21 at 6.02 AM.jpeg

I have and they work great, especially on stocked trout and some holdover trout. I find the nymph with the small jig head works for all trout; including wild trout.

While the dart heads have a small hook they don't have a keeper on the shank of the hook to keep the plastic from slipping down the hook toward the bend. Most of the small steelhead jig heads don't have a keeper and their hooks tend to be on the large size. I would love to use a tiny steelhead jig head with a sickle style hook, but I have not found what I want. Maybe this year someone will offer them.

s-l500.jpg

 

 

The little 1/32 oz. Apex jig heads have a smaller hook and have a keeper on the shank for crappie plastics. I believe Eagle Claw also has 1/32 oz. jig heads with the keepers and smaller hooks.

 

s-l640.jpg

Edited by Jay Blair

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1 hour ago, Jay Blair said:

That is why I use floating and suspending smallmouth-sized square bill crankbaits designed to deflect off of rocks.

 

Like smallmouths, large brown trout are often attracted and trigger by lures making contact with the bottom or other structure like a real crawfish or bait fish trying to avoid capture.

 

Many years ago one of my buddies out fished all of us with a fat floating bomber crawfish finish crankbait. In a tough highly pressured river he showed the trout something they wanted they had not seen before. He got 12 big brown trout in about two hours. That is the kind of lesson that tends to stay with you.

 

Will all tend to go with what we know has worked in the past. When those techniques don't work you need to think outside of the box. 

Thanks Jay,

I've seen those crayfish cranks (i.e. Rebel Teeny) a good bit and yes, I've seem them wind up snagged just as often.

Being new to fishing cranks, I wasn't familiar with the square bills designed for bass fishing that you mentioned. I poked around a bit. There's quite a few of these in crayfish colors and some look pretty lifelike.... to me, in the picture... which I know doesn't always correlate to getting bites.

They also look a bit big for most trout stream applications, though you seem to fish bigger water and obviously target big fish that would have no problem chomping those cranks. 

26 mins ago, Jay Blair said:

I have and the work great, especially on stocked trout and some holdover trout. I find the nymph with the small jig head and works for all trout; including wild trout.

My one problem with the dart heads is they don't have a keeper on the shank of the hook to keep the plastic from slipping down the hook toward the bend. Most of the small steelhead jig heads don't have a keeper and the hooks tend to be on the large size. I would love to use a tiny steelhead jig head with a sickle style hook, but they don't make what I want.

s-l500.jpg

 

 

The little Apex jig heads have a smaller hook and have a keeper on the shank for crappie plastics.

 

s-l640.jpg

Thanks, yes I do see what you mean. I've hear of people using glue of wrapping hook shank w/ thread to help hold soft baits. In this case you'd probably wind up replacing them so often that might not be practical. Plus, if this works off the shelf, why bother.

Thanks again Jay and friends!

JD

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Posted (edited)

JD, The smaller fat circuit board lip crankbaits in the 2-1/2 to 2-3/4" for smallmouths are about right for larger wild trout.

 

Stocked trout not so much.

 

This technique works for trout that have had time to adapt and feed on the natural prey items in their environment.

 

While fish are not very smart, they have a hardwire package honed by millions of years of evolutions so they can appear to be smart. One of those instincts seems to be built in energy cost benefit ratio.

 

Hard to get big chasing hundreds of little bugs when capturing one larger prey item gives you as much or more nutrition and calories. Even trout that live in very fertile environments that full of bugs and scuds like spring creeks will often go for a larger meal opportunity. 

 

About 15 years ago when I was trying to get my wife into fishing I booked a drift boat guide to take my wife and fishing on a famous scenic trout river. He was a fly guide that also took folks using conventional tackle according to his web site. I asked him how many fish his fly clients caught on a typical day and he said 1 or 2 trout and on a really good day 2-4 trout. We had high colored water conditions that are perfect for swinging streamer flies or jerk baits and my wife and each got about 20 trout over 19" on our 3-1/2' jerk baits. It was one of those fishing trips of a lifetime and I was thrilled, especially for my wife, but the fishing guide was not happy because we were catching too many of his fish. In the late afternoon there was a nice blue olive hatch and lots of rising trout and our guide lamented if only we were where fishing blue winged olives flies. I cast to one of those rising trout and it woofed a 3-1/2" rip bait and I told the guide your trout have no respect and they want a steak to go with their little bugs.

 

I never booked that guy again.

 

I grew up fly fishing and tied my own flies, but catching trout over 20" was a rare occurrence fly fishing. You have to go where big trout live and use larger lures to consistently catch trophy sized trout. I no longer have the patience to stand in the river for hours waiting for one small to medium sized fish to rise and reveal it feeding station and the larger wet flies, streamers, and Dahlberg Divers are not as effective as rip baits and crankbaits.

 

Been there - done that.

Edited by Jay Blair

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Good story Jay.  As anglers I think we are all guilty of telling the fish what they want instead of observing and thinking about what the fish wants.  On beach many avoid a Bunker chunk because they want the fish to eat a darker.

 

In the fresh I fish with a guy who only wants to use a prop bait ripped.  Even if I am killing them with a slow popper or sammy he keeps buzzing that prop at high speed.

 

To each his own but figuring it out is fun to me

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