bjelley

Best night time lures

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Just about any time of the season, if I can reach productive water with minnow style plugs, that what I'd be tossing. Bombers, Redfins, Mambos. Rarely, do stripers turn down a well presented minnow lure. You can add the 1 oz mag darter to the same list. 

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3 hours ago, Southcoastphil said:

Nice plugs, T!  Is the copper one a Lordship?

 

Back to the BM Blast--oh yes, it still sank, tail down.  The remaining lead was positioned at the very rear of the plug, so it casted very well too.  I expect that if one moved the remaining lead to the front section of the cavity it would sink at a less extreme angle, with some decrease in casting performance.

 

One of my winter projects will  be to play around with what I'll generically refer to as stubby rockets by testing the impact of several weights on sink rate x three weight locations (rear, center, front) in the weight cavity for aspect angle (assuming that I can talk my plug building mates into providing a half dozen blanks).

Yes the copper is a lordship, If you want to get that true stubby needlefish wiggle you have to put the tail weight below center.  That’s atleast what Habs and lordship did.  

 

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14 mins ago, t_man7 said:

Yes the copper is a lordship, If you want to get that true stubby needlefish wiggle you have to put the tail weight below center.  That’s atleast what Habs and lordship did.  

That is very good to know.  Thank you!

 

Couple of related questions:

 

Q1:  To get a better sense of the rear offset, what is the diameter of that Habs body and how far below the plug's center is the center of the weight cavity hole?

 

Q2:  Since I'll be rolling my own weights from lead sheets, could you please provide the dimensions and weight of the lead cylinder?

 

Q3:  This is a more generic question on vertical weight placement.  What's the impact of placing the weight along the centerline of a plug vs placing the same length and width of that weight at the bottom of that plug, with all other things remaining equal?

 

Here's a rough example: 

Centerline weight is one 1/4" diameter x 1.5" long lead cylinder with a 1/16" center hole for the through wire.  (I recognize that the hole would be slightly larger than that to accept a 1/16" diameter through wire, but it keeps the math simple for my example.)

 

vs.

 

Six holes evenly distributed along 1.5" in the bottom of the plug body, each of which accepts a 3/16" diameter x 1/4" tall lead cylinder.

 

Although qualitatively I can expect the latter to be more stable, I don't know if that delta stability makes a big difference, almost no difference, or somewhere in between in the action of the plug.  

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This season has shown me no love with needle, bucktail, darters, or real plugs. Had a ton of success with SP minnow and had my best catch of the year on a joe baggs swarter. I have fished 95% nights as I work 12-14 hour days. Colors - Blurple and Bone 

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2 hours ago, Southcoastphil said:

That is very good to know.  Thank you!

 

Couple of related questions:

 

Q1:  To get a better sense of the rear offset, what is the diameter of that Habs body and how far below the plug's center is the center of the weight cavity hole?

 

Q2:  Since I'll be rolling my own weights from lead sheets, could you please provide the dimensions and weight of the lead cylinder?

 

Q3:  This is a more generic question on vertical weight placement.  What's the impact of placing the weight along the centerline of a plug vs placing the same length and width of that weight at the bottom of that plug, with all other things remaining equal?

 

Here's a rough example: 

Centerline weight is one 1/4" diameter x 1.5" long lead cylinder with a 1/16" center hole for the through wire.  (I recognize that the hole would be slightly larger than that to accept a 1/16" diameter through wire, but it keeps the math simple for my example.)

 

vs.

 

Six holes evenly distributed along 1.5" in the bottom of the plug body, each of which accepts a 3/16" diameter x 1/4" tall lead cylinder.

 

Although qualitatively I can expect the latter to be more stable, I don't know if that delta stability makes a big difference, almost no difference, or somewhere in between in the action of the plug.  

Let’s take this to the lure building forum.  I made a post called “Needlefish Weighting”.

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The stubby needles mentioned above reminded me that the gibbs stubby needle has been my  long distance top water minnow in a sense for decades. It has a nice wiggle if you slow it down just right. You just have to work with the plug in the daytime to develop that proper retrieve. It  is a wonderful tool to have in the plug bag and it is largely overlooked these days. you can cover a ton of water with this little lure too.

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56 mins ago, redfin said:

The stubby needles mentioned above reminded me that the gibbs stubby needle has been my  long distance top water minnow in a sense for decades. It has a nice wiggle if you slow it down just right. You just have to work with the plug in the daytime to develop that proper retrieve. It  is a wonderful tool to have in the plug bag and it is largely overlooked these days. you can cover a ton of water with this little lure too.

The Hab’s stubby is another excellent plug

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