247fishing

Releasing striper

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How do you guy unhook a striper and releasing it?  Usually I just grab my leader and lift the line up and while it dangling in the air and unhook. I notice while the fish thrashing in the air the fish seem to tear it lips and such from the treble hook. Also I have accident hook my finger from the treble hook as well.  After unhooking the striper, I just toss it back into the water. Not sure if the fish will survive after or not. Any suggestions is welcome, thank you 

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I hate triple hooks,I get rid of them.As far as releasing the fish,you need to lay him down and hold him,you need to be more gentle,that would also help you Not getting hooked....push the hook up first,wingle it and gentle take it out.

   Me, I smash my barbs down so it is easier to release the fish,if a fish dies because I did something wrong I am sad..it does not happen anymore.

  It does take practice and care...believe I have released thousands  of fish.

  I also give thanks to Nature when I decide to keep and cook a fish.I wish I could think Nature more,LOL.

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I would consider getting a lipper/fish grip. When you pull the fish close, hold the rod off to the side with one hand and grip the fish's mouth with the lipper with your other hand. Now, if you hold the lipper tight, the fish can thrash, but its mouth/head can't move but an inch. Use your pliers or fingers to remove the hooks/lure. If done deliberately, it can be fast, and the fish stays mostly horizontal and in the water. IMO, the most important aspect is having a plan to release before you catch a fish.

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Before getting into the how, let's talk about what we're trying to avoid.  First, fish have a protective slime on them that helps protect them against parasites.  Over handling the fish removes this slime and puts them at risk.  Since striped bass don't have teeth, you can hold them by "lipping" them -- putting your thumb in their mouth and using their lower lip as a fulcrum against the rest of your hand.  However, one common mistake is to bend their mouth open.  This puts undue stress on their jaw and can cause harm.  As you can imagine, the fish is quite tired when it finally gets landed.  Fish need water moving over their gills to breathe and in order to move water over their gills, they need to swim.  If a fish is too tired to swim, it cannot get oxygen to get re-energized.  The fish will suffocate in the water.  Also, and this should be obvious, fish cannot breathe out of the water, so minimizing their time out of water is best.

 

Putting this all together, you want to bring the fish in, gently handle it to remove the hooks and then revive the fish in the water until it wants to swim away on its own.  You can invest in fish grips to help hold the fish and minimize slime removing contact.  You can use pliers to remove hooks so you don't hook yourself.  You can use single hooks or crush barbs to reduce the damage to the fish as you remove hooks.

 

When reviving a fish, you can bring it into the shallow water and gently set it down, grasp the back of the fish just in front of the tail and kind of push it through the water gently to move some water over its gills.  The fish will give a good shake and swim off when its ready.

 

You'll often see people talk about CPR (catch, photo, release).  This is literal.  It's not catch, hang out, photo, walk down the beach showing the fish off, reorganize your tackle box, sharpen your hooks, then release.  It's an expedited, catch, photo and release.  This will lead to healthier returns to the fishery so we can all catch 'em again.

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 I usually landed the  fish very fast less maybe 2 min or less. Whenever I toss them down the water they zoom out very fast, seem no fatigue at all, I am just concern about the thrashing  while they are in the air as I try to lip them, it is very hard to lip them when they thrash around like that. And when they do that, the treble twist around their lips,  making big hole and such, I am just concern if they will heal from such injury or not.  I will definitely will try to get a  fish grip or something that will help to lip them faster so they don’t swing around so much and causing  injury. Thank you 

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10 hours ago, 247fishing said:

 I usually landed the  fish very fast less maybe 2 min or less. Whenever I toss them down the water they zoom out very fast, seem no fatigue at all, I am just concern about the thrashing  while they are in the air as I try to lip them, it is very hard to lip them when they thrash around like that. And when they do that, the treble twist around their lips,  making big hole and such, I am just concern if they will heal from such injury or not.  I will definitely will try to get a  fish grip or something that will help to lip them faster so they don’t swing around so much and causing  injury. Thank you 

There's nothing wrong with dragging them up the sand and dehooking them without lifting them.  

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On 10/28/2020 at 7:40 AM, TedSki said:

There's nothing wrong with dragging them up the sand and dehooking them without lifting them.  

 

on the wet sand... not the dry sand that makes them look like they've been rolled in cornmeal and ready to fry. (we've seen too much of that on this forum)

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1 min ago, Uncle Stu said:

 

on the wet sand... not the dry sand that makes them look like they've been rolled in cornmeal and ready to fry. (we've seen too much of that on this forum)

Very good point!  Thanks for clarifying.

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10 hours ago, 247fishing said:

Thank you, i improved a lot on the release, fast unhook and back into the water

Good on you!  Congrats on your improvements!

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