BrianBM

Diesel history question, as regards tanks

7 posts in this topic

When was a 600-800 HP diesel engine, suitable for vehicle use, first produced in the United States?

 

In WW II, the only combatant nation to produce a tank with a diesel engine was the Soviet Union. The powerplant in the T-34 was a diesel, of about 600 HP. The US, the UK, Germany and Japan (AFAIK) all relied on gasoline engines, with their inherently greater vulnerability to fire. It seems odd to me that the Soviets, not a nation with a technology base comparable to us or the Brits, should have been first to recognize the latent superiority of a low-profile diesel. 

 

One source - I forget where I read this - claims that Hitler wanted diesels, but was talked out of insisting on it by Maybach engineers. Perhaps so ...

 

The Abrams has a 1500 HP gas turbine, it's basically the same turbine as is used in the Huey. The Army has looked several times at replacements, both newer turbines and a diesel, but the matter apparently wasn't considered compelling enough to spend the money.

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Ecks, Moocks, thank you.

 

So, the Army preferred gasoline powered tanks for logistics commonality. Very interesting.

Edited by BrianBM

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Moocks, thanks for that link.

My Grandfather worked at B.F. Goodrich in Akron, Ohio during the war, and I wish I could remember his stories about the experience.I know he had some kind of Patent involving the lubrication of some kind of machine parts. From the article your link led to, it looks like they were involved in the cutting edge technology of the day.

 

B.F. Goodrich in World War Two
Akron, OH
1870-Present (Now Goodrich based in Charlotte, NC)

This page updated 6-20-2019.

Goodrich started business in 1870 when founded by Dr. Benjamin Franklin Goodrich in Akron, OH.  In the beginning its main product line was rubber hoses for fire departments.  In 1903 Henry Ford chose B.F. Goodrich to supply tires for its Model T Ford.  In 1965 B.F. Goodrich invented the radial tire, but 23 years later ended up selling its tire making business to Michelin.  Today Goodrich is an aerospace company.

Here is a picture of the plant back in the day:


A period postcard rendering of the former B.F. Goodrich complex in downtown Akron, OH. 


B.F. Goodrich's Akron, OH Plant won the Army-Navy "E" Award two times during WWII.
B.F. Goodrich's Los Angels, CA Plant won the Army-Navy "E" Award two times during WWII.
B.F. Goodrich's Niagara Falls, NY Plant won the Army-Navy "E" Award five times during WWII.
B.F. Goodrich's Oaks, PA Plant won the Army-Navy "E" Award three times during WWII.
B.F. Goodrich's Clarksville, TN Plant won the Army-Navy "E" Award five times during WWII.

 

B.F. Goodrich World War Two Products: 

The company was the first to develop synthetic rubber and operated one synthetic rubber plant in Akron, OH during the war.  It also manufactured military truck tires, aircraft tires, gas masks, aircraft de-icing boots, self-sealing fuel tanks, armored vehicle tracks, rubber cargo rafts for the navy, and landing craft bearings.  It had over 50 aviation products that included use in the B-17, B-25, B-26, B-29  TBMs all had Goodich equipment.

B.F. Goodrich was 67th in dollar value of WWII production contracts.

 

 

BFG plant Akron.jpg

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On 10/12/2020 at 5:21 PM, BrianBM said:

Impressive.

 

WW II is one of those vast subjects that no one can really know in great detail.

 

Literally everyone alive at the time was affected by the war.

Here in the US, goods were rationed, and your job was likely to have adapted to support the war effort in some way. In a way, the war was millions of individuals stories. Everyone pitched in to help the cause. It was a much different time.

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