Sudsy

8 weight rod - Why should I keep it ?

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60 posts in this topic

14 hours ago, Drew C. said:

I would look at keeping it for  another rigging option - you need. Floater, then grab A, intermediate, then grab B, fast Sink grab the other one. 

This would work well in a boat but, from experience, not so well on a beach unless you're staying in one spot.

 

An 8 weight was the rod I started with saltwater fishing for stripers (it was also my favorite rod weight for Atlantic salmon fishing except in early season when I would use a 10 weight) and I would still be using it except for shoulder problems. I now fish TH, actually using a 10w SH rod converted into a TH. 

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Im just the opposite,Sudsy.I fish an 8wt almost exclusively in FW & SW and my 7&9 wt rods stay home.Its the best all around wt rod for most situations and covers more bases than any other rod,IMO.Before you let it go,fish it and see if it fits your needs.

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1 hour ago, Kml said:

If it is two piece sell it. When you are prepping for the Bahamas trip go get a modern 4 piece rod. 

 

3 piece

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5 hours ago, Nikoli said:

I have always gone the even rod weight route. 6,8,10,12 this covers nearly everything you can catch in saltwater with a fly

What the man says.

Everything good quality 4 pieces.

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On 10/10/2020 at 6:05 PM, snapper1 said:

What the man says.

Everything good quality 4 pieces.

Same here. 4,6,8, and 10.  My go to in the salt is an 8,  T and T at ten foot long. I use a 9 foot ten weight when It is nasty or 400 grain quick sinking line is needed in fast deep current. My line of thinking is that the eight weight is specialized, at ten foot long on one backcast clears the sand behind me at dropping tide from the surf. The extra length helps. I do have a sage 8 weight at 9 foot long, and can tell the difference on the beach. The ten foot long 8 weight is much better and used most often.

Edited by yarddog59

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3 hours ago, yarddog59 said:

Same here. 4,6,8, and 10.  My go to in the salt is an 8,  T and T at ten foot long. I use a 9 foot ten weight when It is nasty or 400 grain quick sinking line is needed in fast deep current. My line of thinking is that the eight weight is specialized, at ten foot long on one backcast clears the sand behind me at dropping tide from the surf. The extra length helps. I do have a sage 8 weight at 9 foot long, and can tell the difference on the beach. The ten foot long 8 weight is much better and used most often.

10’ 8w on the beach works the best also for me 

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On 10/10/2020 at 3:28 PM, Hook I said:

Brother Sudsy ever play golf with only a putter, sand wedge and a 6 iron ? :rav:

LOL, almost-  putter, pitching wedge, 5 iron, and 3 wood.

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3 hours ago, yarddog59 said:

Same here. 4,6,8, and 10.  My go to in the salt is an 8,  T and T at ten foot long. I use a 9 foot ten weight when It is nasty or 400 grain quick sinking line is needed in fast deep current. My line of thinking is that the eight weight is specialized, at ten foot long on one backcast clears the sand behind me at dropping tide from the surf. The extra length helps. I do have a sage 8 weight at 9 foot long, and can tell the difference on the beach. The ten foot long 8 weight is much better and used most often.

Also 4, 6, 8 an 10 weights for except for a lovely 5w 7' Hardy Hollokona bamboo rod that was gifted to me and a TH rod bought a few years ago (rated as an 8w Spey). And all 2 pieces except for the TH (which is all right if you don't fly commercially to go fishing).

 

But I'm curious: why do you think that an 8w rod is "specialized"? Or maybe you're referring specifically to an 8w 10 footer but even then? 

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7 mins ago, Suave said:

Also 4, 6, 8 an 10 weights for except for a lovely 5w 7' Hardy Hollokona bamboo rod that was gifted to me and a TH rod bought a few years ago (rated as an 8w Spey). And all 2 pieces except for the TH (which is all right if you don't fly commercially to go fishing).

 

But I'm curious: why do you think that an 8w rod is "specialized"? Or maybe you're referring specifically to an 8w 10 footer but even then? 

Yes! I was referring to the longer 10 foot length. The nine foot length 8 weight is more than adequate in rivers lakes and calm surf, but the 10 foot is perfect for mending over waist high or higher swell to avoid your fly line belly from being pushed shore bound by incoming waves, and as mentioned earlier, getting above the sand at low tide, when the shoreline is angled upwards six foot behind me.

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On 10/8/2020 at 6:25 PM, slip n slide said:

An 8 is my go-to for SW,a 9 or 10 f it's gets snotty or I'm throwing big

I am the same. 

Not that I catch all that many big fish, I'm not that good a fisherman :o , but I am yet to be under-gunned with the 8WT. The 10 comes out in windy or big fly conditions. 

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