Capt.Castafly

Albie Fishing in the Balance

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As we all know life's a balance whether it is work or family.

There's enough stuff always going on to juggle our time when life demands it.

But what about leisure time fishing for albies? Should we have to balance our time there?

These guys have to not only balance there time, but every second they fly fish off their boards.

More power to them. It's only for the young at heart.

I can't imagine me getting a wheel chair bolted to a board and fish.  

I bet several people here know these men?

Click on the link below.

 

 

Paddle_Board.wmv

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3 hours ago, Capt.Castafly said:

As we all know life's a balance whether it is work or family.

There's enough stuff always going on to juggle our time when life demands it.

But what about leisure time fishing for albies? Should we have to balance our time there?

These guys have to not only balance there time, but every second they fly fish off their boards.

More power to them. It's only for the young at heart.

I can't imagine me getting a wheel chair bolted to a board and fish.  

I bet several people here know these men?

Click on the link below.

 

 

Paddle_Board.wmv

Link is broken for me, but curious to see since I’m a SUP fisherman myself 

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10 mins ago, BosFlyfishing said:

Link is broken for me, but curious to see since I’m a SUP fisherman myself 

It is a windows media file it won't play for me on my ipad or chromebook. 

Odd but really the best way to post a video is to upload it to YouTube and paste the link here.

I just got a paddle board last week so I am curious as well.

 

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I get a notice in Vimeo "Sorry, we couldn't find that page" on my chromebook.  Problem may be on my end, though, as I know sometimes the chromebook is a bit "different".

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Guy on the SUP looked pretty cool and collected. Not too sure about the kid without the PFD that just seems super irresponsible, also his yak looked loaded and hes got his gopro on..... prob just an influencer influencing lol

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Thanks for sharing the video .. 

I too enjoy the challenge of fly casting from SUP .. although I've yet to encounter Albies from my SUP at present. 

I'm quite certain the gentleman on the "BOTE" sup is Peter Laurelli - He has some great content on YouTube 

 

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For those who cannot see the OP, it's a guy on a paddle board landing and releasing an Albie among several boats in a mild swell. Then a second fisherman is shown in a kayak fishing without a PFD which prompted my comment. It does look like a really cool experience, I just hope everyone stays safe out there. 

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Hey - Yes, that's me on the Bote SUP.

 

I've learned a lot of lessons on how to be offshore and in control.

1) Keep it simple.

That means one rod and one bag to hold anything needed.

2) Control what you can.

That means control the rod and control the board. Rod control means keeping it away from the water, which is what the chair on the bow does, keeping the rod tip well above any sweep from water/waves. Control the board is done by either an anchor or a drift sock. The anchor is attached via a bungee to the bow and the drift sock is attached to the stern via another bungee.

 

There's a lot of other nuances and details in how I plan, what I prefer to bring and how I'll manage a day, but for all of that the key is knowing the location and especially knowing the weather and tides beforehand.

 

The most frustrating thing for me on the water are self-centered boaters. This video from the Capt. was during a time when there was intermittent fog that kept everyone still, drifting and generally playing well. It was a pleasure to be out there, even though for me it was tense with the fog. When the fog lifted, more boats came out and there were a few bad actors that killed the vibe of the morning.

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21 mins ago, Ambergris said:

Hey - Yes, that's me on the Bote SUP.

 

I've learned a lot of lessons on how to be offshore and in control.

1) Keep it simple.

That means one rod and one bag to hold anything needed.

2) Control what you can.

That means control the rod and control the board. Rod control means keeping it away from the water, which is what the chair on the bow does, keeping the rod tip well above any sweep from water/waves. Control the board is done by either an anchor or a drift sock. The anchor is attached via a bungee to the bow and the drift sock is attached to the stern via another bungee.

 

There's a lot of other nuances and details in how I plan, what I prefer to bring and how I'll manage a day, but for all of that the key is knowing the location and especially knowing the weather and tides beforehand.

 

The most frustrating thing for me on the water are self-centered boaters. This video from the Capt. was during a time when there was intermittent fog that kept everyone still, drifting and generally playing well. It was a pleasure to be out there, even though for me it was tense with the fog. When the fog lifted, more boats came out and there were a few bad actors that killed the vibe of the morning.

How much line do you carry for your bow anchor?  What type anchor .. kayak?

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Anchor is normally a 15lb kettle ball with 100ft of nylon cord. I've never been moved or pushed with that weight and the handle makes handling it pretty easy...BUT...yesterday launching from the beach was very hard given the size of the swell and the gradual slope of the beach. My first attempt to get out was a failure and in the process I lost my anchor. That was a first for me and if the forecast was for a windy day, I would have turned around and bought another anchor before going out. Luckily, the drift sock was enough to keep me in control after hooking up.

 

Unfortunately with COVID and gyms being closed, kettle balls are apparently difficult to come by, so I bought a 10lb mushroom anchor. It should be enough, but I'll find out shortly.

 

Another key with the anchor is to have the bungee as a shock absorber for waves so the full weight of going up and down isn't felt by the anchor.

Edited by Ambergris

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Dear Ray and Peter,

 

It an awesome experience to get to share yesterday's fishing with both of you. Ray, it was fantastic to see both of your clients double up after all their efforts spent casting, and thank you for your kind words. Peter, it was a privilege to observe your approach to this fishing, and thank you for the advice/reminder you gave me early on in the morning. I'm sorry to hear that you lost your anchor on the beach! I launched off the same beach, and aside from taking a few waves over the bow, it went pretty smoothly. It took me a few minutes to find and reach the spot with the least severe slope and longest period between swells, and even so, I don't want to think about doing that launch in a SUP. 

 

To all,

 

A few words regarding the safety concerns that some have expressed. First, I appreciate your concerns, and I hope I can assure you that I have taken appropriate measures and preparations to reach the point that a lifejacket capable of aiding me in a situation in which I have completely lost control would restrict my movements enough that it would hinder my ability to do what I need to do to keep any situation from arising. There is much more than meets the eye to what I do than what short clip that Capt. Ray shared shows, and I hope that, after sharing about some of the precautions I take, there will be less doubt regarding safety.

 

First, I have pushed my limits and practiced safety procedures in much more trying conditions than those we experienced yesterday. The first thing I did when I bought my kayak several years ago was to practice swimming, paddling, navigating waves, standing on, and re-entering my kayak in conditions ranging from flat calm to small craft advisory-worthy. Therefore, barring any injury to me that would incapacitate me partially to completely, I have no doubts that I could prevent, and in the worst case scenario, extract myself from a dangerous situation that does not involve other people. 

 

The last point is important. The greatest fears I have on the water aren't wind, waves, or current, or even seals, sharks, and whales getting a bit too close for comfort—I've experienced all of those before in the kayak, sometimes in tandem—but other boaters; negligent, intoxicated, and/or even hostile. As a measure against the first two, I always keep my head on a swivel and ears open for any engine sounds, especially in the fog like that which we had yesterday. Fortunately, most people have the sense to navigate slowly in the fog, but I recently had several experiences in the fog to remind me of the universal law that, in a room a 10 boat operators, one's bound to be an a**hole. As a defense against the last kind of boat operator, I do the same, but there really isn't much I can do in my kayak, or any paddle craft for that matter, if a person in a vessel under power intends to run me over for the purpose of doing harm or separate me from my gear in order to steal it. For that reason, I always keep my waterproof phone and a waterproof radio with an emergency SOS function on my person at all times. Being hit by a boat and being incapacitated is the only situation that I can imagine a Type I or Type II PFD would aid in saving my life, but I wouldn't be able to react to that kind of situation nearly as well if I wore one of those at all times. I wouldn't be able to paddle away toward shore, if I were close enough, and reaching around for my whistle or radio would be that much more cumbersome.  

 

Second, I, like Peter and any others of us who like to "push the limits" that others perceive, don't like to push my/our personal limits, which I/we know very well from experience (disclaimer: I don't intent to speak on behalf of Peter or anybody else, but based on his and others' writings, I gather that all of us take at least that consideration of safety fairly similarly). There are plenty of days that I know, either by looking at a forecast, tide/current chart, or the beach where I intend to launch, I wouldn't feel safe in. So I don't go. I fish from shore or make arrangements to fish from a vessel in which I would be comfortable in if I think it would be worth it to do so. If I can't feel safe at all times barring, like I said before, unforeseeable human factors, then I won't go. I just isn't worth it. While my comfort zone may push what others consider their limits and therefore make my actions appear unreasonable, that kind of projection isn't necessarily correct in many instances.

 

Case in point: there are many respectable sports—free soloing, skydiving, freediving, among others—that seem insane to most who haven't even considered the incredible extensivity of precautions and preparation that go into them. Nonetheless, these are the same people who send their kids off to football and soccer practice multiple times per week—two of the most common sports with two of the highest concussion rates in all of sports. Go figure.

 

Here's a clip in which I ended up in the rip at Nobska last week after hooking an albie. As you can see, I was standing up some of the time, but I felt that it was starting to approach my limits, so I sat down in my seat for most of the fight. In the clip, the seat is in the higher of two positions, about 12" above the deck. I only drop down to the lower position (7" lower) if I need to paddle long, hard, or when launching and landing. I have never experienced conditions while fishing I couldn't handle in the higher of the two positions very comfortably. 

 

 

With that out of the way, I hope to alleviate a couple of individuals' concerns.

 

On 9/29/2020 at 4:27 PM, Gilbey said:

Even crazier being out there without a PFD. 

 

Alan 

8 hours ago, Gilbey said:

Then a second fisherman is shown in a kayak fishing without a PFD which prompted my comment. It does look like a really cool experience, I just hope everyone stays safe out there. 

 

Alan,

 

I wouldn't say it's crazy. All things considered, I'm not in much of a greater danger than other boaters out there, the difference being that some boaters sometimes like to run and gun on full plane with one or two guys leaning over the bow, ready to cast, without any PFDs on. Now that—that is approaching crazy in some cases. Also, getting back into a boat is a lot harder than getting back into a kayak, from my experience. 

 

Also, if you look closely, I have my blue PFD strapped to the back of the milk crate, which is reasonably accessible to me if I need to put it on as a preventative measure, although I've never needed to do this before. 

 

9 hours ago, RyanJ_88 said:

Guy on the SUP looked pretty cool and collected. Not too sure about the kid without the PFD that just seems super irresponsible, also his yak looked loaded and hes got his gopro on..... prob just an influencer influencing lol

 

Ryan,

 

I watched Peter for a bit of the time we were both out there, and I never saw him once lose his cool, even with albies flying out of the water right in front of him. He's definitely a role model to me and, hopefully, to other folks out there.

 

Now about that "super irresponsible kid in the kayak." First, I just want to make clear that I understand why you might think that, and that I don't take any offense to that criticism. Criticisms are good and often keep me in check. I hope my explanations above have satisfactorily eased your concerns. If not, I'd be glad to answer any other questions you may have regarding what I do. 

 

I wouldn't really consider my yak "loaded" by any means. I definitely carry more equipment than Peter, for instance, but my kayak allows the capability to do so. Field & Stream Shadow Caster 123. 12'3" LOA, 36" beam. Weighs a little over 100lbs unloaded and has a capacity of 450lbs. I'm 5'7", 160 lb soaking wet, and have decent athletic abilities and acumen (former swimmer, gymnast, martial artist, etc). My gear totals to about 40 pounds, which leaves me with 250lbs of capacity to spare. The gear always includes the paddle, kayak wheels (I can land it anywhere, anytime), PFD, my anchor setup, radio, whistle, and a milk crate storage setup I built with a space for the GoPro monopod and three rods. On this day, I also had (in no particular order) a spinning rod, a fly rods, a box of flies, a box of albie lures, my stripping basket, 3 bottles of water, granola/certeal bars, sunscreen, pliers, an extra-long Baker dehooker, braid scissors, measuring tape, Fish Grip Jr, stringer, some leader material, and binoculars. Everything I carry is not only designed to get wet, but it does every single trip. I carry what I consider the essentials and not too much else. 

 

As you noted, I also generally run a GoPro (Hero 5 Black with a broken LCD display) and a Pelican case with enough batteries and SD cards to film as long as I need to. That said, the camera and batteries are starting to deteriorate from the salt after three years of service and are borderline unusable, so I may need to upgrade soon.

 

However, you are wrong about why I film what I do, and if I'm honest, it kind of pisses me off that you decided to group me with a bunch of attention-seeking know-it-alls who spread misinformation and ruin fisheries for those who created them. I recently ended up on the water next a boat of anglers whose combined subscriber count tops 2.7 million, and guess what? With nobody else around for at least a mile and albie pods stretching for hundreds of yards to the north, they ran the exact pod I was working destroyed the peace of the morning. It sucked. But hey, they got hundreds of thousands of views doing it, so I guess that's what matters, right?

 

Also, I'm an influencer? Try to find me online. I haven't been active on social media for years, and I've never used it to try to make money or gain a following. The vast majority of the dozens of videos on my YouTube channel are private because I only share them with friends and family. Why do I do that? Because I love sharing my experiences with people who might not necessarily have the same abilities to experience them themselves. My family gets to see a part of my life that they would never otherwise understand, and my friends who fish get a huge kick out of some of my clips. I also record for myself, and if I'm honest, there have been some days in the winter that clips by which I remember what I'm passionate about have pulled me out of psychological slumps. So, yeah—I have a GoPro, which makes just another dime a dozen influencer. I appreciate the love, brother. 

 

I attempted to create a short film several years ago after having been inspired by Peter's work years before, and I never followed through with my project. The amount of work and dedication it takes is immense—more than I had in me at the time. I still have the fire inside of me, and I may channel it into a short film one of these winters if I can find the time between college and work, but until then, I'll keep collecting clips over the courses of seasons to make sure that I can show exactly what I want to show on video when I can.

 

For now, though, I just hope everybody here gets a kick out of these clips I shot yesterday. I have quite a few more hookups and lands on video, but these were among the best for various reasons that appeal to me visually and emotionally:

 

 

 

 

Ray,

 

I hope I didn't derail your thread—I just felt obligated to clear up some confusion regarding what I do and don't do in the kayak. With all that out of the way, thank you for the clip you posted :howdy:!  It's not often I get to see the kayak from the third person point of view in the water.

 

Also, as Peter mentioned, thank you for being a role model for other boat operators on the water. If everybody drove and drifted around other vessels the way you do, everybody would have that much of a better time on the water. 

 

Best regards and tight lines,

Dan

Edited by DanTheBassMan

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