Krill

Report Your Ocean Sunfish Sightings

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Hello. I am a marine biologist with the New England Coastal Wildlife Alliance (NECWA), an all-volunteer nonprofit based in southeastern MA. We established a community-sighting network for basking sharks and ocean sunfish in 2005 called NEBShark. We are asking fishermen, recreational boaters and beach walkers to report their sightings of both live and dead ocean sunfish and basking sharks to this network with the focus of better understanding these very unusual species in the waters of New England. We ask for basic sighting information when reporting to www.nebshark.org including: the date, time, general location, GPS position and photographs/video (if collected).  

 

Each fall, NECWA also works hard to rescue live ocean sunfish that strand along the shores of New England. As an all-volunteer group, we are always looking for help with these endeavors as all of us associated with NECWA are volunteering our time and efforts. If the animal strands dead, then we switch gears and conduct a necropsy or animal autopsy. We collect photographs of the carcass along with body measurements, weights, external and internal parasites and tissues. We are using this material to support our research as well as that of other researchers in the United States and worldwide. 

 

To learn more or to report your sighting today, go to www.nebshark.org. To learn more about NECWA, go to www.necwa.org.

 

Thank you for your time and support. 

Best, Krill 

Carol "Krill" Carson

Marine Biologist and President, NECWA

krillcarson@mac.com

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Funnily enough, I saw one today while kayaking. I searched "ocean sunfish" to see if anyone else saw them much. I was off Cape Ann about halfway between Loblolly Point and Thacher Island's North Tower Lighthouse. It was probably about four feet long. It was alive and basking, although it had a couple substantial wounds on its head. 

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Beautiful photos. Those wounds are caused by external parasites and most ocean sunfish have those areas on the head, forward of the dorsal fin and near the anal vent. From what I can tell, all very natural. Now of course, ocean sunfish also show evidence of getting hit by boats but the ones in your photos look like wounds from parasites. 

 

Can you go to www.nebshark.org and report this sighting so that the information is automatically registered into our database? If you don't have a latitude and longitude, you can use Google Earth to find the general location of the fish. Thank you so much and I hope you see many more :  )

 

Best, Krill 

508-369-8303

krillcarson@mac.com

www.nebshark.org

www.necwa.org

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On 9/26/2020 at 8:26 PM, Krill said:

Hello. I am a marine biologist with the New England Coastal Wildlife Alliance (NECWA), an all-volunteer nonprofit based in southeastern MA. We established a community-sighting network for basking sharks and ocean sunfish in 2005 called NEBShark. We are asking fishermen, recreational boaters and beach walkers to report their sightings of both live and dead ocean sunfish and basking sharks to this network with the focus of better understanding these very unusual species in the waters of New England. We ask for basic sighting information when reporting to www.nebshark.org including: the date, time, general location, GPS position and photographs/video (if collected).  

 

Each fall, NECWA also works hard to rescue live ocean sunfish that strand along the shores of New England. As an all-volunteer group, we are always looking for help with these endeavors as all of us associated with NECWA are volunteering our time and efforts. If the animal strands dead, then we switch gears and conduct a necropsy or animal autopsy. We collect photographs of the carcass along with body measurements, weights, external and internal parasites and tissues. We are using this material to support our research as well as that of other researchers in the United States and worldwide. 

 

To learn more or to report your sighting today, go to www.nebshark.org. To learn more about NECWA, go to www.necwa.org.

 

Thank you for your time and support. 

Best, Krill 

Carol "Krill" Carson

Marine Biologist and President, NECWA

krillcarson@mac.com

Hi @Krill,

 

You probably know me better as the owner of Siena at HSM.  Good to see you here and thanks for all the work you do regarding marine biology.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

36 mins ago, jason colby said:

Don't you want turtle info as well? Or is that someone else?

Yeah I was wondering if Krill would ask about the terrapin. 

I'm curious about rumors of turtle heads poking up in north shore marshes.

Separate thread?

Edited by Milky

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9 mins ago, Milky said:

Yeah I was wondering if Krill would ask about the terrapin. 

I'm curious about rumors of turtle heads poking up in north shore marshes.

Separate thread?

I'm pretty sure she was doing some terrapin studies in the Wareham area this year but I speak to so many biologists (and I'm getting old-nothing like Carl though) so I'm not sure...

I would start off with thinking "North Shore Marshes" would be a bit of a hike for her but on the other hand, Krill is everywhere!

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9 mins ago, jason colby said:

I'm pretty sure she was doing some terrapin studies in the Wareham area this year but I speak to so many biologists (and I'm getting old-nothing like Carl though) so I'm not sure...

I would start off with thinking "North Shore Marshes" would be a bit of a hike for her but on the other hand, Krill is everywhere!

Terrapin on the north shore would be big news in the turtle loving world and science. Probably be a range extension. 

I'm definitely not saying they are there. I have not seen any. Just a rumor. 

 

I do know the Buddhists have been accused of buying terrapin in NYC fish markets and releasing them alive in various places. That coupled with warmer than usual water, ya never know...

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7 hours ago, Krill said:

Beautiful photos. Those wounds are caused by external parasites and most ocean sunfish have those areas on the head, forward of the dorsal fin and near the anal vent. From what I can tell, all very natural. Now of course, ocean sunfish also show evidence of getting hit by boats but the ones in your photos look like wounds from parasites. 

 

Can you go to www.nebshark.org and report this sighting so that the information is automatically registered into our database? If you don't have a latitude and longitude, you can use Google Earth to find the general location of the fish. Thank you so much and I hope you see many more :  )

 

Best, Krill 

508-369-8303

krillcarson@mac.com

www.nebshark.org

www.necwa.org

Krill, thank you for your work.  I have a question on Krill.  Up till 2003 I use to see loads of Krill in the cape ann region. Same with Rhode Island up till 2007.  Now?  These areas inshore appear to be void of Krill.  Any reason? 

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7 hours ago, Milky said:

Terrapin on the north shore would be big news in the turtle loving world and science. Probably be a range extension. 

I'm definitely not saying they are there. I have not seen any. Just a rumor. 

 

I do know the Buddhists have been accused of buying terrapin in NYC fish markets and releasing them alive in various places. That coupled with warmer than usual water, ya never know...

that would be a good thing, IMO.

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Was on sandy neck beach on Saturday.  Saw plenty of sunfish breaching.   Significant number.  Pretty sure they we’re sunfish.   About 1/8 mile from beach during high tide Saturday am.  

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