BrianBM

Beer Can Duck

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I have a widget like a slender funnel, with a wide, upturned base , almost soup plate size. I'll stick a chicken on it later. I might, or might not, bother saving the chicken fat, and saute veggies in them, some other time.

 

What about duck? The very few times I've fried something briefly in duck fat, there's a richness to it that I like. It occurs to me that using the gadget on a duck would be a neat way to collect a supply, and anyway, I like duck a lot.  Do we have any beer can duck buffs here to comment?

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I suppose it would work, and likely quite well. But please do not overcook that duck, pink/rosy meat is they way duck is best. (And no, there are no salmonella issues with duck)

 

And yes, I save duck fat all the time to cook with, it is like gold.

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Duck fat is da bomb! I always save what renders off when I make a seared duck breast. I almost always have a container of duck fat and another of bacon fat in my freezer.

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Crispy is what I had in mind .... but it's hiding.  Bride must've moved it.  So today's bird got spatchcocked and will be grilled in a more familiar fashion. 

2 hours ago, Steve in Mass said:

I suppose it would work, and likely quite well. But please do not overcook that duck, pink/rosy meat is they way duck is best. (And no, there are no salmonella issues with duck)

 

And yes, I save duck fat all the time to cook with, it is like gold.

A rare but happy moment when we are in cheery agreement.   :)

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Never thought of a beer can duck but I like it.  You should be able to get the thighs cooked without overcooking the breasts.  Surprised wife hasn’t brought one home lately.  She buys them for the fat and we used the last a month ago.  
If the widgets gone drink some Fosters.  ;-)

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I won't use beer, and probably not any fluid at all. Dry the bird, let it sit for a day with a dry rub (mostly pepper; I love my black pepper) and then get it crispy.  I love crispy skin on any fowl.

Seabass, salmon and porgies, too, but get their skins not to stick to the grill is nigh-on impossible.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

15 mins ago, BrianBM said:

with a dry rub (mostly pepper; I love my black pepper) and then get it crispy.  I love crispy skin on any fowl.

I find for some reason garlic powder helps in getting fowl skin crispy. and Also some salt if you can tolerate it.

 

Just yesterday I had some skin from left over roast chicken (which when stored and fridged, gets kind of "flabby"), laid it on a shallow pan, sprinkled with salt and garlic powder, and 15 minutes in a 350 oven I had skin from heaven, like a poultry potato chip. :drool:

 

Edited by Steve in Mass

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Never tried it. I usually score a plucked duck breast (Mallard or black), season with cilantro/lime/salt and sear medium rare. Their legs/thighs get dry rubbed and smoked. Teal and woodies get plucked and roasted whole. Scaup and longtails go into the grind bag for kielbasa or snack sticks. 

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I don't doubt you, but I don't hunt and have no partyboat tuna to offer in a friendly swap. (I could do baklava. I'm good at that.) It'll be a gen-u-wine Long Island duck for my first shot.

 

 

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