worldsworstangler

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I started a fishing log this season: Wondering if I can fish all the beaches over a 4 mile stretch, or if it’s more useful to move around a bit. Walking the same beach 10 times in row is boring if you aren’t catching fish. I’m sure fishing the same beach is MORE useful, but I’m wondering if you guys are strict about it...

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Firstly fish the tides, water temp, sun has affects in some areas.,look for bait or other successful anglers. But if you did all above to no avail, It’s you , JUST kidding, Structure, rips, and estuaries always produce, along with beaches under certain situations, Slow your retrieve your feel bottom or speed up. Most likely your just an hour of good paying attention to others and times. And old saying: “Fish at the fishes convenience, not your”

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First you have to see if the area holds bait. Some bottom does not hold anything at all, not even seaweed grows there. Then there might not be fish hanging around at all.

 

Also other mentioned, there might be times during different season that fish will swim by there. On a hot summer day, fish tends to stay off hot waters. They might come around after night time when water is cool. Same in seasons, might be there during spring or fall, but not summer. You have to think like the fish, "why would I be here if it's hot?". 

 

Find structures that holds seaweed, which holds bait, which will hold fish etc. Inlets and outlets pushes bait fish in/out. Fish those area as fish are lazy and will take a easy meal if presented. 

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1 hour ago, hobobob said:

4 miles of beach = 1 location. 

Made a few typos, also should have noted it’s not one continuous beach. Intermittent beaches, causeways, rivers  over a 4 mile stretch of coastline. Still count as 1 location???

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Thanks all for the responses, I guess what I’m getting at is this: 

 

There is one beach where I have caught fish at different times throughout the year. In my mind, if I were making a fishing log (tide, wind, sweep, sun, moon phase etc), fishing this one beach only, could provide a great log (for that one beach). Fishing the estuary 3 miles northeast may provide some information for a certain day/time/tide etc, but it’s a bit difficult to be fishing two places at once in order to collect multiple data sets. 
 

 

So I guess what I’m asking is, does it make more sense to fish one beach only, or fish anywhere along the coastline and worry less about where the data is collected?

Edited by worldsworstangler

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You are fishing to catch, not capture the most reliable data. Do you have a way to determine which area has the most potential? If you know a spot produces well then I would stick to that one area and learn it well. If you have no clue then you should move around until you can determine what spots might produce better and you'll have some options. There are enough variabilities that you won't be able to capture a magic formula-except the more you do it the patterns of when to focus one particular area will become more clear to you. 

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Once you learn an area you will be able to predict when you "should" find fish there.

 

Lots of us run and gun.  Some spots you can take one look and know that nothing is there.  Mostly has to do with bait and tide stage

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It's true that it can take quite a while to learn a relatively small stretch of beach.  Learning how fish relate to time, tide, bait, water temperature, water quality, nuances of bottom structure, etc.--and how that differs throughout the seasons--can take quite a while.  Just taking one example from my local area--Robert Moses Park--you've got the ocean beach, which doesn't fish the same way at Field 5 and it does closer to the jetty, Democrat Point, the backside of the inlet, including the old construction dock, the bay backside extending to and past the Lighthouse, etc.  All of those places can respond differently at different times, and certainly at different seasons.  For example, in the spring, on outgoing tide in the evening, the brings sun-warmed water out of the bay, can trigger a bite, while in mid-summner, even for fish such as fluke, you normally do better when an incoming tide brings cooler, clearer ocean water into the inlet and lower bay, displacing the hot, murky bay water.  You can fish a place like that all season and stioll not learn it all.

 

On the other hand, fish migrate, and particularly when populations of bass and blues are low, as they are now, stretches of potentially good fishing water can be nearly barren, just because there aren't enough fish around to fill in all the blanks.  So if one area is unproductive, it makes sense to make a move to somewhere else where conditions are favorable.  Particularly in spring and fall, you can often predict where the migration is peaking, and fish in what should be the most productive sections of the Island.

 

I do 98% of my fishing from a boat, largely because I find that the mobility it gives me is important (and also because I get a little cranky when people get too close, and don't enjoy worrying about somebody crowding my spot on the shore).  But the principles remain the same--I'm often fishing the same water that a surfcaster would be casting to (although if the surfcaster is there, I'll go elsewhere so I don't get in his way).  The truth is that the learning never stops, because just when you think you have things worked out, a new storm passes by, changes the bottom, and you have to learn new things again.

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I live in NJ. Back in the day when SI. NY. tolls where only $6-8 dollars during non rush hour I learned Staten Island NY. as good or better than NJ. This dose not happen over night. It take years before everything falls into place. Instead of fishing 12 hours, you will more than likely dial it into 4

 

If you really want to get a sneak peak of a area, NOAA fishing charts can point you into some productive water. During off season, the month February I would be on the Island taking long shore line walks at low tide. At low tide a location can tell you a lot about what is going on in the area. You want to be there early when it's running out as well as coming in to see how things set up. 

 

Good luck and tight lines

Lou T

Edited by Lou T

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21 hours ago, worldsworstangler said:

Thanks all for the responses, I guess what I’m getting at is this: 

 

There is one beach where I have caught fish at different times throughout the year. In my mind, if I were making a fishing log (tide, wind, sweep, sun, moon phase etc), fishing this one beach only, could provide a great log (for that one beach). Fishing the estuary 3 miles northeast may provide some information for a certain day/time/tide etc, but it’s a bit difficult to be fishing two places at once in order to collect multiple data sets. 
 

 

So I guess what I’m asking is, does it make more sense to fish one beach only, or fish anywhere along the coastline and worry less about where the data is collected?

@Sea Of Atlas @Captain Ahab @CWitek @Lou T all got it right. I feel very strongly about having time invested in one location, not saying that is the only place you should fish, but in my experience, it pays to have a good idea where a beach can hold fish under all conditions, tides, etc. I grew up next to a few beaches in my area, and have been fishing one in particular since I was 10, so roughly 26 years now. If I'm going fishing, even if my pals are planning to drive to the canal or the somewhere in another state, there's a good chance I will go there. I know where the fluke sit in August on a dead low tide, and I know where bluefish cruise when headed from one end of LIS to the other. Where the boulders are at high tide, where the submerged structure is, where the holes and weed patches are, which direction the tide will move after a big storm swell and how long the water takes to clear up after the river up the coast dumps all the runoff.

 

Even after all that time I can still get skunked on what should be a good evening, but at least I won't spend too much wasted time trying. I have been careful about who I fish with there, since it's my happy place and I earned the knowledge that I need to catch there, and won't easily give it away to a stranger just to get mugged for a spot down the road. When you say "location location location" you are dead right, especially for stripers. Finding the fish is the hard part, getting them to bite is simple (not necessarily easy). If you fish for other species, you will learn more and more about the waters as you explore them. Having a general idea where fish are over a 4 mile stretch is not as productive as having an intimate knowledge of two separate sections of coast that span 1/8 mile. Just don't pick the spots because they are easy to get to, or easy to traverse, pick the spots that are the "fishiest" and least pressured and start combing through. If you don't have success over time, pivot to another spot until you start to piece together the puzzle. Pick one rocky stretch, and pick one isolated beach. Try to find two places that are complete opposites, by which I mean if the fish aren't in one, they will probably be in the other. Even having a low tide/outgoing spot and a high tide/incoming spot makes planning a trip more convenient for you, but you won't know exactly what to expect until the experience is gained.

 

If you can, try and get on a boat and see the water from the other side as well, there's plenty to learn that way too. I have a boat I fish from, with a navigation screen but not a single piece of electronic "fishing help" on it so I'm sure you could use that kind of stuff to your advantage too. I was fishing one of my spots on a calm day around dusk and there were two guys in nice fishing kayaks that came by within casting range, so I waited for them to pass so I could keep fishing. One guy stopped dead right in front of me, and just as I was going to splash a warning cast right next to his stern he suddenly started going in tight little circles while staring at his sidescan, then called out his buddy "There's a GIANT log down there, must have been a HUGE tree" and then continued on his way. What do you know I never made many casts directly at that spot, as it was the least appealing spot from what I could see around, and since then I have caught a handful of 40"+ striper casting at that log. 

 

I recently moved further away from my favorite fishing grounds, which made me start exploring some new ones. I'll do some recon in the evening, no rod, no reel, no headlamp, just to observe. It's hard to notice everything if you are focused on working a plug or making cast after cast, and very hard to resist the temptation to fish if I carry my gear with me. I still have it in the car in case the place blows wide open with a frenzy of fish, but otherwise I am just trying to get a feel for it instead of just getting lucky and showing up at the right time. The process sucks and I hate it, if I'm going to be honest. Not knowing where the fish are in a stretch of water makes me uneasy and frustrated, and every part of me wants to just make the trip to the spots I know- but I can split my time doing both since I will benefit in the end.

 

I could keep going on and on about this- like I said I have a very strong opinion about this. Good luck in your exploration.

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On 9/21/2020 at 2:26 PM, worldsworstangler said:

Thanks all for the responses, I guess what I’m getting at is this: 

 

There is one beach where I have caught fish at different times throughout the year. In my mind, if I were making a fishing log (tide, wind, sweep, sun, moon phase etc), fishing this one beach only, could provide a great log (for that one beach). Fishing the estuary 3 miles northeast may provide some information for a certain day/time/tide etc, but it’s a bit difficult to be fishing two places at once in order to collect multiple data sets. 
 

 

So I guess what I’m asking is, does it make more sense to fish one beach only, or fish anywhere along the coastline and worry less about where the data is collected?

Dude what? I think you’re placing too much emphasis on just having a log. Go fish. 
 

 

Edit:

You should log your fisbing trips according to where you go. Not just for “data”. The point of fishing is to catch fish right? So if you have the worst conditions imaginable at spot A, but spot B is 3 miles away and would fish better in those conditions, would you fish spot B to catch fish or fish spot A to get “data” for your log? 
 

I don’t have a log. It’s too much work for me. I like to go Out and fish and think about what happened several times over cause each trip burns a memory in my mind. Having said that, fish the spots that you have a gut feeling about in order to catch fish, and enter your results into the log That way. 

Edited by linesiderdemdnj

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On 9/21/2020 at 2:26 PM, worldsworstangler said:

Thanks all for the responses, I guess what I’m getting at is this: 

 

There is one beach where I have caught fish at different times throughout the year. In my mind, if I were making a fishing log (tide, wind, sweep, sun, moon phase etc), fishing this one beach only, could provide a great log (for that one beach). Fishing the estuary 3 miles northeast may provide some information for a certain day/time/tide etc, but it’s a bit difficult to be fishing two places at once in order to collect multiple data sets. 
 

 

So I guess what I’m asking is, does it make more sense to fish one beach only, or fish anywhere along the coastline and worry less about where the data is collected?

learning a few spots well, will serve you better than trying to fish the entire east cost

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This rule dose not apply to the NJ, June east coast blitz of the past ... :eek:

 

Even then you would of benefited by sitting on the bait in your favorite spot till the games begun.

 

Can't catch anything driving aimlessly up and down the coast

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