makelearns6

Freshwater Fishing - Beginner - Help Needed (socal)

8 posts in this topic

Me and a few friends have recently taken up fishing. We went to lake Castiac today in southern california and had zero sucess. We tried the "carolina Rig" as well as utilized some lures and caught nothing.

Our hooks repeatedly were getting caught on rocks causing use to lose lures / bait.

Is there any recommended fishing spots in so cal? Any recommendations for beginners to fresh water fishing. We experimented with powerbait / mouse tail / blood worm / cast master / robo worm and nothing was hitting.

Any tips to get some fishing noobs going would be greatly apprecaited

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3 hours ago, makelearns6 said:

Me and a few friends have recently taken up fishing. We went to lake Castiac today in southern california and had zero sucess. We tried the "carolina Rig" as well as utilized some lures and caught nothing.

Our hooks repeatedly were getting caught on rocks causing use to lose lures / bait.

Is there any recommended fishing spots in so cal? Any recommendations for beginners to fresh water fishing. We experimented with powerbait / mouse tail / blood worm / cast master / robo worm and nothing was hitting.

Any tips to get some fishing noobs going would be greatly apprecaited

 

 

This site is great, but there are relatively few Southern California-based members.

 

 

Edited by Tunanorth

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22 hours ago, makelearns6 said:

Me and a few friends have recently taken up fishing. We went to lake Castiac today in southern california and had zero sucess. We tried the "carolina Rig" as well as utilized some lures and caught nothing.

Our hooks repeatedly were getting caught on rocks causing use to lose lures / bait.

Is there any recommended fishing spots in so cal? Any recommendations for beginners to fresh water fishing. We experimented with powerbait / mouse tail / blood worm / cast master / robo worm and nothing was hitting.

Any tips to get some fishing noobs going would be greatly apprecaited

 

I live in NY, but fished LMB in SoCal for a while.

 

A lot of those lakes (Casitas, Castiac, etc.) fish similar.  The dynamic is super-sized bass feeding on crawfish, other baitfish, and gorging themselves on stocker trout as soon as the truck backs up dumping them in.  A lot of guys target them with heavy equipment and realistic swimbaits, some of which are custom and get expensive.  Get a copy of "Sowbelly" by Monte Burke to read all about it, and the pursuit of the world record LMB there.

 

If you can swing it, hire a guide for a day.  Nothing will warp speed you across the learning curve faster than spending time with a guy who knows the water and successful tactics like the back of his hand.  The conversations, and questions you ask, will replace years of expensive, frustrating, and time-consuming trial and error.  I've done it a number of times when trying to learn a new fishery fast.

 

I was focused on Diamond Valley lake out there, primarily because my sister was an engineer who helped build it.  I was frustrated trying to solve it until I hired a guide.  

 

The dynamic was as I mentioned, crayfish and stocker trout.  We started out skittering crankbaits along the bottom, trying to make gentle contact with stumps and rocks like crayfish retreating backwards along the bottom.  

 

The real success, however, was something I wouldn't have hit upon in a million years in a lake of bass feeding on trout.  We drop shotted, something I knew of, but never tried.  Gear was surprisingly light, and we used thin little purple robo worms.  Got them all down near the bottom in that hot California sun.

 

Last, visit the nearest local tackle shops and see what they're stocking.  That will tell you what guys are throwing.  Then ask the guy behind the counter how people are taking fish.  Most often they know how it's being done.

 

 

 

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Also consider that if you are fishing a rocky bottom, you may want to use simple lures rigged "weedless" which also helps when hitting a rocky bottom. Here in the northeast most of our waters are either muddy or sand/gravel bottom rivers, weed filled ponds or deep kettle ponds/lakes. Each presents its own challenge to fishing.

That's why it helps to have a variety of tackle to choose from when you hit the water.

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If those lakes are rocky bottom and have crayfish you are set!

 

I would use creature baits on jigs or t rigged with a bullet weight.  I like to use just enough weight to get contact with the bottom but not snag too much.  

 

For rocky lakes here i like the zoom brush hog, yamamoto fat ika and similiar style soft plastics.  A big tube on a tube jig can be really productive.

 

Again never fished your area but i know here in the  north eastern USA if i am fishing a rocky lake i look for wood submerged like a tree or log.  Those bass like to sit on any wood so learn how to find it with your sonar and you will catch.

 

Also transition areas where it goes from rock to sand, mud or gravel can be great.

 

Let us know how you do

Edited by Captain Ahab

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10 hours ago, Captain Ahab said:

If those lakes are rocky bottom and have crayfish you are set!

 

I would use creature baits on jigs or t rigged with a bullet weight.  I like to use just enough weight to get contact with the bottom but not snag too much.  

 

For rocky lakes here i like the zoom brush hog, yamamoto fat ika and similiar style soft plastics.  A big tube on a tube jig can be really productive.

 

Again never fished your area but i know here in the  north eastern USA if i am fishing a rocky lake i look for wood submerged like a tree or log.  Those bass like to sit on any wood so learn how to find it with your sonar and you will catch.

 

Also transition areas where it goes from rock to sand, mud or gravel can be great.

 

Let us know how you do

Don't forget features you can read from shore.

Where the shore juts out into the water will usually have a similar underwater appearance.

ANYPLACE where a creek, stream or river enters a larger body of water, either out in front (slower waters) or edges (faster waters).

Overhangs, either trees on shore or an undercut riverbank.

 

Man, the list would go on for some time. I believe all anglers can hit their favorite piece of water, one that they've fished for ages, and still learn something new about it. That's the attractive appeal of fishing...it's always changing from day to day, season to season. Hence the saying "A bad day fishing is better than a good day at work"

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I have never fished out there but from reading articles over the years I think the lakes your referring to are large and deep  lakes. I would suggest for a beginner that u should try to find smaller and shallower lakes to hone your skills on how to target bass. I'm assuming they r available within reasonable driving distance. Large lakes can be intimidating to even more experienced  bass fisherman. Good luck and don't get discouraged, it is a lot a fun to target bass

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For big lakes break it down.  Learn one area at a time.  I might fish the same quarter mile over and over learning the nooks and crannies.

 

Figure out what areas have what you are looking for and pound them with different techniques and baits.  

 

If you find something good look for other areas that are similar 

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