drp1223

Best beginner reel

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What would you guys consider the best real to "learn on"? Don't mind the price but want an easily usable, non complicated reel to help me build my technique. 

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Almost all fly reels are very very simple.  Compared to any other reel type anyway.  What species and size of fish?  Boat or shore or both.  The main fly reel types that you would want to consider for ease of use and low or no maintenance will have a sealed drag, or else unsealed but with the fewest possible number of parts in their part diagrams.

 

For a low cost surf capable reel that is user maintainable without tools, look at the Echo Bravo series. If the species you are targeting with fly are like the ones in your avatar then that reel might be slightly undergunned.  Look instead at the Redington Behemoth series of reels for lower cost boat reel.  However, it is not as easy to maintain and should not be dunked.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

My favorite are the Nautilus reels.

But you're way off base if you think it will have any effect on your "style".

The reel is a weight at the end of your fly rod that holds your line.

Period.

A smooth working reel is very nice - but it not going to have an effect on your casting - if that's what you mean by style.

Herb

Edited by HL

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Both of the reels Herb mentioned would be good choices.  If you want to step up from the Remington in price and build quality and have a good drag system then you might also want to check out the Orvis Hydros reels in a 9/10.  Once you get above $300 you have a lot of different choices but as Herb already mentioned no reel is going to help with your casting....

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I typically skip over replying to topics like this as they tend to turn into a pissing match of opinions. But I’ll play along. 
I am a Machinist with 25 years under my belt. I also have 40+ years fly fishing experience. I have a really good handle of how fly reels are produced and know the reasons why they’re so expensive. 
I also have been buying, selling, trading high end gear for about 15 years. There’s a pretty good chance I’ve laid my hands upon reels of all sorts. 
Prior to purchasing out retirement home here in North Carolina. Read Trout land now. I was in Southern Maine. Read Striped Bass, and Trout. 
With all that garbage out of the way. These statements hold true. 
1.) The fish could care less what reel you purchase. 
2.) Purchase what your wallet can stomach the best. 
3.) Salt Water and Sand are the mortal enemies of reels. Even the expensive ones. 
4.) A drag system with low start up inertia is your friend. 
 

When I chased Stripers I used Scientific Anglers System 2 reels. They are tried and true. Possess a bulletproof disc drag with low start up inertia. Can be had for short money on EBay. When the salt water killed em I’d just buy another. 
 

I have owned more high end sealed drag fly reels then I care to admit. They’re all great to a point. And when yours get jammed up with sand you’ll realize why I no longer would use them. 
 

So what’s in my quiver now? I use JRyall reels almost exclusively save for a couple Hardy reels. The Ryall which is the same as it’s less expensive cousin Tioga have a Type 3 hard anodizing that’s nearly as good as it gets. The reel is very simple with few moving parts. Therefore they’re very easy to clean and maintain. And the low start up inertia is excellent. 
 

For high end stuff I’d say Seigler Reels is the gold crown these days. 

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Gotta add that my advice was based on low priced beginner reels that can be purchased new for around $100.  If you are someone that isn't sure whether you will become more serious then either of these would probably do you for multiple seasons of use with a little care.  All the other recommendations here are reels that are more expensive, with the exception of the Old Scientific Anglers System 2s.  Ryall reels are a bit more and Teton reels are a bit more still, especially if they are the large arbor versions in salt sizes (7-12wt).  All the reels suggested here are good reels, especially Nautilus and the even higher end reels like Seigler, Mako etc will cost you big time. :hooked:

 

It does make a difference if you will be using the reel from shore or boat.  If there is the possibility that you will be fishing the surf or from shore then I'd follow Lineside's excellent advice above.  Tetons, Ryalls, older System 2s are all very easy to service because they use so few parts and any fiddly internals are accessible.  Can learn to field repair them and get any sand or corrosion issues dealt with fairly easily.  The Echo Bravo is a new design that can be serviced in the field with no tools or only a coin.  But the others that Lineside mentioned are tried and true reels albeit must be found used (so condition and prior owners care could be an issue).

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17 hours ago, drp1223 said:

What would you guys consider the best real to "learn on"? Don't mind the price but want an easily usable, non complicated reel to help me build my technique. 

sealed Piscifan 9/10 ,$150 on web $20 cupon,price is right coming from NJ warehouse,few days,work good.same quality you have to pay $400.

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Your gonna get some great advice here. Pleased to see some highly respected members weighing in. 
I must add that the purchase of a spare spool to go with whatever reel you choose is a smart move in my opinion. 

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On 9/12/2020 at 7:01 PM, drp1223 said:

What would you guys consider the best real to "learn on"? Don't mind the price but want an easily usable, non complicated reel to help me build my technique. 

The reel has absolutely nothing to do with your technique and won't help you build it one bit.  you could granny knot the fly line to some backing, thread it through a rod and let it lay on the ground, won't affect your "technique" one bit.  A rod matched with a proper line will merely level the playing field, if you want to build your technique then you need to find a casting instructor you work well with, find a rod that fits your casting style, and a line to match it.  Reel has squat to do with it.  Did I mention that?

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8 hours ago, snag777 said:

sealed Piscifan 9/10 ,$150 on web $20 cupon,price is right coming from NJ warehouse,few days,work good.same quality you have to pay $400.

Bulls#*t. . .

 

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When I started fly fishing in the late 1970's,  I acquired a couple of Ambassadeur 178 fly reels. List price was $25.00. Light weight and utmost simplicity and I still use them today. Capacity is 150 yards of 20# Micron plus a WF8 or 9F. Back in the day I used them to catch 4 IGFA tippet records including a 40+ lb. striper and 3 Atlantic bonito. Point is that you don't don't need an expensive fly reel for the vast majority of inshore fishing that we do. Go light and simple. If you're targeting heavier quarry like tuna or tarpon that's a different story.

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