luckyOC

Delmarva Fishin' Reports - September 2020

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As always, this is the place for your reports... as little or as much detail as you care to share, with hopefully a good bit less focus posted on exact spots, times, and locations. Any and all word from the local waters welcome here, and "no fish" reports are welcome as well; always good to have gotten out there at least, wasn't it? 

;)

 


Another September has arrived!

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Well I'm supposed to be in canada right now fishing for muskie. Since they won't let me in I will be making lots of beach trips this fall! Hope everyone has a great fall season!

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I am very excited about this fall.  Been out every other Saturday (and it's a long drive for me) to get my casting and gear dialed in.  Heading out 9/14-15. Can't wait

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I am still waiting for the OSV to open to the state line before I bother going back down, to much of a circus at the moment.  I can't imagine the pressure the rangers will have to open it up for this weekend, curious to see how they handle it if the turtles haven't hatched yet.

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I think 2020 has been a pretty messed up year for everyone. I sure hope September will put some smiles on the faces of those fortunate enough to be on AI Surf Fishing for those Magnificent Reds . 

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"Temp" closure going on 3 weeks tomorrow.  Boy those nudist camps down at the state line must be having a really good time.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

no end date for the turtles hatching, we are past day 60, which is the normal incubation it appears.  NPS on social media.

·

Assateague Island National Seashore
On August 19, a partial OSV public use closure was installed at Km 20.5 to protect a loggerhead sea turtle nest that was nearing 60 days incubation, which was its most-likely hatch time. Two weeks have passed and there is still no hatch, so what’s going on?
Sea turtles dig a nest chamber, lay their eggs, cover them, and then leave them untended to be incubated under natural conditions. That’s why it’s impossible to predict the exact hatch date for sea turtle eggs. Hatch time depends on a series of highly variable external factors which influence the nest chamber temperature during incubation. These factors include air temperature (both the average over time and fluctuations), moisture levels from rainfall and overwash (ranging from slight dampness to full inundation), depth of the nest chamber which varies as sand either accumulates or is blown away, and sand grain size and texture.
Because temperature plays such a large role in incubation time, it’s logical that the farther north a nest is laid, the longer the incubation time becomes. In Florida, sea turtle nests typically incubate for 45 to 55 days, while sea turtle nests in Virginia have incubated for no less than 60 days. Last summer was one of the hottest on record for our area, and our first sea turtle nest hatched around day 60. This summer has been nearly as hot on average as last summer, and so following consultation with experts, we expected our first nest to hatch somewhere around day 60.
Resource management staff are documenting the specifics that affect incubation time and will use that data to better inform management of sea turtle nests in the future. To begin seeing correlations between hatch time, temperature variations, and water levels for sea turtle nests in Maryland, we installed data loggers near each nest. These data loggers record sand temperature at nest chamber level, and water levels to document severity and duration of inundation events. The chart illustrates the temperature data up through day 60 from the first sea turtle nest in 2020, and the nest that hatched successfully at about 60 days in 2019. For the 2020 nest, what stands out is a spike in temperature at about day 20, and then approaching day 50, a drop in temperature. These data points correspond to increasing air temperatures in early July, and an overwash event in early August, which are the types of events that can influence incubation time. (Text and graph: Allison Turner and Tami Pearl)
 
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Edited by luckyOC

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