Kones1

Defund the NPS

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Fire them all. What good do they do ? Pick up trash ? No. Keep taxpayers from using property tax dollars pay for? Yes. In the name of a special interest group with a small number of people. What kind of BS is this ? Fire them all. Start over. Save millions of dollars 

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1 hour ago, Kones1 said:

Fire them all. What good do they do ? Pick up trash ? No. Keep taxpayers from using property tax dollars pay for? Yes. In the name of a special interest group with a small number of people. What kind of BS is this ? Fire them all. Start over. Save millions of dollars 

4 million tax payers used the property in 2018 allegedly bringing $450 million to the local economy. 

Is the "special interest group with a small number of people" you're referring to the ORV community?

What is it exactly that you are suggesting these NPS people do wrong?

NPS didn't write the Endangered Species Act but as federal employees they're obligated to follow it.

Are you saying it's their fault the beach is too washed out for ORV travel?

Or is it that picking up trash thing?

 

 

 

News Release Date: May 28, 2019

Contact: Brian Carlstrom, Superintendent, 508-957-0701

 

WELLFLEET, Mass– A new National Park Service (NPS) report shows that 3,926,462 visitors to Cape Cod National Seashore in 2018 spent $495 million dollars in communities near the park. That spending supported 6,098 jobs in the local area and had a cumulative benefit to the local economy of over $638 million dollars.

“Cape Cod National Seashore welcomes visitors from across New England, the country, and around the world,” said Superintendent Brian Carlstrom. “We are delighted to share the story of this place and the experiences it provides. We also feature the seashore as a way to introduce our visitors to Cape Cod and all that it offers. National park tourism is a significant driver in the national economy, returning $10 for every $1 invested in the National Park Service, and it’s a big factor in the Cape economy as well. We appreciate the partnership and support of our towns and are glad to be able to give back by helping to sustain local communities.” 

The 2018 Visitor Spending Effects analysis incorporates newly available survey data for Cape Cod National Seashore and 18 additional parks in the National Park System. The survey was part of a pilot project to develop long-term, scientific monitoring and collection of visitor data during a park’s peak season. Previous spending estimates for Cape Cod were calculated by using generalized visitor spending data from other parks in the National Park System. The new survey data shows that people spent more time in the park, stayed longer in gateway communities and spent more money during their visit. The updated data, change in visitation, and inflation contributed to an overall 180% increase in estimated visitor spending Cape Cod this year. The new data showed an upward effect on visitor spending estimates for the state of Massachusetts and for the Northeast region. This chart shows the comparison of Cape Cod National Seashore spending from the pilot project with previous general profiles.   
 

  2017 Visitor Spending
Effects
2018 Visitor Spending Effects Change % Change
Visits 4,125,419 3,926,462 198,957 -4.8%
Visitor Spending
($Million)
$176.5 $495.0 $318.5 180.4%
Output ($Million) $221.5 $638.6 $417.1 188.3%
Jobs 2,103 6,098 3,995 190%


The peer-reviewed visitor spending analysis was conducted by economists Catherine Cullinane Thomas and Egan Cornachione of the U.S. Geological Survey and Lynne Koontz of the National Park Service. The report shows $20.2 billion of direct spending by more than 318 million park visitors in communities within 60 miles of a national park. This spending supported 329,000 jobs nationally; 268,000 of those jobs are found in these gateway communities. The cumulative benefit to the U.S. economy was $40.1 billion. Lodging expenses account for the largest share of visitor spending, about $6.8 billion in 2018. Food expenses are the second largest spending area and visitors spent $4 billion in restaurants and bars and another $1.4 billion at grocery and convenience stores.

Visitor spending on lodging supported more than 58,000 jobs and more than 61,000 jobs in restaurants. Visitor spending in the recreation industries supported more than 28,000 jobs and spending in retail supported more than 20,000 jobs.

Report authors also produce an interactive tool that enables users to explore visitor spending, jobs, labor income, value added, and output effects by sector for national, state, and local economies. Users can also view year-by-year trend data. The interactive tool and report are available at the NPS Social Science Program webpage.

To learn more about national parks in Massachusetts and how the National Park Service works with Massachusetts communities to help preserve local history, conserve the environment, and provide outdoor recreation, go to the Massachusetts page of the National Park Service website.

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Thanks for sharing all that. Accessibility is being denied in the name of a bird. Management of this land does seem simple when you deny access. Sharing is management properly done. Most managed lands were once a lot more accessible but our government got involved and lost sight of what they were hired for. The motto was to be shared and enjoyed by all. 

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Minor point. the National seashore is not all NPS. There are large swaths of privately owned land included in the national sea shore and only a small portion of the sea shore is managed/run by the NPS. It might keep your rants more rationale if you differentiate between the two.

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3 hours ago, Saltyp said:

Can you still walk on these closed ORV beaches?

Shhhhhh…………...That was a secret.But there is an issue that actually does restrict walking too in many places.The whining always happens when "someone" can't do something.Getting involved with the parties all the time creates 1st hand knowledge about the issue no matter what it is.The saying "keep your friends close and your enemies closer" holds true.Over the last couple of decades a lot of promises were made to the ORV users[I am less of one now] about access and the "working together to find a common goal".The newer buzz-word came "evolved".That meant what we told you and what you spent so so many hours helping transport fencing[installing],beach grass[planting],rope,food,water,hauling[removing] massive old pier pilings,phone poles,trees,flot sum& jet sum,etc. on and off these beaches got it stuck right up the ya-zoo.The environmental groups are very well funded,patient, and look way into the future for getting their way with lawyers and making laws to their advantage.The real "hammer" went down right around 1985.

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2 hours ago, theshadow said:

The environmental groups are very well funded,patient, and look way into the future for getting their way with lawyers and making laws to their advantage.The real "hammer" went down right around 1985.

Many don't understand this point, they think it's a fair fight with a chance things will get better......they won't.

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Corpslave said:

There's not enough sand left to drive on. Erosion will eventually shut it all down. 

In the last 50+ years I've seen it change and change and change.People have to be on that beach and keep an eye on those changes.The sand "givith and taketh away".Walking out from Snail rd. and monitoring what's going on there in the Peaked Bar area to High Head.Lots of sand out there now with those beach cuts in the way.Years ago we ran those cuts timing waves and "holding on for life and vehicle" as we slipped ,slid,& sank.Now like I commented prior most don't have vehicles with good clearance for that situation.So, disaster is looming.The seashore doesn't want to deal with it so close it problem solved.We stayed in the dune shacks out at Peaked hill for many years off and on.Years the waves were kissing the dune edge one year the next 200' of sand is there a year or 2 later.While staying in a shack a couple of years back[no vehicle] in October we heard engine noises.Looked out to the left and a truck was stuck up to the frame and they had run through the barrier at exit 8.They were at the bar and bend with incoming tide 200yds from the shack.Thank fully my cellphone worked and got a call to the visitors center to get a ranger out hopefully to them prior to the tide.2 came out and it took both to winch and strap them out as the tide was half up the tires.One of the rangers drove down to us and thanked us for calling.He said that it was going to cost him "quite a bit" and ban for sometime.Also,I've good and bad experiences with different rangers over the years which I won't go into.Bottom line,if you're going to bitch about it fine.Have documentation and facts at the ready to prove your point.Not just whine!!!!! Then be prepared for "we'll take that under consideration".We al now what that means...……...Sorry to rant.

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52 mins ago, z-man said:

Not in the areas roped off for bird nesting. 

guess i was asking because you can still go to the beach and fish, you just can't drive there.  not sure why nps needs to be defunded just because some dude is too lazy to walk the beach.

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3 mins ago, Saltyp said:

guess i was asking because you can still go to the beach and fish, you just can't drive there.  not sure why nps needs to be defunded just because some dude is too lazy to walk the beach.

Too lazy? Some of these spots we’re talking about are miles away from any parking area and it’s deep sugar sand.  Not many if any people are walking out there. 

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2 mins ago, z-man said:

Too lazy? Some of these spots we’re talking about are miles away from any parking area and it’s deep sugar sand.  Not many if any people are walking out there. 

people hike to fish all the time, not seeing the issue other than having paid for an orv permit that you can't use

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54 mins ago, Saltyp said:

people hike to fish all the time, not seeing the issue other than having paid for an orv permit that you can't use

Have you actually been to these beaches? Virtually no one is out there if the ORV is closed. Not just fishermen either, all users. 

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2 mins ago, z-man said:

Have you actually been to these beaches? Virtually no one is out there if the ORV is closed. Not just fishermen either, all users. 

did the nps tell people they couldn't go out there?

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