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Custom Fly Lines

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You can always contact Steve Godshall in the pacific northwest.   He builds custom lines to your specifications.  Just Google his name to get you started.

 

HT

Quote

 

 

These are lines designed by Steve Godshall, and why we call them the Steve Godshall Specials …. the SGS lines. They include ….

  • SGS Scandi Shooting Heads.
  • SGS Floating Skagit Shooting Heads.
  • SGS Slow Sink Skagit Shooting Heads (Available Soon).
  • SGS Classic Speys (Available Soon).
  • SGS IT Scandi Systems.
  • SGS IT Floating Skagit Systems.
  • SGS Level Running Lines (Available in three diameters).
  • SGS Mend Master Tapered Running Lines (Available in two weights).
  • SGS Zink Tips ~ Zink impregnated polymer tip material (available in bulk or tip kit

 

 

 

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Braided Mono can be used to join two pieces of fly line - simply cut each at a 45 and finger torture them down a length of the braid to secure

 

I’ve made heads this way the results were rarely worth the effort but fun to try

FE54A496-E156-4BA8-B7EA-3EB10B88A69B.jpeg

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32 mins ago, Beomurf said:

Braided Mono can be used to join two pieces of fly line - simply cut each at a 45 and finger torture them down a length of the braid to secure

 

I’ve made heads this way the results were rarely worth the effort but fun to try

FE54A496-E156-4BA8-B7EA-3EB10B88A69B.jpeg


How was the connection?  Would any adhesive improve the situation?

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Merging two fly lines

 

 

Splicing lines together using thread and glue can be replaced by another method if you are using coated lines. See how easy it is to weld lines togeteher using shrink tubes and a heater.

Hint

Practice on an old fly line or a cheap line. The first few times you might fail, but when you get the hang of it, its quit easy.

This is only a start-guide. There are many variants of making loops with shrink tubes. Make your own experiments.

Merging Two Lines

Below is a step-by-step guides showing how to make merge two lines. The method is universal for all coated fly lines and makes it possible to make you own WF-lines, smooth connections and more.

Step 1

- Insert your fly line into a piece of shrink tube af approx. 6-8 cm (2-3 inches).

Step 1 - Insert one of the fly lines into a piece of shrink tube of approx. 6-8 cm (3 inches) -
Michael Sorensen
 

Step 2

- Heat the tips of the fly lines.

Step 2 - Heat the tips of the fly lines.  -
Michael Sorensen
 

Step 3

Remove the coating.

Step 3 - Remove the coating.  -
Michael Sorensen
 

Step 4

- Now the fly lines are ready to be merged.

Step 4 - Now the fly lines are ready to be merged. -
Michael Sorensen
 

Step 5

- Sew the core from each fly line into the center of the coating of the other fly line..

Step 5 - Sew the core from each fly line into the center of the coating of the other fly line. -
Michael Sorensen
 

Step 6

- (optional) Before pulling the lines tight together, apply a bit of glue.

Step 6 - (optional) Before pulling the lines tight together, apply a bit of glue. -
Michael Sorensen
 

Step 7

- Pull the fly lines tight together (before the glue dries out).

Step 7 - Pull the fly lines tight together (before the glue dries out). -
Michael Sorensen
 

Step 8

- Cut of the tag ends of the cores.

Step 8 - Cut of the additional cores. -
Michael Sorensen
 

Step 9

- Place the shrink tube over the merged position.

Step 9 - Place the shrink tube over the merged position. -
Michael Sorensen
 

Step 10

- Apply heat to merge. The coating should merge to the extra core inside.

Step 10 - Apply heat to merge. The coating should merge to the extra core inside. -
Michael Sorensen
 

Step 11

- Remove the used shrink tube.

Step 11 - Remove the used shrink tube. -
Michael Sorensen
 

Step 12

- You have now merged 2 fly lines.

Step 12 - You have now merged 2 fly lines.  -
Michael Sorensen
 

Tip 1:
This will not work on all fly lines!
It works better on floating lines than sinking and not on fly lines with a mono core.

Tip 2:
You can color code your lines by adding a small piece of coating in a different color under the shrink foil before welding. It requires some practice but the result is overwhelming.
Of course you can mark the line with markers before welding. However, this will fade over time.

This guide is made by Michael Sorensen from Innosoft.
Edited by HillTop

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For the mono braid method no glue is needed...

 

The only trick is you need to do something to keep the braid from unraveling at each end - this has no affect on the overall strength that's determined by the braid squeezing the two lines.

 

My preferred method is likely the easiest (I'm not ambitious) take a piece of 4# mono and tie a nail knot over the braid.  That's it - all this does is stop the unraveling.

 

Other methods are to whip the end with thread, various glues, or the shrink tubing that HT described. There will be two small bumps in the line after doing this, but if its in the head section it wont affect casting.

 

Like I said I've had success making heads but limited success making BETTER ones - you may do better.  The best one I ever made was a Float Tip - a length of T-14 married to a 5' section of floating line...figured it would drag along the sand but keep the fly a bit above the bottom - catches fish can't say for sure if its much better than just a sinking line but who really knows what's "best" anyhow...

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That's fantastic Hilltop! Thanks for sharing it.

 

If mono core lines must be used, I've had success by making a welded loop on one line, making another welded loop on the other that joins the two and then welding the whole lot together to remove the loopholes.

 

There are plenty of places online to show how to make the welded loops. Google is your friend on this aspect.

 

Cheers,

Graeme

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Posted (edited) · Report post

This came up again at a great time.  Found a shooting head I love and was debating how to remove the annoying loop to loop running line connection. 
 

Before I start experimenting, what are everyones expectations for the strength of a glued and/or welded splice? Also curious about the lifespan of the splice.  

 

Assuming there’s a lot of variation depending on splice length and quality of the bond.

 

I know hollow core braid splices are 100% connections but something about a knotless splice dependent on adhesive and welded pvc makes me skeptical of its strength.  

 

 

Edited by Bait Tailer

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