jeffreyrichard

New Peddle Kayaks

9 posts in this topic

I went to visit a local Hobie dealer to to have my Compass Loader fixed (free, warrantied by Hobie, thank you ... and BTW, if you have a Hobie Compass and cartop at all, this device is a game changer ...) saw a few new peddle yaks there ... Kayak Centre of RI in Wickford ... and they do have some Hobies, Old Towns and other yaks in stock ...

 

Saw a Perception Pescador Pilot 12 ... interesting. In the same class as a Hobie Compass. The drive was redesigned a bit due to initial problems. Much smaller than the Old Town drives ... did not looked sealed but that question could not be answered by the staff. Weight is 85 lb, stripped hull is 77. Not as cleanly designed as the Compass IMO, but  not bad. Worth taking a look at if you are on a budget.

 

Saw the Hobie Passport ... smaller than the compass. 2 piece hull (upper and lower) so don't know what that means as far as durability, but another potential failure point. The plastic is harder than the standard Hobies, and I was told it is much more difficult to cut and add modifications to. But it is cleanly designed and if you are a minimalist I'd check it out.

 

As an aside ... they had some basic OK Malibu's there ... what a clean looking simple platform ... makes me wonder why we add all the crap to our yaks. A rod holder, storage for some lures & pliers ... lets go fishiong. 

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Passport plastic is very tough and the seam is fully welded. Other than some short shots in the first few rudder blades that broke, I haven't heard of one failing.

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On 8/14/2020 at 9:38 AM, jeffreyrichard said:

Saw the Hobie Passport ... smaller than the compass. 2 piece hull (upper and lower) so don't know what that means as far as durability, but another potential failure point.

Pelican uses the same (or at least a very similar) manufacturing process and they always boast that the seam is the toughest part of the hull. 

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4 hours ago, drmevo said:

Pelican uses the same (or at least a very similar) manufacturing process and they always boast that the seam is the toughest part of the hull. 

I don’t know much about the manufacturing process of kayaks but they all appear to have a seam between the upper and lower sections of the hull. None of them look as though they are formed from one monolithic mold of plastic.

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On 8/18/2020 at 10:06 AM, Flip n Dip said:

I don’t know much about the manufacturing process of kayaks but they all appear to have a seam between the upper and lower sections of the hull. None of them look as though they are formed from one monolithic mold of plastic.

Looks can be deceiving. Most kayaks don't actually have a seam, and what you're seeing is just a line in the mold.

 

Most commercially produced kayaks are made by one of these three processes:

 

Blow-molded: Uses a one-piece mold where the plastic is sprayed (blown) into the mold. Usually produces inconsistent hull thicknesses. Most of the cheaper big box kayak brands are blow molded. There might be lines from the mold, but there are no seams.

 

Rotational-molded (aka rotomolded): Also uses a one piece mold, but the plastic is poured in and then the mold is rotated around to disperse the plastic, which leads to better consistency in hull thickness. This is the most common process used by the big name brands. Also has no seams.

 

Thermo-formed: The deck and hull are created with separate molds and then the pieces are sealed together, creating a seam. Usually considered not as good as rotomolded, but Eddyline uses this process and makes very good kayaks. The Hobie Passport is Hobie's first venture into thermo-formed kayaks. Having a different colored deck and hull is usually a dead giveaway that the kayak was thermo-formed.

 

The things I learn while obsessing about which kayak to buy....

Edited by Machine_Ruse

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9 hours ago, Machine_Ruse said:

Looks can be deceiving. Most kayaks don't actually have a seam, and what you're seeing is just a line in the mold.

 

Most commercially produced kayaks are made by one of these three processes:

 

Blow-molded: Uses a one-piece mold where the plastic is sprayed (blown) into the mold. Usually produces inconsistent hull thicknesses. Most of the cheaper big box kayak brands are blow molded. There might be lines from the mold, but there are no seams.

 

Rotational-molded (aka rotomolded): Also uses a one piece mold, but the plastic is poured in and then the mold is rotated around to disperse the plastic, which leads to better consistency in hull thickness. This is the most common process used by the big name brands. Also has no seams.

 

Thermo-formed: The deck and hull are created with separate molds and then the pieces are sealed together, creating a seam. Usually considered not as good as rotomolded, but Eddyline uses this process and makes very good kayaks. The Hobie Passport is Hobie's first venture into thermo-formed kayaks. Having a different colored deck and hull is usually a dead giveaway that the kayak was thermo-formed.

 

The things I learn while obsessing about which kayak to buy....

Thank you for explaining this. I guess the line in the mold had me fooled into thinking it was a seam. You obviously researched this very well...Do you have any thoughts on the Hobie Compass and Passport? Will the seam become a potential weak spot in your opinion? I’m not sure how much experience they have manufacturing that type of hull. They have been having enough problems lately with their rotomolded hulls cracking.

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4 hours ago, Flip n Dip said:

Thank you for explaining this. I guess the line in the mold had me fooled into thinking it was a seam. You obviously researched this very well...Do you have any thoughts on the Hobie Compass and Passport? Will the seam become a potential weak spot in your opinion? I’m not sure how much experience they have manufacturing that type of hull. They have been having enough problems lately with their rotomolded hulls cracking.

Unfortunately, all my knowledge about kayaks is academic at this point. I have no real world experience worth speaking of.

 

That said, I do know Eddyline's thermo-formed kayaks are held in pretty high regard for their light weight and durability. Their 12' Carribean is 45 pounds! It's a paddle only, but still, that's pretty damn light. The Hobie Passport 12 is 73 pounds without the Mirage drive installed.

 

I know that the plastics used in thermo-formed kayaks can be proprietary, and some are better than others. There definitely are cheap thermo-formed kayaks being made using cheaper plastics. Eddyline calls their plastic Carbonlite 2000, I don't know what Hobie uses or how it compares.

 

The Passport does not appear to provide any weight advantages. The Passport 12 and the Compass are nearly identically-sized boats, and the fitted hull weight of the Passport is actually five pounds heavier than that of the Compass. Since the Passport is so new, and comes with the older Mirage drive, I would probably pay $500 more and go for the Compass in that comparison.

 

I have not specifically looked for it, but I have not come across any reports of the seam splitting on any quality thermo-formed kayaks. For that matter, I don't recall ever reading any reports of it happening on cheap thermo-formed kayaks.

 

I also haven't seen any stories of hulls cracking on the Compass. But again, I haven't searched for that either. I didn't search for it on the Outback though, and I've sure come across enough stories about it to scare me away.

Edited by Machine_Ruse
Math...

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2 hours ago, Machine_Ruse said:

Unfortunately, all my knowledge about kayaks is academic at this point. I have no real world experience worth speaking of.

 

That said, I do know Eddyline's thermo-formed kayaks are held in pretty high regard for their light weight and durability. Their 12' Carribean is 45 pounds! It's a paddle only, but still, that's pretty damn light. The Hobie Passport 12 is 73 pounds without the Mirage drive installed.

 

I know that the plastics used in thermo-formed kayaks can be proprietary, and some are better than others. There definitely are cheap thermo-formed kayaks being made using cheaper plastics. Eddyline calls their plastic Carbonlite 2000, I don't know what Hobie uses or how it compares.

 

The Passport does not appear to provide any weight advantages. The Passport 12 and the Compass are nearly identically-sized boats, and the fitted hull weight of the Passport is actually five pounds heavier than that of the Compass. Since the Passport is so new, and comes with the older Mirage drive, I would probably pay $500 more and go for the Compass in that comparison.

 

I have not specifically looked for it, but I have not come across any reports of the seam splitting on any quality thermo-formed kayaks. For that matter, I don't recall ever reading any reports of it happening on cheap thermo-formed kayaks.

 

I also haven't seen any stories of hulls cracking on the Compass. But again, I haven't searched for that either. I didn't search for it on the Outback though, and I've sure come across enough stories about it to scare me away.

The weight of the Passport 12 is very disappointing. I was hoping it would be much lighter than 73 pounds. I see no reason to choose it over the Compass. Too bad Eddyline doesn't make a pedal kayak. A 12' kayak that weighs only 45 pounds is amazing! 

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